The War on Media

by Laura Haspeslagh

The media has always been under scrutiny. Many claim that George Orwell warned us of its dangers in his novel, “1984.” Though the book was written in 1949, many see similarities in his dystopia today.

Media has come up in politics more often with the topic of “fake news.” It feels as though we are surrounded by misinformation, making it difficult to find the truth. I think this confusing time stems from a fear that the media is in control of how we think. We’re worried about becoming the common analogy of conforming sheep and the government turning into the wolf in sheep’s clothing.

Mass communication studies show that the media isn’t telling us what to think, but instead what to think about. This still worries many, that the elite conglomerates of this county who own mainstream media companies are forcing their agenda upon us. So do we control the media or does the media control us?

Fearing the media would be a symptom of paranoia. To claim that the media has control over us would be to forfeit our abilities and accept that we are gullible. We have the sources needed to keep mainstream media accountable. Fact checking sites work avidly to confirm or deny information that sources put out. The market also works in a way that competitors keep each other in check in an effort to prove themselves to be the more reliable network.

Social media provides an outlet in which viewers can immediately respond in a positive or negative way that effects news reporting. It’s true that media is constantly in our faces within our society but we are the ones in control of the information we accept or reject. To say the media controls us would be undermining our own capabilities.

We know better than to simply accept whatever information is fed to us. Skepticism is important in verifying any information we receive. That’s why it is urged that we get our news from multiple sources. Any information from media should be taken with a grain of salt but that does not mean we must condemn it entirely. The media does have an agenda, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

There are so many topics that people value in hopes of making a difference, it would be impossible for anyone to give a fair amount of coverage to each issue. Media can provide the people with a unified topic to focus on that begins discussion and can lead to change. This isn’t to say that the topics that the media covers are more important than others or that the work that activists do is less important because it isn’t being covered by the media. However, the topics acknowledged in the news reach a mass audience that, in return, can illicit important discussions and change. Getting such a large audience to think and discuss similar issues is a feat in of itself.

Instead of fearing media, let’s embrace it wisely. Educate ourselves on issues brought up by the media and on the ones that aren’t. Listen to our peers and their own narratives on controversies. Have open-minded discussions. Become investigators ourselves. The media doesn’t have the power to control us unless we give it to them.

Investing in Knowledge

by Lorenzo Burgio

It is becoming increasingly difficult to convince upcoming generations that education is vital when poor graduates surround them.

Higher education is becoming more and more unappealing as the debt graduates face and the duration to pay them off increases. Being able to finish high school then immediately generate an income has become an increasingly appealing thought. There needs to be a sense of urgency to ensure higher education is obtainable and appealing for upcoming generations.

Benjamin Franklin was right when he said, “An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest,” but it appears to be developing into a bad investment, or at least one that doesn’t seem feasible for many.

Seven out of 10 students graduated from a four-year public or non-profit college with an average of $30,100 in student loans in 2015, which is a four percent increase from 2014 according to The Institute for College Access and Success (TICAS). In Connecticut, the average student debt for graduates of a four-year public or non-profit colleges is $34,773.

This is part of a gradual increase that has been seen for years. The average student loan upon graduation in 2012 was $29,400, “a 25 percent increase from $23,450 in 2008,” according to TICAS.

In addition to the amount of the loans increasing, so is the amount of students who are borrowing. In 2004, 62.4 percent of public university graduates had student loans — in 2012, that number rose to 71 percent, according to TICAS.

One Wisconsin institute performed a study in 2014 that concluded the average bachelors degree holder takes about 21 years to pay off their student loans in the United States. This is an extremely long time for upcoming generations to commit to.

If nothing is done to make higher education more affordable and accessible for upcoming generations, the size and amount of student loans are going to increase and the number of college graduates is going to decrease. The benefits of an educated population can only provide a helping hand to the economical and social aspects of our country.

“Research has supported this conventional wisdom, revealing that education not only enables individuals to perform better in the labor market, but also to improve their overall health, promote active citizenship and contain violence,” wrote the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development in a study about the social benefits of higher education.

It seems the words of John F. Kennedy have been forgotten and should be reiterated and taken into consideration to benefit upcoming generations.

“Student loans have been helpful to many. But they offer neither incentive nor assistance to those students who, by reason of family or other obligations, are unable or unwilling to go deeper into debt. It is, moreover, only prudent economic and social policy for the public to share part of the costs of the long period of higher education for those whose development is essential to our national economic and social well-being. All of us share in the benefits – all should share in the costs.”

Make Money Cleaning Out Your Closet

 

by Brennah Dallaire

Each year we ditch the old for the new, spending another fortune on the latest trends of the season. With these tips, you can put some money back in your pocket before you run out and buy those new sneakers.

 

Get Motivated

Grab a cup of coffee and turn the music on. The caffeine and good tunes will give you that extra motivation to purge all of the unworn clothing taking up space in your closet, and turn it into extra cash in your wallet. The best way to go about this process is to take an item out, then decide if it is a “keep” or “sell” item. Lay the “keep” items out on your bed and neatly fold the “sell” items, putting them in a garbage bag or reusable tote.

 

Ask Yourself The Important Questions

Deciding if an item is “keep” or “sell” is the hardest part. Here are a few tips to guide you to making a decision.

1. Is it a staple piece, meaning, is it timeless and can you pair it with many different outfits? If the answer is yes, throw it in the “keep” pile. If it is a trendy piece that your not sure is still in style, let it go, it’s a “sell”.

2. When was the last time you wore the item? If you have not worn the item in over a month, consider putting it in the “sell” pile. If it’s been three months or longer, it’s definitely a “sell” item.

3. Take a look at the pile of “sell” items. Make sure they are gently worn. They should have no holes, snags, or stains on them. They shouldn’t be older than a year a half.

 

Set Aside the High Ticket Items

Take a look at the pile of “sell” items one more time. Are there any designer or high end pieces? If so, set those pieces aside. If they are in excellent condition, you may want to put a little more effort in and sell them on a specialty site like Tradesy, Poshmark or Ebay. It is more work to set up an account, write a description and wait for a buyer. But if you get close to what you paid for the item originally, it will definitely be worth it.

 

Find Your Favorite Buy/Sell Service

Plato’s Closet is the easiest place to sell your gently used clothes. To sell, they require a valid photo ID. They take items that are up to 1.5 years old. The store will resell your items for 50-70% of what the item sold for at its original price, and you are given 30-40% of that, said Enfield Plato’s Closet Associate, Laura Kuphal. If the total of your sold items amounts to $40 or more, you will be paid by check. If the total is less than $40 you will be paid in cash, Kuphal said. Plato’s Closet does buy accessories including hats, headbands, belts, necklaces and jewelry (excluding body jewelry). Plato’s Closet excepts authentic designer brands including Coach, Michael Kors and Dooney and Bourke. Specially, trained employees verify that designer bags and accessories are authentic. Plato’s Closet offers a military discount, as well as a stamp card. Each stamp represents a $10 transaction, whether it be for buying or selling. Once you fill your stamp card, you can use the card as a 20% off coupon.

You will see the largest return on those high ticket items that were set aside in the purging process on a specialty site like Tradesy. Tradesy is an online marketplace to buy and sell gently used brand name clothing. The site boasts “Selling on Tradesy is Simple.” After creating an account, you can post the items you would like to sell. Tradesy will even enhance your photos to help them sell. Worried about the stress of shipping your items after they sell? Don’t be. According to tradesy.com, when you make a sale, Tradesy will send you a “pre-paid, pre-addressed shipping kit, complete with beautiful packaging.”  Tradesy will take a 14.9% commission. Access your earnings using PayPal, a debit card or an ACH transfer. Make sure your items are 100% authentic before listing them. If they are not, a buyer can flag the item. If a buyer returns an item they purchased from you, Tradesy will take care of the refund, unless it is because it was not as you described. If your item is not as you described or is not authentic, you as the seller will be charged back for the refund.

 

Cash It In 

Do you need some convincing to spend the time cleaning your closet out and selling your clothes? Shown here is a receipt from my personal transaction at Plato’s Closet. I brought in a small reusable tote full of my gently used clothes I haven’t worn in months. The proof is in the purchase. I purge my closet and sell at Plato’s Closet often, so this haul wasn’t as grand as some. See my receipt. Plato’s Closet offered me $21.90 for my clothes. There was a clearance sale happening in store, and I purchased two Old Navy shirts and an Old Navy skirt from there Summer 2016 inventory for $3.80. I left with $18.10.

 

Straight to Donation

The most important guideline to abide by is that anything you don’t sell at Plato’s Closet goes to donation. Plato’s Closet in South Windsor will take your unsold clothes and donate them for you. Call other locations to confirm they offer a similar service. Don’t put something you don’t wear back in your closet. The goal is minimalism, a decluttered closet and money is your pocket. If it has been over a month and you haven’t sold an item on one of the specialty sites mentioned, try selling the high ticket item at Plato’s Closet.

 

Enjoy Your Cash & Closet

You may have a favorite local thrift store in mind to sell to. That will work as well, but be aware of the commission they take.

Inside tip: Shop your items around. Inventory at used clothing stores are different, and will need different pieces or accessories. If some items don’t sell at one store, bring your haul to another before dropping it off at a donation drop box.

 

Repeat

Consumer Expenditure Surveys from 2013 show the average spending per year of people under 25-years-old is $1513.00 . For a college student, that is a decent chunk of change. The saying “it takes money to make money” is true when you can make money off the clothing you’ve already purchased. Purge items from your closet as soon as you feel it getting cluttered. Try it at the beginning or end of every season.

Fake News, Real Consequences

by Sarah Willson

Fake news can fill in the spaces of people’s knowledge with misleading information and is being spread through the modern-day media model of developing a target audience for advertisers to pay to reach, according to Craig Silverman the Media Editor at BuzzFeed.

Fallacies are increasingly being spread as individuals, particularly teenagers from Macedonia, use the modern-day media model for profit, explained Silverman.

They create a fake news site, write articles that satisfy the opinions of individuals, make multiple fake social media accounts and share the article to imitate traffic on the website. These “purely partisan and purely emotionally driven sites” are then able to make money from advertisers without them knowing it is a fake site.

“The headline [of news stories] often grabs people, but it’s often what is misleading people,” said Silverman. “Fake news sometimes fills in the gaps of people’s knowledge,” said the Toronto native to a crowd of about 110 people, Thursday night Feb. 16, at a presentation run by the Central Connecticut State University’s Department of Journalism about the current surge of fake news online.

Silverman explained how certain biased, untruthful and fake news sites are misinforming and confusing many Americans, and being spread through social media and fake news sites. Emotionally driven articles receive more of a reaction and in turn, more traffic, “because it makes an argument they want to push forward,” said Silverman.

The major factors that ultimately drive misinformation and misperceptions into the public eye. These include propaganda, hoaxes, un-credible news websites and fake news.

Fake news can come about within a society, emphasizing the fact that it often arises due to strong emotions and beliefs, according to Silverman, who is also the author of “Regret the Error,” where he reported on the issues and trends regarding the accuracy of the media.

“Rumors emerge in situations of uncertainty, fear or lack information,” said Silverman. “There’s never been a communication platform with that many people in history,” said Silverman, referring to social media, which he believes ultimately makes the public more susceptible to fake news.

Facebook, in particular, was notorious for spreading fake news during the 2016 election. The algorithmic filtering and lack of differentiating on social media account puts avid social media users in a “partisan echo-chamber,” said Silverman. This gives misleading and emotionally driven fake news sites an environment to thrive in.

According to a study done by Silverman, between February and Election Day, the total number of shares, reactions and comments for a piece of content on a Facebook source, soared from three million to 8.7 million.

Silverman believes this is due to a battle for attention; saying that it is fiercer than ever before, as social media has “achieved a scale unheard of in the history of human communication.”

One CCSU student had a lot to say about the epidemic of fake news like Silverman emphasizing how it’s taking a toll on the American people.

“If I want to stay informed about anything that is going on, I should probably come and see someone that’s speaking about it that has actual background in the media,” said freshman Amanda Rotch.

More than anything, Rotch was particularly concerned with President Donald Trump’s take on the media.

“I think it’s his way of dodging facts that he decides aren’t putting him in a good light,” said Rotch, referring to Trump’s comments about the media. “He’s finding a way to warp it so that the people who are reporting the facts about him are the ones that are at fault.”

“I think that he’s a businessman” said Rotch. “They’re very good at mincing their words.”

When asked about how to combat fake news, Rotch said she believed informing the public about it was the best way to stop it.

“Even stuff like having someone come here, who’s in the industry, and give a talk on fake news and his opinion and everything, I think is a way to help inform people and help them feel like they know what’s going on,” said Rotch.

Silverman also gave his opinion on the best way to not only stop fake news, but also how to regain the trust of journalists, who often bear the brunt of dealing with misinformation.

Silverman argued that ground rules need to be established when it comes to regaining the trust of journalists.

“The price for mistakes is greater,” said Silverman, believing that some journalists need to “slow down” in order to make sure they get the facts right before they are presented.

As for combating fake news, Silverman says the best way to do it is by informing others that what they are often seeing, reading and sharing is not always accurate.

“Don’t attack the person who shares the fake news, and don’t be confrontational,” said Silverman. “Listen to what they have to say, have a human conversation.”

Silverman also recommended showing the person trustworthy news sites.

For further information about fake news and how to combat it, Silverman recommended visiting thenewsliteracyproject.org, which informs and educates young people about journalistic integrity and the difference between facts and fiction.

More Than A Coach

 

Image result for ccsu donyell marshall

by Cyrus dos Santos

Central Connecticut State University men’s basketball coach Donyell Marshall, is a mentor to student athletes on and off the court. Marshall’s goal is to make the team feel like family, in addition to helping the Blue Devil’s improve their technique.

“Not only do I have to teach them the game of basketball, I have to teach them how to become men,” Marshall said.

“Not to say that their parents haven’t done that, but I think I’m an extension of that,” Marshall said.

Marshall, a 15 year National Basketball Association veteran, was drafted 4th overall out of UCONN by the Minnesota Timberwolves. During his time in the league, he played for 8 teams and finished with a .435 career field goal percentage. He ranks 302 for all-time points scored. Throughout his professional career, when it came to negative actions, Marshall stayed out of the public eye.

“I was never in the paper for nothing negative,” Marshall said.

“I think I’ve always been a good mentor to my own kids…I’m a role model, they’re all my kids, to me,” Marshall said.

“He takes us out to eat,” said Khalen Cumberlander, a senior on the team. “We went bowling last week,” he added, noting the many ways Marshall offers himself to his players. Cumberlander noted that he makes the men feel “that we’re family at the end of the day.”

“That’s the way we were at Connecticut,” Marshall said, referring to his time at UCONN under Coach Jim Calhoun. “We still see each other, we call each other,” he continued.

In the midst of a frustrating season, one of the team’s players suffered a loss in the family leading up to the Blue Devil’s game against Saint Francis University; Central’s first win in the Northeast Conference. Flowers were sent by the team to show their support.

“The first thing I said was, ‘This is our brother,’ ” Marshall said. “He’s going home to go through stuff, but you sent him on a high note,” Marshall continued.

“We preach the family atmosphere,” Marshall said, referring to recruiting players.

This was something he learned from his own experience in high school.

“I felt the sincerity in Coach Calhoun,” he remembered. “When he came to my house, he looked me in the eye the whole time.”

Marshall also noted that despite being a McDonald’s All-American player, Calhoun gave him no promise of a starting position; it was his genuineness that led Marshall to UCONN.

“When I recruit, that’s the way I try to recruit,” Marshall said.

Reflecting on the core of players he has now, Marshall’s commitment to the players extends beyond the twelve-man roster.

“We have the trust and belief of the parents,” he said.

“I guess it’s translated over,” Marshall added, “Because the crazy part is, after games when we lose, the first people who text me are the parents of the kids.”

Marshall recalled the comments he gets from parents including words of encouragement such as “Keep your head up coach” and “We still believe in you.”

“That always puts a smile back on your face. That you have the trust and belief of the parents,” Marshall said.

Marshall’s own sincerity is a by-product of the men he’s played for over the years. Though Calhoun’s style helps at the college level, there are others who’ve left their mark on Marshall.

“Jerry Sloan is probably my favorite NBA coach,” he noted.

The Blue Devil’s level of success this season is far from what fans may be looking for. But, Marshall is mindful, despite their 5-22 record, that there are signs of improvement.

“They were 351 last year,” Marshall said, concerning the team’s Ratings Percentage Index (RPI). CCSU is now 341, out of 351. “So, we jumped up ten spots,” Marshall said.

“You can look at the difference between this year and last year, the culture’s changing” said sophomore guard, Austin Nehls.

“If it was going to be easy, then everybody would be doing it,” said Marshall, referring to a motto they’ve adopted this season.

Last season, the Blue Devils finished with a 4-25 losing record.

“I’m a competitor,” said Marshall. “While I might have made a one game improvement, I’m not happy with myself,” Marshall continued.

“What did I do wrong in those games that we didn’t win,” he reflected.

As far as when fans can expect to see a significant change, Marshall stated that he didn’t want to put a time-table on it.

“Because for me, the competitiveness I have, next year I want to be better. Next year I want to get to the NCAA Tournament,” Marshall said.

“My time-table is always now,” said Marshall.

Blue Devils Outscored In The Paint

by Humera Gul

Central Connecticut State University’s Women’s Basketball fell to Robert Morris on Saturday in a devastating 62-39 loss. The Blue Devils struggled to find an identity and had a hard time making baskets.

CCSU had a very hard time shooting as they were only 12 of 54 from the field, 1 of 17 for three pointers and 14 of 24 from the foul line. The team passed the ball often. The loss wasn’t due to players hogging the ball or shooting preemptively. CCSU shot 1 for 17 three pointers, the lowest statistic of the category I have ever seen in a basketball game.

Robert Morris on the other hand had no problem shooting. They were 24 of 47 from the field, 5 of 12 for three pointers and 9 of 11 from the foul line. They had a total of 59 shots taken, where CCSU had 71 shots but CCSU was not able to capitalize on the extra possessions.

“Number one, they are a very good team, and this one I believe is their ninth straight win. There is a reason why they won as many games they won. They are number one in the conference and they are playing like that,” said Blue Devils Coach, Beryl Piper.

One Blue Devil that never gave up and continued to play was Aleah Epps. She was 3 out of 7 from the field and 2 out of 3 from the foul line. She played 32 of the 40 minutes in the game. She also had 4 rebounds, 1 assist and a steal. Giocelis Reynoso also stood out. Reynoso was only 2 of 7 from the field and 2 of 4 from the foul line. However, she did get eight rebounds and two steals.

“We just struggled offensively to find scores, we had some layups, we couldn’t make them. When you look at the shooting percentage, that’s the difference of the game. In the first period, they shot 62%, and in the second period 58%. We shot 20 and 8%. We couldn’t find a way to get a basket and they outscored us in the paint. They played tough and we really struggled against them, Coach Piper said.

The Blue Devils did struggle in the paint defensively, and was unable to do any damage in the paint.

Colonial Mikalah Mulrain shot 4 out of 5 from the field and 2 of 2 from the foul line. She also had an astounding nine rebounds, five were offensive rebounds, one assist and a block.

The Blue Devils record fell to 9-17 overall and 8-7 in the NEC play. Robert Morris is first in the division,17-9 overall and 12-3 in the NEC play.

CCSU will face off against Sant Francis Brooklyn at 1.p.m. this Saturday to close out their home games.

Linkin Park Returns with a New Single

Image result for linkin park heavy

by Matt Balogh

At the forefront of the nu metal scene in the early 2000s, Linkin Park has grown to find a fan base of millions. By combining a large sound of heavy metal influence and hip hop elements of rapping style vocals, and DJ-led turntable scratching. This created a distinct sound for them, allowing their debut album Hybrid Theory to sell over 30 million copies worldwide.

Being a favorite of nu metal and hip hop fans alike, Hybrid Theory became a base for many nu metal bands to follow. Their singles “In The End” and “One Step Closer” had seen large rotation on rock stations, and continue to be staples in their live performances to this day.

Over the years, the band has put out 6 albums more, each to a sloping response by their long time fans. Fans have criticized their change in style, as it keeps inching towards a pop style. While not completely ditching their nu metal taste, their albums have featured more much lighter feeling songs, and less and less edge on their sound. Starting with songs like “Shadow of The Day”, and really everything on Minutes to Midnight, they have brought softer songs, and really a total departure to a pop rock-ish style.

In the case for their newest track “Heavy,” it seems as though they have completely converted themselves to a pop sound, ditching anything “rock” that the band had previously been known for. If the song suggests anything of the new album, this leaves anticipation of a rock-less, polished electronic pop album. The instrumentation is minimalist, and sounds almost completely computer generated, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Their downfalls, however, lie in the structure and lyrics of the song.

With not much going on in the background, the song seems to rely on the inclusion of the up-and-coming pop singer Kiiara. The singer does not bring much to save the song, and it resembles a pop duet in the vein of The Chainsmoker’s “Closer,” which exemplified the recurring motif of modern pop music: basic and seemingly uninteresting track that is attempted to be revived by new singer that is just as uninteresting. Kiiara’s vocal addition took the majority of the singing role after her awkward introduction in the chorus. Shifting energy very rarely throughout the track, the quickness of its length makes the song go from A to B, and feels like nothing had even happened.

The lyrics are really uninspired, just linking overused lines like “can’t escape the gravity,” “I’m holding on,” and the repetitive “why is everything so heavy,” which is ironic considering the nature of the song. The chorus had potential to save the verses from their simplicity, but is stuck to the repetition of the “why is everything so heavy” line.

For fans of the band, they have some real bad news coming to them. Hopefully the entire album won’t be following this style, as it lacks the feeling that Linkin Park had always packed. Although a change of style isn’t terrible, this song unfortunately doesn’t even work well as a pop song, and certainly works as only filler. Linkin Park has had a history of success and creativity, so it’s hard to blame them for experimentation. The song could possibly find the interest of die hard fans, or maybe fans of modern pop music.

PewDiePie’s ‘Fall’ and Media That Makes Journalists Look Bad

 

Image result for pewdiepie

by Kristina Vakhman

YouTube star Felix Kjellberg, better known as PewDiePie, found himself in the middle of a “scandal” last week when the Wall Street Journal branded him as anti-Semitic.

The Journal’s report featured a compilation of nine of Kjellberg’s videos where he incorporated either Nazi imagery or anti-Semitic humor.

Since then, other news outlets joined in the biggest YouTuber’s condemnation, linking him to a fascist and accusing him of normalizing the alt-right’s controversial views.

The debacle forced Disney’s subsidiary, Maker Studios, to drop their partnership with Kjellberg. Moreover, YouTube cancelled the second season of his YouTube Red show, “Scare PewDiePie,” as well as removed the PewDiePie channel from their Google Preferred advertising program.

Contrary to headlines, Kjellberg has not “fallen” from his dominant YouTube throne. In fact, his 53 million subscriber count has only grown.

Additionally, fellow YouTubers and his fanbase have been quick to point out that the Journal’s video deliberately takes scenes from Kjellberg’s work out of context. It is also edited to make the material seem far darker than what Kjellberg intended in the initial content.

In one video, since deleted from his channel, Kjellberg poked fun at the absurdity of Fiverr.com, where freelancers do practically anything for five dollars. To see how far the vendors would go, Kjellberg put in ridiculous requests, including asking two men to unfurl a banner reading “Death to all Jews” as they danced and laughed in the middle of a jungle.

While others denied Kjellberg’s ludicrous demands and threatened to report him for violating the site’s guidelines, the two men followed through with what he had requested.

In another video, Kjellberg compared the Nazi Party to the YouTube Heroes program, which gives users abilities that can be easily abused, like mass-flagging videos. Kjellberg is seen watching one of Adolf Hitler’s speeches.

The Journal’s depiction of these scenarios completely cuts out the original context. No other sides of the situation are shown, hence perpetuating the narrative that Kjellberg is anti-Semitic. Knowing the full substance of the complete videos sheds new light and dismantles the Journal’s argument.

Instead of examples of anti-Semitism, these instances were Kjellberg’s attempts at shock humor that — even he admits in his apology video — were of bad taste and poorly executed.

Of course, this does not excuse Kjellberg from making such crude jokes.

Maker Studios was right to sever times with him, considering the welcoming, inclusive image that Disney has spent years developing and maintaining. Losing his place on YouTube’s Google Preferred, which deemed his content “family-friendly,” is also understandable; it’s a shock that his channel was listed there in the first place, judging by his material.

However, the media labeling Kjellberg as a fascist or an anti-Semite, and purposely taking his videos out of context to fit that narrative, is not fair; it’s defamation.

Additionally, it undermines the credibility of the press.

With President Donald Trump claiming that any negative media is “fake news,” a situation where a slanderous piece of work can actually be deemed “fake” solidifies the argument. This is evident by the public’s reaction to the Journal’s attack on Kjellberg; while the Journal has long been considered a reputable news source, this one-sided report has caused many to turn away from them and from those that added fire to their flame.

The journalists who conceived the piece received so much hate that they privatized their Twitter accounts; the compilation related to the article has a massive dislike-to-like ratio.

More importantly, marking Kjellberg as the face of the alt-right movement — which he has unequivocally disavowed in numerous statements — is dangerous. It does exactly what the Journal and others accused him of doing: trivializing genuine racism and hatred.

He is a YouTube personality whose jokes went too far; aiming the dart at his forehead when there is an ample amount of actual neo-Nazis and racists scouring the Internet is a mistake.

Instead of pouncing on “edgy” comedy, the media should be focusing on real menaces.

Trump: ‘We Are Going to Deal with DACA with Heart’

by Kristina Vakhman

In a press conference on Feb. 16, President Donald Trump gave no definitive answer when asked about what he would do with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA, stating that it is “a very, very difficult subject,” because “you have these incredible kids — in many cases, not in all cases.”

DACA was enacted through an executive order signed by President Barack Obama in 2012. Under the program, children who entered the United States illegally before the age of 16 have the chance to stay in the U.S. to gain an education or a job.

Renewable protection from deportation is given to these individuals every two years under the conditions that they have no criminal record and are actively pursuing their studies or employment.

According to Pew Research, “more than 750,000 undocumented immigrants have received work permits and deportation relief” as a result of the program.

Central Connecticut State University is just one of a growing number of institutions moving towards the status of a “sanctuary campus” that could face these repercussions.

A sanctuary campus pertains to colleges and universities that adopt policies to protect undocumented students in a similar manner that “sanctuary cities” protect undocumented immigrants.

In December of 2016, President Mark Ojakian of Connecticut State Colleges and Universities (CSCU) wrote in a statement that he was “working with campus leadership, outside legal counsel and national immigration attorneys to understand all options and gather necessary information to make an informed set of decisions about the best path forward.”

Converting CSCU into “sanctuary campuses” was one of the choices President Ojakian mentioned being up for discussion.

He was not ready to officially designate CSCU with “sanctuary” statuses, saying at the time that it is “necessary to understand the impact of such a designation and whether it is appropriate for our system and all of our 85,000 students.”

CCSU Faculty Senate members also expressed their support, conveying in a December meeting resolution that they side with “all individuals on campus to exercise and enjoy in safety and security all of the rights and privileges appropriate to their status as students, staff, or faculty regardless of their immigration status.”

“We’re going to deal with DACA with heart,” said Trump. “The DACA situation is a very, very — it’s a very difficult thing for me because, you know, I love these kids. I love kids. I have kids and grandkids.”

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump threatened to revoke DACA.

His position has changed several times on the issue, with his stance in the Thursday press conference being another example of a pivot.

However, he has followed through on his vow to punish “sanctuary cities,” places in the United States that shield undocumented immigrants from deportation, by signing an executive order that upholds extreme immigration enforcement.

Despite court precedent leaving little room to force local governments to change, the Trump administration is calling for nationwide cooperation, promising to strip “sanctuary cities” of federal funding if they disobey the executive order.

Consequently, higher-education establishments that act as “sanctuaries” for undocumented students could be affected.

Currently, Connecticut legislators are working towards passing a bill that would grant undocumented students financial aid. It was struck down two years ago.

Blue Devils Miss Playoff Deadline

by Humera Gul

Central Connecticut State University’s men’s basketball team played their hearts out, but fell to Robert Morris 74-64. The team was able to cut a 19 point deficit down to just five point, however, it was too little too late.

The team struggled with shooting and finishing plays. Central shot 22 of 60 from the field, 7 of 18 for three pointers, and 13 of 25 at the foul line. The Blue Devils had the crowd roaring during the comeback moments.

“It comes down to guys that haven’t been in this situation before, meaning, the game of this magnitude, and I think we came out nervous,” said Coach Donyell Marshall.

It did take the blue devils some time to settle into the game. Khalen Cumberlander did all he could to win the game for his senior year. Cumberlander made 9 of 17 field goals, including three three pointers. He also scored three out of his six foul shots. He finished with 24 points for the game. He also had five rebounds and one assist. He not only led the team in points scored, but also scored more than any other player in the game.

Coach Marshall had nothing but good things to say about Khalen.
“Khalen has been playing well, he’s been playing a lot harder. I think he was feeling his senior year is on the line and he only had a couple of games left. In the huddles, he was very talkative and became a leader for this team. It’s sad because as a new coach, I only got one year with a guy like that.”

Another Blue Devil that catches the eye is Austin Nehls. Nehls was 3 for 10 in his field goals, included two three pointers. He finished 6 of 9 foul shots. He also was part of an alley-oop, where he passed it to Cumberlander and Cumberlander dunked it. Nehls also had two rebounds and three assists.

Blue Devil’s rookie Tyson Batiste had three rebounds, five assists and two steals.

“Unfortunately, by the time we got clicking and we got going, it was too little too late. We expanded so much energy doing it, but you got to keep working and building on it. We were officially eliminated, but we got two games left and we will try to win those games,” Coach Marshall said.

Isaiah Still of Robert Morris made significant contributions to the game. Still was 6 of 15 in his field goals including a three pointer. He scored a high 9 of 11 on his foul ball, and finished with 22 points for the game. Still also had eight rebounds, two assists and a steal.

Still’s teammate Aaron Tate finished 3 out of 4 from the field and 4 out of 4 on foul shots. He also recorded eight rebounds.

The loss drops CCSU to 5-22 overall and 3-13 in the NEC. This loss eliminates the Blue Devils from playoff contention. CCSU will hosts St. Francis Brooklyn in its final home game of the season and its seniors night. Watch out for Khalen Cumberlander.