Debrosse Delivers at the Plate and in the Field

by Navindra Persaud

Central Connecticut softball has been playing well this year, in no small part to exemplary performance by one of the team’s youngest players: freshman Alexis Debrosse.

Debrosse comes to New Britain by way of New Bedford High School in New Bedford, Mass. where she was named player of the year three times. Continue reading

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“Recess”: Skrillex Releases First Full Length Album

by Sean Begin

Sonny Moore, better known by his alias Skrillex, grabbed the attention of American pop culture in 2010 when he released his YouTube-sampled “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” EP. With songs more reminiscent of angrily arguing Transformers than traditional instrumental music, Moore succeeded in helping take dance music mainstream.

Now, after six years of singles, remixes and extended plays, Moore has released his first full-length effort with “Recess,” an 11 song LP that nods to both the style that made him popular and the influences his music has seen since his ascension.

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Lacrosse Splits First Two of Four Straight Home Games

by Sean Begin

Winning in sports by one is a unique situation. For the losing team, it can be particularly devastating to come up just short of a win. For the winning team, elation at pulling out the win can be a boost of confidence.

In the first two of four straight home conference games, the Central Connecticut women’s lacrosse team experienced both sides of the one-goal game.

The team held off St. Francis (Pa.) to win 11-10 on Friday before falling to Robert Morris 9-8 in sudden victory double overtime Sunday afternoon.

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Ban the Death Penalty

By: Joe Suszczynski

Capital punishment has always been one way with dealing with violent criminals. Sure, they have killed people to receive such a punishment, but is it right to carry out the punishment given? No. The death penalty in the United States should be prohibited in all cases.

There is no point in discussing the morality of the death penalty because it can be debated until the end of time.

Facts are the only way to determine whether or not capital punishment should be abolished in America.

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Miss CCSU

By: Devin Leith-Yessian

Simone Brown, a student at CCSU, was crowned at Miss CCSU, a pageant put on by Women’s Involved Now and the Black Student Union.
“This pageant’s very different,” said Cynthia Calderon, the organizer of the pageant. The pageant stressed looking past superficial beauty and focusing on the personality and talents of the woman.
The pageant was composed of two sections, one where the contestants spoke on a social issue of their choosing, followed by a talent portion.
The issues the contestants spoke about ranged from the lack of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) fields to relationship abuse. “I truly fear for our future if this continues,” said Victoria Hellberg, who spoke on violence and discrimination against members of the LGBT community. “We are all one in the same.”
The talent portion was launched with a taekwondo exercise put on by Calderon’s father, Calderon being a second degree black belt herself. He led a small group of children as they displayed their skills through practicing on him and each other. The presentations which were met with the strongest reactions from the crowd were a self-defense tutorial put on by Alleah Red and a monologue acted out by Brown, which she created herself.
In the monologue, Brown played the role of a fictitious woman describing the abuse she had faced from her husband to a man who was only described as having hit a woman. After the woman told her husband that she was pregnant, he threw her down the stairs telling her that he didn’t want to bring a child into this messed up world. The husband became an alcoholic after his brother was killed. The audience listened with frequent gasps and fascinated silence.
Red’s performance involved her teaching how to respond to the most common ways women are often attacked. To show how to react to being grabbed from behind she threw her partner over her back, causing him to lose his breath and eliciting concerned gasps from the crowd. After he got back on his feet she demonstrated how to throw an attacker off yourself when they have you pinned to the ground, again seemingly effortlessly tossing him aside.
The pageant was not without it’s difficulties, however. The taekwondo exercise lacked an introduction that provided context, causing it to feel disjointed and out of place in relation to the rest of the pageant. CCSU student Crystal Lopez took issue with the contestants, and female students in general, being referred to as women, rather than girls. Lopez also said that she believed that it lacked organization, with occasional mishaps occurring throughout the show.
“It wasn’t smooth sailing all the way,” said Spencer Perry, the president of WIN. However she does think that “it was a fantastic experience” especially for a first event. She hopes to turn this into an annual event with continuing collaboration with the BSU.
WIN has been around for years, but was just restarted this semester. The pageant is their first event in this reincarnation. The BSU, which co-sponsored the event is a student run organization who’s goal is “to develop a black consciousness at CCSU and to improve the cultural and social development of black students,” according to their web page.
Despite coming in expecting the pageant to be lackluster, afterwards Lopez said “The event was very touching, I cried a few times.”

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Inexpensive Travel How To: Destination: Block Island

By: Arianna Cecchini

With the cold New England weather subsiding and the warm weather approaching, a great place for college students to go right here in CT is Block Island. To get to Block Island one can take a ferry from New London, CT which is about an hour to an hour and a half away.

Now, there are two different ferry boats across the water to the island, one that is about an hour ride and the other being about 25 minutes. It costs around $22-35 a person round-trip, depending on the speed of the boat. Once you get to the island, it is just a gorgeous site. You pull up to a beach front with shops, hotels and restaurants, all of which are quaint and very beautifully New England themed.

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Minimum Graduation Credits Lowered

By Acadia Otlowski

Students may soon need fewer credits to graduate.

The Faculty Senate passed a proposal to reduce the number of classes required for graduation from 122 credits to 120 credits, effective for students who are matriculating in the Fall 2014 semester.

The measure originally called for the two credit reduction to occur in the area of unrestricted electives. A motion was made to amend the resolution, striking the paragraph that mentioned the area from which the credits would be taken.  This took the place of another amendment, which suggested that the two credit loss be either in the unrestricted elective or in the form of the physical education class, PE 144. This amendment was voted down and the new amendment took its place.

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Google Glass Available to Public Tomorrow for 24 Hours

By Kevin Jachimowicz

Google has just the thing for the American public to spend their entire tax return on.

The Google eyeglasses-slash-wearable computing product, simply dubbed “Google Glass”, has a small prism display that projects images to the wearer’s right eye. The device has gained huge amounts of notoriety in the past months. Strange incidents such as people filming others at bars with Google Glass has caused fights, thefts, confusion to others and personal attacks on those wearing the product publicly.

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PEZ Factory in Orange, CT Makes for a Great Trip

By: Arianna Cecchini

I bet most of you CCSU students didn’t know that right here in Connecticut is the PEZ factory. It’s only about 30 minutes away from CCSU, located in Orange. So, as the weekends here at CCSU are becoming limited, get in the car with some friends and go do something far out of the ordinary.

The awesome thing about the PEZ factory would have to be the price of admission. It is only $5 to get in, and the best part everyone gets a $2 redemption to spend at their gift shop, so you get FREE PEZ! What’s better than free? Pretty much nothing.

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Torp Theater Becomes Semi-Real World for Mr. CCSU

By Kevin Jachimowicz

 

Last thursday, the Inter Residence Council Presented: The Semi-Real World, Mr. CCSU, in Torp Theater, where eight contestants participated in eight events and were judged to see who would take home the crown as the new Mr. CCSU.

 

Groups of people huddled around in the hallways which separate Torp Theaer and Founders Hall, eating slices of pizza and chugging refreshments prior to entering, some even had their pictures taken against a screen prior to going in to sit and watch the event. CCSU Senior Jeremy DeRoy said that he “came all the way from Vermont with his girlfriend to be here.” Blue Chips were swiped to grant you access, everyone was given a name tag – including staff members and audience members – and the theater went dark at 10 PM sharp. “Show will be starting in approximately five minutes, thank ya,” a female voiced over the sound system, who was later revealed as one of the hosts, Laura May.

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A User’s Newest Euphoria?

By: Brittany Hill

With a person dying every 36 minutes from an opioid overdose, there is no question why the Food and Drug Administration willingly approved an anti-overdose drug last week.

The single-dose injection, Evzio, counteracts the body’s reaction to an opioid, reversing the effects such as a lowered heart rate or loss of consciousness.

Evzio is a naloxone drug, which acts as an opioid antagonist and is commonly used to treat overdoses. Its active ingredients bind to the brain’s receptors stronger than those of an opioid. This reverses the effects of an overdose that may otherwise cause death.

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Rental Cars Out, Rental Bikes In

By: Jacqueline Stoughton

Central Connecticut State University has begun plans to install a new bike share program on campus, where various bike racks filled with rental bikes would be installed all around campus accessible by all.

The bike racks would allow students to take a bike off one rack and ride it to another part of campus and put it back on another near by bike rack.

The bike share program is projected to begin within a 2015-2016 time frame, assuming that a study testing its usefulness is first successful.  Facilitators are aiming for this to take off shortly after the official opening of the CTFastrak.

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The Wrongful Occupation of Hawai’i

By Kevin Jachimowicz

 

Last Wednesday evening, Keala Kelly, prize-winning writer and director of the documentary film, “Noho Hewa: The Wrongful Occupation of Hawai’i”, held a viewing and discussion session for her film and its sometimes controversial standpoints.

In the Hawaiian language, hewa means “wrong” and noho means “to occupy”. The documentary is a contemporary look at Hawaiian people, politics and resistance in the face of their systematic erasure under U.S. laws, economics, militarism and real estate speculation. “Noho Hewa” promises to deliver what ‘the tourists don’t see; the government won’t say … the truth about hawai’i.’

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Style Springs Up Around Campus for New Season

Kiley Krzyzek

 

 

Spring has finally sprung, and that means spring style! Students are ready for warm weather with their summery shorts and long skirts. Take looks inspired by the catwalk and music festivals straight to campus.

 

Bold colors such as reds, oranges and blues are popping up like flowers. Solid colors emphasize the shape of the clothes, whereas patterns such as stripes and floral print catch the eye.

 

For ladies, tops are getting smaller while skirt lengths are extending. Asymmetrical skirts are shorter in the front and draped longer in the back, making for a pretty silhouette. Donna Karen had a lot of tribally-printed, asymmetrical skirts in her ready-to-wear spring 2014 collection. SXSW attendees in Texas rocked asymmetrical skirts with cowboy boots.

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STEM Majors Gain Merit; Others Left Behind

By Ruth Bruno

CCSU students majoring in areas of math and science could find themselves in a new school by next semester.

A proposal to create a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) School has been approved by the president of CCSU, Faculty Senate and each department that would become part of the new school. The STEM School will include five departments that are currently in the Carrol A. Ammon School of Arts and Sciences. These departments will merge with the existing School of Engineering and Technology to create the new School.

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With Playoffs Looming, Pacers Need to Find Offense

by Navindra Persaud

When the Miami Heat defeated the Indiana Pacers last Friday, it showed quite a bit of weakness in the Pacers offense. As things stand, the Pacers are in the number two spot in the Eastern Conference but they will need to figure out a way to get past the offensive slump that they have been in lately.

There has been very little effective ball movement from the Pacers on the offensive end, and they are very fortunate to at least have the number two seed. They may survive the first round of the NBA playoffs, but may not make it out of the second round if they have to face the Chicago Bulls, who have really put together a stellar season, given the circumstances following Derrick Rose’s season ending injury and other ailing players.

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Baby, If You Were Words On a Page, You’d Be Fine Print

During my freshman year of college I was approached by a guy on campus and asked in a very serious tone, “How much does a polar bear weigh?” Confused and a little taken aback I said that I did not know. He then cracked a grin, extended his hand and said “enough to break the ice”, and introduced himself.  I was on the receiving end of a pickup line and you know what, I thought it was great.

We’ve all seen a movie or television show that portrays some poor, awkward guy standing alone at a bar, trying to muster up the courage to approach an attractive individual and spark a conversation only to stumble over a corny pickup line that results in either a dirty look or a drink thrown in his face.

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SGA Bullet Points 4/9

By Joe Suszczynski

  •  Senator Abdallah Alsaqri motioned to allocate no more than $400 to purchase Student Government Association graduation stoles. It was later amended to say that the senators graduating have to pay at least $18. A stole cost $34 and the rationale was that the graduating senators had to pay at least $18 due to it being at least 51% of the cost. The motion passed with 17 “yes” votes, seven “no” votes, and three “abstain” votes.
  •  A motion was made to allocate $6,500, later amended to $6,400 due to typo, to the Student Life Committee from SG9010 for the It’s Not Easy Being Green event. The motion passed with 25 “yes” votes and two “abstain” votes.
  •  A motion was made and passed with 24 “yes” votes and two “abstain votes to allocate $400 from SG9195 for coffee talks on the smoke free campus.
  •  A motion was made to allocate $2886 to the Center Stage revenue account. It passed with 27 “yes” votes, six “no” votes, and one “abstain” votes.

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Baseball’s Replay Pains

by Sean Begin

The 2014 baseball season comes with a major shift in the way games are umpired: for the first time ever, instant replay will be used extensively throughout the game.

But three weeks into the season, it’s already facing major obstacles.

In a game between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees over the weekend, the Yankees Dean Anna was showed on the TV broadcast to have clearly been tagged out, even though the initial ruling was safe. But after Sox manager John Farrell challenged the call, instead of being overturned it was confirmed.

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YG’s Debut Provides Modern Taste of Long-Missing West Coast Sound

By Kevin Jachimowicz

 

“My Krazy Life,” by rapper YG, is a surprisingly good listen. Pitchfork recently scored the album with a solid 8.1, which has been described as “deserved” by many. YG’s right hand man, DJ, and producer majority of the time, DJ Mustard, currently have ten tracks on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States. The album marks a pivotal point for the duo; Mustard’s production and YG’s songwriting are making their way into the mainstream and onto radio waves throughout the country.

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Community Garden Yields Opportunity

By: Jacqueline Stoughton

Students at Central Connecticut State University are teaming up to build a community garden on campus.

The garden will be located on the Paul Manafort Drive side of Copernicus garage where faculty, staff and students will be able to obtain their own plot of the garden to grow and harvest whatever they desire.

“The Garden of Eaten’,” as it will be called, will be 2,500 square feet of growing space.   The total area is about 3,000-4,000 square feet; most of that space will be constructed into walking space.  There’s also an area next to the growing soil that is full of gravel that could potentially be transformed into extended growing space in the future.

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Wethersfield Resident Represents USA in Perth, Australia

By Kevin Jachimowicz

Adam Stankiewicz, 20, a Wethersfield resident and junior, partaking in the University of Hartford’s Web Design & Development program, has garnered an impressive amount of attention recently, and for good reason – he’s the youngest active member of the United States Boomerang Team.

Stankiewicz is also an important member of the Wandering Nutmeg Boomerang Society, due in part to his assistance in giving them a web presence. His roles for them include Designer & Developer, SEO Specialist and Copywriter. Stankiewicz, a Haddam, CT native, is currently partaking in the World Boomerang Cup in Australia until the 23rd of this month as a member of the U.S. national team. In 2014, 25 countries maintain national boomerang organizations, with a World Boomerang Championship held every two years.

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Pulitzer Prizes Validate Role of Journalism

The Washington Post and The Guardian were awarded the Pulitzer Prize for public service on Monday for their work reporting the National Security Agency spying scandal that rocked the country. Based on documents leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, both papers revealed the widespread effort undertaking by the NSA and US government to spy on American citizens in an attempt to prevent future 9/11-esque threats.

The award echoes the one given to The New York Times in 1971 for its publication of the Pentagon Papers leaked by Daniel Ellsberg that revealed the secret history of the Vietnam War and the false information fed to the public by the government.

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Documentary Exposes State’s Racial Bias

By Ruth Bruno

Only 11 percent of Connecticut’s population is African-American, yet they make up 42 percent of the state’s prison inmates, according to Lubbie Harper Jr., Connecticut Supreme Court Justice and Chair of the Commission, who spoke before the screening of the documentary “The Color of Justice.”

CCSU students and visitors gathered on Tuesday, April 1, to watch a screening of  the documentary and voice their opinions about Connecticut’s juvenile justice system.

Harper went on to say that Hispanics make up 14 percent of Connecticut’s population, yet they accounted for 26 percent of Connecticut inmates.

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Netflix It: “Friday Night Lights”

By Ariana D’Avanzo

Crowds of howling fans cheering, popcorn being thrown amongst the packed bleachers and arguments happening left and right about who’s the better team: the environment of a football game. Then, suddenly, in the midst of the game, the fans fall silent and let out a big roaring gasp in unison, something happens that no one saw coming. This personifies the first episode of the very first season of “Friday Night Lights”.

Love triangles, relatable family drama and football. If you enjoy watching a series containing all three of these, then “Friday Night Lights” is for you.

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Inexpensive Travel How To: Destination: Mohegan Sun

By: Arianna Cecchini

As most of CCSU is not the legal age to go to a casino, one does’t necessarily think to go to Mohegan Sun when looking to get away from campus. Mohegan Sun is not all about the slot machines and poker tables though. Mohegan offers a wide variety of activities for any age of person. Inside the casino they offer a shopping mall of awesome stores and great restaurants at affordable prices. Stores such as American Candle, Things Remembered, Dylan’s Candy Bar and many others have great gifts for others or even yourself.

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‘Captain America’ Saves Day in Sequel

By: Joe Suszczynski

 

Marvel has been doing a fantastic job with the series of movies they have continued to release since 2008. The Marvel cinematic universe has a unique way of showcasing their heroes, by giving these heroes individual movies, prior to bringing them together, like in the 2012 blockbuster, “The Avengers.” Post-Avengers, the franchise returned to individual films, most recently with “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” with the intention to mount anticipation for an upcoming “Avengers” movie in May 2015.

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Professor Has Natural Vision

By Ruth Bruno

Dr. Richard Benfield has a unique vision for improving the CCSU campus for both students and faculty.

“I would like to see our campus much more oriented toward a plant focus. I think everyone would,” said Benfield, a geography professor.

Looking out his office window in the Social Sciences Hall, Benfield motioned toward an area of dirt between Welte Hall and the Student Center.

“Why have we not [planted] daffodils there?” asked Benfield. “A bulb costs about 38 cents and you can plant them, leave them; they’ll come up every year.”

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Medicine Misrepresents Minorities

By: Brittany Hill

It’s pretty straightforward: if you need a solution, find to the root of the problem.

So if its known that blacks have the highest death rate and shortest survival for most cancers, why are they, along with other non-whites, the focus of only two percent of clinical cancer studies nationwide?

Some statistics harbor no discrimination; they are gathered for objectives that are irrespective of race, gender or ethnicity. But in the medical field, where there is no atypical patient, diversity is vital in research.

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SGA Treasurer Kory Mills

SGA Bullet Points 4/2

SGA Treasurer Kory Mills

SGA Treasurer Kory Mills

By Joe Suszczynski

  •  President Brian Choplick passed the chair to Treasurer Kory Mills in order to speak on a motion to change Section 1-5 of the Student Government Association by-laws regarding “Safe-Zone Training.” The motion passed with 24 “yes” votes and four “abstain” votes. The by-laws now read that every senator and officer will have to attend “Safe-Zone Training” or some type of equivalent service deemed by the Vice-President, or vote of the majority of Senate. And failing to comply with that will result in a loss of stipend.
  •  Another motion regarding semantics in the SGA by-laws was made. The proposal was to say that two-thirds of the Senate must be present at the time voting for committee chairs and co-chairs takes place. The motion passed with 26 “yes” votes and one “abstain” vote.
  •  On open floor, a motion was made to approve the line-item change for the Geology and Planetary Science club. $190 would be moved from their museum trip to pay for a field trip. The motion was passed with 25 “yes votes to three “no” votes and one “abstain” votes.
  •  A motion was made to allocate the Student Life committee $400 in support for an event called the Day of Silence. It passed with 26 “yes” votes and two “abstain” votes.

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Baseball Splits Weekend Series with the Mount

by Sean Begin

The Central Connecticut baseball team headed into the weekend, and their first conference series, on the heels of back-to-back victories to even their record at 7-7.

That .500 winning percentage stayed in place after the team went 2-2 in it’s weekend series against Mount St. Mary’s, winning Friday’s game and the first game on Saturday before dropping the last two.

“We got ourselves started…this weekend and haven’t done anything to jeopardize our goal to be in the top four,” said head coach Charlie Hickey, following Sunday’s finale. “[We] had an opportunity today to come out and win a series and gain a tiebreaker and we ended up on the short end of a 6-5 game.”

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Summer Courses Benefits Students

By Jacqueline Stoughton

Registration for summer 2014 classes is happening now, presenting students with many opportunities and benefits allowing them to catch up, get ahead in class or simply raise their GPA.

“I think there are a number of benefits that summer classes offer.  First, if the student is struggling with the subject, they might find that summer classes are smaller and they’d get more individual attention from the professor,” said Katherine Hermes, chair of the history department.

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Friends Come and Go

By: Paige Brown

Friends. The people you laugh and cry with. The people you make memories with. You lose many, and keep few. Some are temporary and some are lifelong.

Recently, I was told something that has stuck with me.

“The friends you make later in your life are the ones who will stay in your life.”

My uncle told me this during a conversation when I mentioned that I don’t really talk to or know anyone from high school anymore.

When I was younger, I had a lot of friends. Now, those people that I was forced to be with, when life was easy and we all had nothing to do but go to school and play together, are no where.

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Annual Charity Drag Ball is Success with Huge Turnout

By: Kiley Krzyzek

The annual Drag Ball for charity took place during last Thursday inside of the Devils Den at 10pm. Both professional drag queens and student amateurs volunteered to perform to a song, which consisted of: posing, dancing, strutting around, and interacting with the cheering crowd who threw dollar bills in their direction. The event, which was sponsored by Pride and raised money for Hartford Gay and Lesbian Health Collective was a huge success, and a blast for everyone who was in attendance, which was a huge turn out.

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Handler Leaving E!, Negotiating with CBS for Late Night Show

By Kevin Jachimowicz

 

About two weeks ago, Chelsea Handler abruptly went public with her choice to depart from the E! network when her contract expires at the bottom of this year, bringing an unexpected close to her talk show “Chelsea Lately” – which was successfully and continuously broadcasted on E! for eight years. A week after Handler’s announcement, David Letterman announced on CBS’s “The Late Show” that he would be retiring from hosting duties for the show, which he has maintained since the debut of the program in 1993.

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Let Smokers Smoke

By: Joe Suszczynski

In early February, Senator Chris Murphy sent Central Connecticut State University President, Jack Miller, a letter regarding his initiative to make CCSU a tobacco free campus. In the letter, he stated that United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) started the Tobacco-Free College Campus Initiative in September 2012. Murphy cited the American Nonsmokers’ Rights Foundation saying nearly 1,200 campuses are smoke-free with 811 of them being tobacco free. Also, in the letter, Murphy cited all the statistics regarding the use of tobacco ranging from how many deaths it causes every year to how much it costs in healthcare.

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UCONN R.A. Tries to Calm a Crowd; Backfires

In the days leading up to the final match between the two UConn basketball teams, a resident assistant sent a sharply worded to those who live on his floor.

The email, simply signed Derek, informed residents on his floor that any celebration of the games would not be tolerated.

“I’m on duty tonight and it’s going to be stressful, so please don’t push it on our floor,” said Derek. This request was fair enough, but what followed turned from a simple request to downright insulting.

In the end, remember that the only reason you care about the game is:
a.) because they’re wearing a UConn uniform
b.) you want an excuse to go wild

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A Tiger Sensing His End?

by Sean Begin

A piece of news surfaced on April Fool’s Day that, at first glance, seemed to fit the theme of the day. As I was perusing Twitter, I saw a headline that announced Tiger Wood’s would miss the Masters.

Tiger not at the Masters? That hasn’t happened in nearly two full decades. Someone had to have made up this rumor.

But after some digging, I saw the news had come from the man himself, when he announced through his website that he had undergone microdiscectomy surgery to fix back pain caused by a pinched nerve.

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Love & Hip Hop Star Shot Amid His Mother’s Funeral Procession

By Kevin Jachimowicz

A Randolph, Massachusetts man who allegedly fired multiple times at his rapper and reality TV star uncle Raymond “Benzino” Scott during a weekend funeral procession for Benzino’s mother will be back in a Plymouth court Wednesday for a hearing to determine if he is too dangerous to be granted the privilege of bail.

Gai Scott, 36, is charged with assault, intent to murder in the shooting of his own uncle, Raymond “Benzino” Scott. Benzino was the co-founder of the once popular “The Source” hip-hop magazine, was a member of the hip hop group “Made Men” and had a decade long feud (stemming from articles in “The Source”) with Eminem.

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Initiatives Towards a Greener Campus

By: Jacqueline Stoughton

Central Connecticut State University has done a lot in the past seven years since President Jack Miller signed the President’s Climate Commitment.  Since then, the rest of the CSU system has also signed the commitment to create carbon neutrality on campus.

CCSU has already taken major steps to making Central a green campus.  The university has set goals that include reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 20 percent by 2015, 50 percent by 2020 and ending with the ultimate goal of reducing fossil fuel emissions 100 percent.

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Too Young to Stress College Debt

College is expensive; everyone knows that. And it isn’t getting any cheaper. Tuition all over the country is only increasing and so is the number of students stressed about it.

H&R Block recently put out a press release highlighting the amount of stress that teens have about finances. The survey that they conducted consisted of about 1,000 teenagers between 13 and 17 years old, focusing on the financial mind-set of young adults.

It was found that eight out of 10 teenagers are worried about finding a good job and 78 percent are already worried about their potential student loan debt.

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Internet Brings Change to a Movement

Robin Morgan informed a crowded room of students of the battles she and many others have fought against the discrimination they face in the digital world.

Robin Morgan informed a crowded room of students of the battles she and many others have fought against the discrimination they face in the digital world.

By Kiley Krzyzek

Anna was forced to relive the harassment she encountered at her job offline, on her professional network online.

At Anna’s first job out of college, her boss sexually assaulted her.  The young woman, whose last name was not shared, left the job and, while searching for a new one on LinkedIn, her former boss stalked her profile. Anna alerted LinkedIn of the problem. The organization did nothing to stop the abuse. They argued that, since the nature of their website was all about connecting, there was no option to block users. Anna then turned to a different website, Change.org, and created a petition, explaining her situation and gaining support. Soon after, LinkedIn changed its policy to support more privacy.

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A&E Television

Bates Motel Checks in for Second Season

By Navindra Persaud

 

Robert Bloch’s novel, Psycho, has been revamped by creator Anthony Cipriano and the A&E network to present Bates Motel, the prequel to Alfred Hitchcock’s movie adaption of the novel of the same name.

 

The show, which is now in the midst of its second season, promises to be just as disturbing as Hitchcock’s 1960 thriller Psycho: depicting the strange relationship between mother and son, Norma and Norman Bates.

 

In the first season, viewers were introduced to Norman, played by Freddie Highmore, who experiences a psychotic break – the family is forced to move after he unconsciously kills his father. Norma, played by Vera Farmiga, is able to save her son from law enforcement by framing the murder to look as if it were an accident.

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SGA Bullet Points 3/26

By Joe Suszczynski

  • Some members of the Student Government Association went to the Conference on Student Government Association (COSGA) at Texas A&M University and told the rest of the student government their individual experiences that they learned while attending along with ideas to be used in the CCSU SGA.
  • A motion was made to pass the Finance Committee by-law changes to the club funding section regarding how much percentage of the budget goes to funding clubs, how much SGA has for its operation accounts, and how much SGA has on reserves. The change in percentages mainly increased how much the SGA can fund, decreasing the amount the SGA has in reserve and how much they have on hand as operating funds. The motion passed with 29 “yes” votes and three “abstain” votes.
  • A representative of the Black Student Union made a brief statement for a line item exchange to take some money out of an account to fund an event they plan on doing — requesting $540. $320 would go to set up the event while $200 would go to paying a photographer. This passed when the motion was made to accept it.
  • Maxwell Vaughn, President of the Men’s Volleyball Club, presented a contingency request asking the SGA for $1,068.13 for hotel rooms because they qualified for regionals that will be taking place in Durham, New Hampshire on March 29-30. A motion was later made to accept the contingency, which ended up passing.
  • A motion was made to allocate $3,000 to the A Capella Society for Divisi’s fundraising loan going towards their Cd Production. The only stipulation, however, is that Divisi will held responsible if they do not pay back the loan by the end of the 2014-2015 fiscal year. The motion passed with 28 “yes” and three “abstain” votes.

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Writer’s Block: The Column That Almost Wasn’t

Writers block. We all suffer from it, whether it’s a book report for your English class or the Editor’s Column for the newspaper.

I have it.

Each week, I write a column for this paper, which means each week I need to think of something to write. I like to write about topics that I am passionate about but sometimes the passion can be in short supply, especially on a tired, sick Monday night.

When nothing of particular interest catches my eye or intrigues me or if I don’t have a strong, fighting opinion, I don’t like to waste my time or my reader’s time writing 600 words that lack a real point.

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Miss World Defends Women’s Rights

By Ariana D’Avanzo

Linor Abargil was 18-years-old when she was abducted, raped and stabbed by an Israeli travel agent who was supposed to drop her off at the airport.

The CCSU Hillel Jewish Organization hosted a screening of the documentary, “Brave Miss World,” on Tuesday, March 26, at 7:00 p.m. in Torp Theatre. For a total of 99 minutes, the viewers were taken on the journey of the life of Linor Abargil, a surviving rape victim.

Abargil was in Milan, Italy after she won the title of Miss Israel in March of 1998. She had decided to pursue a career in modeling. Soon after arriving in Italy, Abargil became homesick and was driven to the airport by a travel agent, Uri Nor Shlomo, who then raped her. Several weeks later, Abargil won the Miss World Competition.

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Smells Like a Tribute

by Joseph Suszczynski, Acadia Otlowski and Sean Begin

Twenty years ago this Saturday, rock lost an icon. Kurt Cobain was one of the most influential musicians to emerge in the 1990s. He made an impact with his music that was, in a way, an extension of his heart.

Cobain captured the angst of an era. Nirvana emerged from the ashes of disco music and hair metal with a new style. The band is often attributed to being a founder of grunge.

Grunge was dirtier, grimier than its predecessors, and Nirvana, along with bands like Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and Alice in Chains, brought this style out of suburban Seattle and into the mainstream.

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Don’t Worry, It’s Killing You

By Acadia Otlowski

Do not stress your stress.

This advice stems from a TED (Technology, Engineering and Design) talk given by Kelly McGonigal, a health psychologist who, up until recently, taught that stress is only negative.

“For years I’ve been telling people, stress makes you sick. It increases the risk of everything from the common cold to cardiovascular disease. Basically, I’ve turned stress into the enemy. But I have changed my mind about stress, and today, I want to change yours,” said McGonigal in her speech.

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Wesley Stace Explores Music Industry in “Wonderkid”

By Kevin Jachimowicz

“The wonder kids? Where are they now? Remember those guys?” were a few of the first words sputtered on Wednesday, March 26th as Wesley Stace, author, also known as a singer/songwriter by stage-name John Wesley Harding, gave a free reading of excepts from his latest novel, “Wonderkid” in Marcus White Living Room to a large crowd that could not help itself from leaking into the hallways. The book is about a rock band that is faced with the concept of selling out.

“Wonderkid” is a comedic, yet realistic and sometimes poignant glimpse into the adventures of an indie rock band that ends up repackaged as a kids’ (‘kindie’) pop group, in the 1980s. Stace traces the band’s origin to the childhood of two English brothers known as Blake and Jack. The band’s story is narrated by Sweet, a young teen who, at the novel’s opening, almost literally falls into the band’s lap as he desperately attempts to make a getaway after shoplifting from a nearby record store. Sweet is miserable with his foster parents and his lifestyle, and Blake soon adopts him, bringing him on board to sell merchandise for the band at some of the very first Wonderkid concerts. Of course, this was before they make their big debut in America, before they were repackaged by their label as a band for kids, or a ‘kindie’ band, much to the band members’ unpleasant surprise. Not only does Stace hit this A&R nail right on the head, he also offers a real insider’s look into life on tour, including (along with the sex and drugs) the sheer tedium of life on the road, which can help make for a recipe of reckless behavior. “The first bad idea — was to watch [the] movie on acid,” Stace said, impersonating a character who was listing some poorly made choices.

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Kelle Groom holds a copy of her book, I Wore the Ocean in the Shape of a Girl.

Kelle Groom: Recalling Through Poetry

Kelle Groom holds a copy of her book, I Wore the Ocean in the Shape of a Girl.

Kelle Groom holds a copy of her book, I Wore the Ocean in the Shape of a Girl.

 

By Kiley Krzyzek

The Helix, Central’s literary magazine, sponsored a reading by award-winning poet Kelle Groom in the Marcus White Living room on Thursday.

Groom wrote a memoir entitled “I Wore the Ocean in the Shape of a Girl.” Her books of poems are entitled “Five Kingdoms,” “Luckily” and “Underwater City.” Students, faculty and the public had the opportunity to hear excerpts from her books along with personalized narratives of how the readings came to be.

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Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist Bashes Government Surveillance

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By Ruth Bruno

The CCSU Youth for Socialist Action (YSA) hosted a conference initiated in part by the CT Coalition to Stop Indefinite Detention. Daniel Piper, a founding member of the CT Coalition and a member of the CCSU YSA outlined the goals of the conference saying it was held to “Bring people together who are struggling against various attacks on their rights and freedoms and create an atmosphere where they can learn more about what everyone else is going through.”

The keynote address was given by Chris Hedges, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and former reporter for the New York Times. Hedges spoke critically of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) referring to the agency as a “small secret surveillance committee of goons and thugs hiding behind the mask of patriotism.”

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Beginning of the End for NCAA?

by Sean Begin

For years there have been small cracks building in the seemingly impenetrable walls of the NCAA cartel and its monopoly on the multi-billion dollar business of college sports.

On March 26, the director of Region 13 of the National Labor Relations Board, Peter Sung Ohr, ruled that football players at Northwestern University could legally be considered university employees and, therefore, could form a union in order to bargain with the school.

The foundation of college sports — the so-called “student-athlete” myth and the concept of amateurism — now suddenly, and perhaps irrevocably, faces collapse.

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“House of Lies” Unleashes Original Songs on Inaugural Soundtrack Compilation

By Kevin Jachimowicz

Two time Grammy-nominee (“American Beauty”, “Shrek 2″), Music Supervisor and DJ, Chris Douridas, partnered up with Grammy-winning Producer Larry Klein to release a 12-track compilation for the Showtime drama-comedy series “House of Lies,” digitally, via the Strange Cargo/Manhattan Records imprint of Capitol Music Group, earlier this month  (March 4th, specifically). The release is a compilation of the best pieces from the first three seasons of the show.

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Not-So-Mary Jane

By: Brittany Hill

There is a new face to the average marijuana user in America. Or is there?

Whether it is medicinal or recreational, the stigmatized substance is slowly making its way into the hands of anyone who wants it. But the feds are not having it.

The discrepancy between state and federal law has created unfortunate and conflicting actions for medical marijuana recipients. The Federal Drug Enforcement Administration classifies marijuana as a Schedule I drug, next to LSD and heroin, while 20 states and the District of Columbia have legalized it as medicinal.

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Inexpensive Travel How To. Destination: Salem

By: Arianna Cecchini

When you hear the year 1692, what comes to mind? Probably not much, unless you’re a history major or fanatic. But one of the most remarkable historical events in history happened in 1692, and not too far from the CCSU campus. The Salem Witch Trials happened in 1692, and as a college student looking for something to do, one can get a glimpse into this horrifying and remarkable event for a low cost.

Salem, MA is only about a two hour drive from CCSU, so pack some friends into the car and head up for a weekend of spooky fun. Salem offers great hotels all around the area for extremely low prices of about $80-100 a night. The hotels are top quality also — names such as The Marriott and Hilton. The only time those prices sky rocket is in October. If money is an issue, avoid the month of October, or try to go very early in the month if you would like to participate in the Halloween festivities.

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Everyone Loves an Underdog

by Navindra Persaud

Everyone loves a story of an underdog rising to the top while going through tough competition. These stories are what make the NCAA tournament so interesting and exciting for college basketball fans, and this year it happened to come from a place that many overlooked: Stephen F. Austin.

No, it’s not the name of a specific player, but the university that had the makings of a good ole Cinderella story. After defeating an excellent VCU team 77-75 in overtime two weeks ago, the SFA Lumberjacks began to make a statement for being a serious contender in the NCAA Tournament.

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Softball Sweeps Sacred Heart to Open NEC Play

Messina:Debrosse vs SHU (3-29-14) (Ernestina Souza)

 

by Sean Begin

The Central Connecticut softball team was looking for a fast start to conference play this season. Thanks to a sweep of Sacred Heart on Saturday, and some timely weather postponing all other Northeast Conference games, the Blue Devils now sit firmly in first place.

“It’s huge,” said acting head coach Breanne Gleason. “In this conference, with us dropping two teams, every win is going to count. I told the girls we have to go at every single team.”

“We want to host it here, we want to play here, and we want to make it to the tournament,” added senior Laura Messina. “And that means we have to win every game. No let up.”

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Letter to the Editor

To The Editor:

A previous edition of this paper included a letter to the editor from senator on the Student Government. In this letter, the senator was upset with the “blatant waste” that has been occurring within our Student Government. This senator has failed to mention several key details.

Our Student Government Association is not in the business to “blatantly waste” student activity fees. Throughout this semester each committee, including the Finance Committee, has been hard at work helping improve our wonderful school. No senator joins SGA for personal gain or benefit. We all work hard to resolve issues, and make better our school.

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Baseball Splits Series Against Pirates

by Sean Begin

Despite the blustering wind and cold rain on Saturday, the Central Connecticut baseball team squeezed in both games of their scheduled double header against Seton Hall.

The Blue Devils took the first game, shortened to seven innings on account of the weather, 1-0 before dropping the full nine-inning second game 2-0.

“That’s why you don’t predict anything. You sort of get routines and you go about your business,” said head coach Charlie Hickey on the team getting both games played. “At the end of the day it was good for us to get out and play again.”

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Dominic Severino threw six shutout innings on Tuesday to earn his first win of the season.

Baseball Survives Ninth Inning Rally

Dominic Severino threw six shutout innings on Tuesday to earn his first win of the season.

Dominic Severino threw six shutout innings on Tuesday to earn his first win of the season.

Central Connecticut baseball, on the arm and shoulder of junior Dominic Severino, held UMass-Lowell at bay for most of the brisk and sunny Tuesday afternoon, before surviving a pair of ninth-inning home runs to edge the Riverhawks 4-3.

“The plan was today to get him [Severino] a chance to warm up properly and get out there and try and get some innings under the belt, not trying to pitch in the eighth inning with a one run lead or a tie ball game,” said head coach Charlie Hickey. “Doing that allowed him a little chance to breath. He established the ball down in the strike zone. They let him off the hook once or twice when he was a little sloppy but all-in-all he was able to give us six quality innings.”

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Another Astronomical Breakthrough for Science?

By: Joe Suszczynski

 

The science community is once again in the process of making a potential landmark discovery. A video was uploaded to YouTube of Dr. Andrei Linde, a theoretical physicist at Stanford University, being greeted by colleague, Dr. Chau-Lin Kuo, with a surprise that his theory of cosmic inflation, which theorized in the 1980s, was proven to be correct. Linde was in absolute shock when he was told the news, while his wife, who is also a physics professor, hugged Kuo. The three then celebrated with a glass of champagne.

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Rick Ross Tops Charts Fifth Straight Time with ‘Mastermind’

By Kevin Jachimowicz

The comparison Pete Cashmore of NME.com made in regards to Rick Ross’ newest release, “Mastermind,” could not have hit it any more on the ball. Cashmore compared Ross’ latest work to that of the film “The Wolf of Wall Street.” The subject matter, in all its glorification and glamour, is nice and exciting, but the quality of the content is lacking.

As opposed to taking the bull-headed approach, which ended up pulling down Ross’ “God Forgives, I Don’t,” Ross plays the gangster hanging out on his fresh leather couch in his newly purchased mansion, furthering his mystique with each and every puff of his cigar.

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CCSU Raises Tuition Two Percent for Upcoming School Year

By: Jacqueline Stoughton

The Connecticut Board of Regents announced earlier this month that the four CSU schools, including CCSU, will be raising their tuition 2 percent for the 2014-2015 school year.

“I personally think that while the tuition increase is going to hurt a lot of students, it’s tough right now for students to be able to go to school full-time,” said Bobby Berriault, SGA Student Senator.  “I don’t want to say it’s only 2 percent making it like it’s nothing, but I do think it’s a blessing in disguise.”

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Smoking Debate Lights Up Campus

By Ruth Bruno

Smokers at CCSU may soon have to part ways with their cigarettes, at least on campus.

The move is in response to a letter from Senator Chris Murphy urging universities and colleges in the state to ban smoking on their properties, according to Richard Bachoo, Chief Administrative Officer.

A resolution in support of making Central Connecticut State University a smoke-free campus was passed by the CCSU Faculty Senate on March 10.

The senate released a document saying they support such a resolution because secondhand smoke has been proven to be a health risk to non-smokers.

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Students Weigh Cell Phone Options

By Arianna Cecchini

As students make the transition to adulthood into college, parents are quick to take their college students off of their phone bills.

The issue facing students is that phone bills are not cheap. There are many carriers out there that advertise cheap plans, and some are even offering no-contract plans, but one needs to know whether they are being ripped off or not.

Currently, in the United States, phone carriers include AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, Virgin Mobile, T-Mobile, Straight Talk, Republican Wireless and a few other brands that are not as well known.  AT&T seems to offer both no-contract plans and yearly contract plans, as well as Verizon, Virgin Mobile, T-Mobile and Sprint. Straight Talk and Republic Wireless seem to only offer no-contract phone plans. It is evident that no-contract phone plans are a lot cheaper than yearly annual contracts, but the cost of the phones is much higher on these plans.

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Titanfall: A Mechanical Beauty (And Beast) of A Video Game

By Kevin Jachimowicz

“Prepare for Titanfall” may be the most exciting and addicting piece of speech ever placed in a video game.

Titanfall is an original, unique first-person shooting game. What makes it most unique is the fact that the game is solely an online multiplayer experience. The game only contains two campaigns to play through: the main lacking piece of Titanfall. The campaign feels somewhat forced in that it remains multiplayer only. While you are playing through the story, you are put into the mix of it with about a dozen other players, causing too many breaks in the story and making it hard to follow. Any notion of interactive storytelling has been ejected into space in favor of a strictly online affair. This allowed the team of producers to focus on making the most refined multiplayer experience possible, but also caused Titanfall to be painfully slim in campaign structure.

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When Breaking News Becomes Broken

If anyone hasn’t heard there was a plane that disappeared in East Asia; that was sarcasm obviously. But unless you’ve been living under a rock or don’t watch the news, but you should because it’s good to be informed when certain events happen, there was a plane traveling from Malaysia to its intended destination of Beijing, China.

 

It was reported on March 8, 2014 that the plane, a Boeing 777-200ER, disappeared and as of March 24 the plane still has yet to be found, but according to the Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak it is believed that the plane is somewhere in the South Indian Ocean.

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Poetry Out Loud Reads Well for Students

Central hosted the ninth annual Poetry Out Loud State Finals on March 12th. Class champions from 29 Connecticut high schools competed in the recitation competition.

Poetry Out Loud, it is a nationwide contest during which students select three works from acclaimed poets and recite them to the best of their ability in front of a panel of judges. Participants are scored based on accuracy, posture, voice and articulation, proof of understanding and complexity of the work.

The judges consisted of well-known authors, poets, musicians, and playwrights. Anyone who attended the event would have heard poems from the likes of Emily Dickenson, Sylvia Plath, Gary Soto, and Shakespeare.

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GWAR Frontman Found Dead at 50

David Brockie, lead singer of the metal band GWAR, better known by his stage name Oderus Urungus, was found dead in his Virginia home Sunday evening.

Richmond, Va. officers received calls of a report of a deceased individual.  When officers arrived, they found David M. Brockie, 50, deceased in the home. Foul play is not suspected what so ever at this time. More details are to be released as the investigation continues. No official cause of death has been released yet. TMZ reports that Brockie was found sitting upright in a chair, that no drugs were found — according to their source. Another unnamed law enforcement source reported saying that suicide is not suspected.

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Because of Him, I Am Me

By Paige Brown

 

Just last week was the one-year anniversary of my father’s passing. This past year has not been the easiest, but what I have accomplished since then and what I am planning for my future is something he would be incredibly proud of.

 

Not only did I finish the semester of school last spring when he passed, but I kept moving along and now, I am graduating in May. I have missed him more than I can say, but getting this far and making plans for my future is for him.

 

I grew up a daddy’s girl. Even though I have a collection of over 300 Barbie dolls, I was an athlete, sports fan and rock and roll lover just like him. I can remember being 10 years old, playing the air guitar while my dad would be rocking the air drums to AC/DC and The Rolling Stones while driving to my first baseball game.

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Lacrosse Loses to Vermont, Drops Third Straight

by Sean Begin

After two tough games on the road against Stony Brook and Brown, the Central Connecticut lacrosse team returned to Arute Field on Saturday, looking for a win against a solid Vermont team.

The Catamounts (8-2), however, proved too strong on offense, handing the Blue Devils (2-5) a 22-7 defeat.

“Vermont is a good team. They’re athletic and aggressive,” said Coach Laura Campbell after the loss. “I think for us we knew they were a fast break team. So we had a game plan against it. It came down to executing some of the little things. And we just didn’t take care of that.”

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Florida Road Trip Proves Valuable for Baseball Team

by Sean Begin

When a spring sport’s season kicks off in the last few weeks of winter, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that games could still be cancelled. Thanks to several inches of snow still on the field, Central Connecticut baseball was forced to postpone or cancel multiple games at the beginning of the season.

The extra time, though, wasn’t a concern for head coach Charlie Hickey, who looked to the silver lining of missing some game time.

“There’s no reason to anguish,” said Hickey. “What were trying to do is look at it and spin it in a positive direction. We had a couple kids who were banged up, so that helped [to get them healthy].”

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Baseball and the Gold Coast

by Sean Begin

You may not have noticed, but the 2014 Major League Baseball season has started.

The first official pitch was thrown at about 7 p.m. AEDT. In case your not time zone literate (Thanks Google!), that’s Australia Eastern Daylight Time.

Yes, that’s right. Australia. The Gold Coast. Down Under. The Outback. Oz.

Back here on the East Coast that was about 4 a.m., which meant the majority of fans missed the beginning of the season in favor of sleep. (Thanks DVR!)

Time differences aside, baseball down under is far from a bad idea. And it’s another step in baseball’s attempt to expand its international market beyond Latin America and Japan, the latter of which features the strongest professional baseball league behind the MLB.

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Inexpensive Travel How to: Destination: St. Augustine

By: Arianna Cecchini

Open ocean, white sandy beaches, hot simmering sun: Is that not the ideal vacation to escape the text books and homework for a few days? Well, St. Augustine, Fla. is just the place to sit on a beach chair and comfortably lounge about — all day.

St. Augustine is not a place that comes to mind for most college students when brainstorming to get away, either because they have never heard of it or because they do not know much about it. It is only a two hour plane ride into the Jacksonville airport, which is an hour north of St. Augustine. And flights generally run about $190 for the entire roundtrip. Not too shabby for a vacation getaway, especially if you are going just for the beach — the only expenses would be food, a place to stay and the flight, which can all be arranged for under $400.

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Why Won’t Winter Quit?

By Acadia Otlowski and Jacqueline Stoughton

The official start of spring was March 20,  but excluding a few warm days, the weather has felt unseasonably cold to many in the state.

While the winter of 2013-14  is officially over, temperatures remained cold. But CCSU meteorology professor Richard Roy said that while the temperatures are below average, this winter is just colder than some others. But it did not break any records, he asserted.

“Most winter season’s vary,” said Roy, who said that there are cycles every few years of cold winters and warm winters. He has said that this is nowhere near the coldest winter on record. He estimates that it may come in near the third or fourth coldest winter on record.

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Spring Break: Helpful or a Distraction?

By Acadia Otlowski

After half of a semester of unstable weather, exams and insufficient sleep, spring break comes right in the nick of time for some.

While most students and faculty believe it is a time for relaxation, others see it as a disruption to the learning atmosphere.

“It is definitely a time in which I enjoy, since it gives me a break from our studies. It may all depend on a person and their schedule,” said Tony Miranda, a student on campus.

Students and faculty alike use spring break for educational acitivites that may or may not be directly linked to the university.

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Respect the Classics: “12 Angry Men”

By: Joe Suszczynski

Courtroom dramas are an intriguing genre of film. One can feel the intensity of the courtroom as two lawyers do their best to make sure their respective clients get what they are fighting for. However, the jury themselves are another aspect of the courtroom drama, with certain movies being based on their perspective. Filmed in 1957, “12 Angry Men” is a movie based on the jury perspective.

The story takes place at a New York City courthouse where 12 jurors are sent to a room to decide whether or not the defendant is guilty for murdering his father; if found guilty, the defendant would be sentenced to death. Eleven of the 12 jurors voted that the defendant is guilty without even discussing the case — with only one juror, known as juror #8 (Henry Fonda), dissenting. Being that there has to be unanimous consent to make a guilty verdict, the other jurors groan about the lone dissenter to which they then have to talk about the case in attempts to sway juror #8’s doubts to rather interesting results unfolded throughout the film.

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Jazz Ensemble Impresses With Deviations of Classic Numbers

By Kevin Jachimowicz

CCSU Jazz Ensemble put on an impressive show Tuesday before break. It was directed by Dr. Carl W. Knox and hosted by the Carol A. Ammon School of Arts & Sciences Department of Music. Dr. Knox started the night on a comedic note, as one musician arrived at Torp Theater of Davidson Hall minutes late.

“Did you tune on your way over?” Knox jokingly asked the late performer. The show quickly took a turn for the more serious musical skills that were to be showcased throughout the performance. The first number the band played was “Burnin’ Blues for Bird,” originally by Don Menza. Dr. Knox gave an interesting brief background on Menza, offering insight into how Menza’s son played in Megadeath. Menza even claimed to have once said his son “made more than he did in his whole career, in one night.” The song featured a smooth female trumpet solo early on, slow in its overall nature, maintaining a relaxed vibe. An eventual crescendo boosted the song into a boasting piece loaded with ebbs and flows through overpowering horn melodies that sharply transitioned back into smoother jazz.

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SGA Elections

By Acadia Otlowski and Jaqueline Stoughton

The Student Government Association elected its new executive board to office. The newly elected president garnered 230 of the 487 total votes, or 47.222 percent.

Simms Sonet won the presidential position over Alexander Lee and David DeHaas. Lee came in second, just 29 votes behind Sonet. DeHaas managed just 5.13 percent of the votes with 31 votes. There were 25 “no votes.” This means that students abstained from voting for a candidate. This procedure allows students to vote for only the students they want to.

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Track and Field Christens New Complex with Win

by Sean Begin

Despite the final vestiges of winter clinging to New England, Mother Nature cooperated with the Central Connecticut men’s and women’s track and field team while they hosted the first outdoor meet on campus since the early 1970s.

With temperatures in the 50s for most of the day, the Central team had only some blustery wind to deal with leading to a men’s overall victory and a second-place finish for the women.

“We’ve had away meets for years now, so it’s nice to have something at home,” said Coach Eric Blake of hosting Central’s first outdoor meet in nearly forty years. “The team was excited about it. A lot of their friends and family came to watch. The weather worked out. They really feel like a part of something right now.”

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Interning: A Costly Experience

For years, students looking to get a summer credit-bearing internship have been forced to pay the high cost of interim session credits like any ordinary class. This may be changing; since prominent schools such as New York University and Columbia are changing their student internship rules that better comply with national labor laws.

According to the New York Times, NYU announced that they will now explicitly instruct employers that post internships on their job site to make sure that they follow the Labor Department’s guidelines and will delete posts that do not comply.

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Menthol Cigarettes Out, Antifreeze E-Cigs In?

By Brittany Hill

Cigarettes started off as all-natural – some tobacco and plant wrappers. Once the demand increased, so did the business and the regulations. With the growth in business comes short cuts and getting to the bottom figure; nothing else matters. The CEOs and business leaders had an epiphany. What better to regulate than a guaranteed-moneymaker that is highly addictive?

Some states are already taking the initiative to regulate e-cigarettes, and rightly so. Last month, Los Angeles City Council unanimously passed a law giving e-cigarettes the same restrictions applied to regular cigarettes. It will no longer be permitted to use in public arenas, like bars or parks, where regular cigarettes are already banned.

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Alum Biographer William Mann Comes Back to Campus

Writing Hollywood, a talk hosted by author and CCSU Alum William Mann, took place on March 4 in the Elihu Burritt library.

Mann, a 1984 CCSU history graduate, spoke of his discoveries through writing biographies of famed Hollywood stars such as Elizabeth Taylor, Barbra Streisand and Katherine Hepburn. Mann penned “Hello Gorgeous: Becoming Barbra Streisand”. With his reasearch and writing, Mann gained insight about the creation of celebrities.

Barbra Streisand is a singer and actress whose career began in the 1960s with simply determination and talent, pushing her way into fame.

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“Brooklyn Salon” Showcases Select Artwork of Recent Brooklyn Exhibits

Kevin Jachimowicz

“Brooklyn Salon”, an exhibit of artwork, is on display at CCSU starting March 6, running until April 6, and features the artwork of a host of famed American artists.

Every semester, Central Connecticut State University Art Galleries hold at the least, three major shows. This exhibit displays artwork selected from recent exhibitions that have been shown in Brooklyn, New York. The show contains artwork from a host of skilled and renowned American artists: Michael Ballou, James Esber, Tony Fitzpatrick, and Jim Torok.

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Allen Iverson Immortalized in Philadelphia

by Navindra Persaud

“Pound for pound, probably the greatest player who ever played.”

That is how Miami Heat forward LeBron James has gone on record to describe Allen Iverson. When players like James, who is constantly being compared to Michael Jordan (probably the greatest to ever play the sport of basketball), describe Iverson in that light, clearly Iverson has left an imprint on the game and those who play it.

Iverson had his number three retired last Saturday during halftime of the Philadelphia 76ers 122-103 loss to the Washington Wizards at Wells Fargo Center. This honor speaks volumes of Iverson’s talents and time spent with the 76ers because even though he does not have any NBA championship rings, he left a remarkable impact on the entire city and the 76ers organization.

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Lacrosse Notches First Win of Campbell Era

by Sean Begin

The temperature was far colder the second time the Central Connecticut women’s lacrosse team took to Arute Field this season. But the team and head coach Laura Campbell were feeling pretty warm after the Blue Devils notched their first win of the season and the first of Campbell’s Central career.

“It feels really good; really great,” said Campbell in the warmth of the Arute Field press box after the team finished off the Iona College Gaels by a 15-10 score, adding that it was nice to get the first win out of the way and  to move forward with the season.

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Sheridan Sinks Competition: Cardboard Boat Race Earns Dean’s Cup Points

By: Ruth Bruno

Students of CCSU and staff members of IRC (Inter Residence Council) gathered in the front lobby of Kaiser Hall last Tuesday to kick off the cardboard boat race, a Dean’s cup event.

This event, one of many, provided students with an opportunity to earn points for their residence hall. The hall with the most points at the end of two consecutive semesters is awarded the Dean’s cup.  This unique activity was set up so residents could participate in an “interesting, active event that’s different than most dean events done in the past,” said Rebecca Laroche, a Dean’s cup advisor.

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Lockdown Suspect Kyem Pleads Not Guilty

By Acadia Otlowski

The former CCSU student arrested in connection with the Nov. 4 lockdown plead not guilty to two misdemeanor charges in New Britain Judicial Court Thursday.

“It’s just a procedural event that occurs in a  case,” said Robert Britt, the former student’s lawyer.

Britt declined to give further comment on the case in order to “preserve the judicial process.”

David Kyem, 21, was arrested twice in connection to last semester’s lockdown. The first was when Kyem returned from a Halloween party, at the University of Connecticut, still in his costume.

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SGA Bullet Points

By Joe Suszczynski

  • Dr. Laura Tordenti, Vice President for Student Affairs, discussed in her report Senator Chris Murphy’s initiative to curb efforts of smoking on college campuses when he wrote a letter to Central Connecticut State University President, Jack Miller.
  •  During committee reports Student Life Chairman, Senator Simms Sonet, announced that scholarships are due on March 13, 2014, which is a Thursday.
  •  A motion was made to approve a change in the Muslim Student Association line item, which ended up passing with 30 “yes” votes with two “abstain” votes.
  •  Senator Bobby Berriault motioned to transfer $1,544.60 SG9195 (reserves) to SG9120 (for use by Senate). Treasurer Mills amended the motion so it would read that the money would be taken from SG9010 to SG9195, which corrected the accounts that Senator Berriault intended to use, which ended up passing. The motion ended up failing with 13 “no” votes, 12 “yes” votes and six “abstain” votes.
  •  Senator Teige Christiano motioned to add section 5-E which adds two more senators to SGA that are part-time students. Christiano said that there should be “more representation of part time students on campus” and that it will also help out committees. After debating both sides of the motion, it ended being referred to the Ad-hoc committee, which will give its report by Monday March 24, 2014. The motion was made by Senator Alex Lee.

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KiD Cudi Pulls a Beyoncé, Unexpectedly Releases Album

Navindra Persuad

Kid Cudi pulled a Beyoncé when he released his fifth major album “Satellite Flight: The Journey to Mother Moon,” at midnight on iTunes last Tuesday to millions of unprepared fans. The album came with just a few tweets to his fans before the actual drop, then, at 12am fans were able to click to purchase.

What may have been a pleasant surprise for fans may also serve as a disappointment to all. Kid Cudi was founded on hip-hop music; it is what started his career. “Day n’ Night” put him on the map and people loved the loner stoner-rap vibe that was produced. “Satellite Flight,” is an album clearly created by a very experimental artist.

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CCSU Police Blotter Week of 2/21

UNREGISTERED: Elizabeth Brooks, 19, of 33 Iron St., Ledyard, was arrested on Feb. 26 for operating an unregistered motor vehicle. She is scheduled to appear in court on March 14.

SUSPENDED: Leroy Lopez, 28, of 119 Joy La., New Britain, was arrested on Feb. 24 for operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license/registration. Lopez was also charged with failure to change address. He is scheduled to appear in court on March 6.

TOO CLOSE: Bridget Santos, 44, of 913 East St., New Britain, was arrested on Feb. 24 for following too close with a motor vehicle. She is scheduled to appear in court on March 6.

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Nutty and Naughty: B.J. Novak’s “One More Thing, Stories and Other Stories”

By Brooke Karanovich

On February 4, 2013, writer and comedian BJ Novak (TV show, “The Office), released his first book, “One More Thing, Stories and Other Stories.” The book is a collection of short stories, encompassing a broad variety of subjects and characters. Each of them has something in common though – they’re hilarious. This is Novak’s first published work, and he wrote a comedic masterpiece. Straying from the beaten path of the traditional comedic memoir of an actor-turned-novelist, Novak instead utilizes a more David Sedaris approach to writing humor in his short stories.

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Pharrell Wiliams Releases First Solo Album in Years, After Successful 2013

By Kevin Jachimowicz

 

Following a near decade long hiatus from solo music, Pharrell Wiliams, the singer-songwriter, rapper, record producer, drummer and fashion designer, reclaimed himself practically immediately, being a deeply embedded piece in both major hits “Blurred Lines” (Robin Thicke), as well as “Get Lucky” (Daft Punk). He unfortunately could not replicate the same musical success with his most recent solo album, G I R L.

 

The album released to heavy criticism, not about the content of the album itself though, but rather the album’s cover artwork, which contained Pharrell standing with three women, all seemingly white women.  Pharrell responded to the criticism in a recent interview with YBF.com.  “They’re ill informed. The woman I’m standing closest to, she is black and she’s been a friend of mine for a long time. You know, I’m confused by it,” the Oscar-nominee admitted. “Then they’re going to ask me ‘do I not have an Indian woman on there or a Pakistani woman on there?’ But meanwhile, I do. She is African American and I feel sorry for her that people will look her dead in her face like ‘she ain’t black,’ but she is [black]. It’s a girl I use to date years ago,” Williams claimed.

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Respect the Classics: Spaceballs

Parody movies can be very rewarding to the viewer when they are done right. One example is Austin Powers (1997), a spoof of the James Bond series. One of the best parody movies came out in the 1980s and parodied the “Star Wars” franchise; it was called Spaceballs (1987).

The premise of the film is that President Skroob (Mel Brooks) wants to steal all the fresh air from the planet Druidia; to do so, he sends Dark Helmet (Rick Moranis) along with his subordinate Colonel Sandurz  (George Wyner) to kidnap Princess Vespa (Daphne Zuniga), who is getting married. However, the princess manages to escape, as she does not wish to get married, taking her robot, Dot Matrix (Joan Rivers), with her. Her father, King Roland (Dick Van Patten) contacts Lone Starr (Bill Pullman), a mercenary who is in debt, to accomplish the task of rescuing the princess. After negotiating a price, Lone Starr and his mawg, (half man, half dog) companion Barf (John Candy) go on the mission to rescue to the princess.

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Microsoft Opens Store Amid Apple Store Success in Westfarms

By Kevin Jachimowicz

Eager fans and shoppers at the Westfarms Mall in Farmington, Conn. gathered last Sunday night in anticipation of the grand opening of a brand new Microsoft Store. With it’s opening also came the arrival of Xbox Live Chief Larry Hyrb, better known as ‘Major Nelson’ to gamers worldwide.

Although the Westfarms mall has been a successful home of an Apple Store for quite a number of years now, Microsoft does not seem intimidated.  Their new store is located at the Westfarms Mall, in the upper level near Macy’s and Center Court. Grand openings are typically a spectacle, featuring large crowds, concerts with popular artists, giveaways and more. The latest event was no exception, with the Florida Georgia Line performing, as well as Hyrb announcing that “one lucky attendee would be going home with a new Xbox One console, and it might be you…”

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Diggin’ It: Construction for New Residence Hall Begins

By: Jacqueline Stoughton

CCSU officials gathered together last Wednesday for the groundbreaking ceremony on site of the new residence hall, the newest addition to the Central Connecticut State University campus, which will be built in the open greenery between the student center garage and Ella Grasso Boulevard.

“This has been a long time coming.  It’s been a long time since we’ve built a new residence hall and it’s taken a lot of planning and a lot of work to get us here,” said Miller.  “It fits into our plans for the university, it fits into our plans for recruitment of students.  We are not attempting to become a residential institution.  We will always have many commuters, many part time students, and many graduate students.  But it does fit into increasing the number of new students.”

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Central Drops Final Game of Season to Bryant

by Navindra Persaud

 

The Central Connecticut women’s basketball team wrapped up the 2013-14 season Monday night, falling to NEC Conference rival Bryant University.

 

The final career game for four Blue Devil seniors ended in a 72-65 defeat.

 

“[They were] never up and down emotionally,” said head coach Beryl Piper of her graduating class. “There are a lot of memories from different kids. They represented the program the way you want your student-athletes to do.”

 

“Hopefully, the young kids have learned about a lot of little things that make a difference with the team, because this group was close not just on the court,” Piper added of the influence of the seniors. “This team was like sisters to each other and you want to keep that kind of team cohesion together.”

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Travel Survival for Students: Budget a Disney Trip Without Going Broke

Inexpensive Travel How To. Destination: Disney World By: Arianna Cecchini

Growing up, every child dreams of going to Disney World; why wouldn’t you want to go? Mickey Mouse, Cinderella’s Castle, food, specialty shops, music, parades, fireworks, rides – it’s truly a magical experience. Being in college, clearly money is an issue to most students, and Disney World would seem out of most students’ budget, but Disney can be an affordable, fun trip for college students too. Disney has amenities that can eliminate costs and dramatically drop the price of a trip. Getting to Disney for under $500 dollars is easy to do for a few days.

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America’s Pastime No Longer

by Sean Begin

Spring may not officially arrive until March 20, when the equinox sends us into the long days of summer, but I’ve never really agreed with that astrological estimation.

For me, spring begins with the first pitch of an exhibition game from one of Major League Baseball’s first spring exhibition games of the preseason.

While we shiver away the last of winter’s cold in the Northeast, my eyes turn to Arizona and Florida, where the Grapefruit and Cactus Leagues begin smearing dirt on baseballs, oiling leather gloves or working on their swing or pitching motion.

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Hemp: Problematic or Problem Solver?

By Caity Ross

When most people hear the word “hemp”, an immediate association takes place – with its fun, care-free, stoner cousin, marijuana.  Hemp and marijuana have two different purposes. If marijuana is the stoner of the family, hemp is the doctor, the contractor, the conservationist.

Hemp and marijuana are derived from the same plant: Cannabis. They both serve different purposes. Hemp is a term for high-growing varieties of the Cannabis plant and its products, which include fiber, oil and seed.  Hemp is refined into products such as hemp seed foods, hemp oil, wax, resin, rope, cloth, pulp, paper and even fuel.  Cannabis sativa, on the other hand, contains the high content of tetrahydrocannabinol, which recreational users fancy.  “Through the process of artificial selection, evolution done by and caused by people for the benefit of people, the Cannabis plant has been designed to grow differently for different features,” explained Dr. Mione, a Plant Systematics & Plant Reproductive Biology scientist and professor of the CCSU Biology Department.

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Content or Cash?

The editors of the University of Massachusetts student newspaper, the Daily Collegian, made a difficult choice in one of their most recent issues.

Instead of a full front page of news content, complete with stories and pictures, the Collegian ran a full page advertisement in lieu of tradition.

When this topic was brought up amongst our editorial staff, there was a great deal of conflict over whether the Collegian’s Editor-in-Chief made the right decision.

We were divided. Was the ad an example of innovation or a blatant disregard for journalistic standard?

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Schoolboy Q Comes Clean on Dark Major Label Debut

Navindra Persuad

Top Dawg Entertainment’s artist Schoolboy Q debuted his first major label album Oxymoron, which is sure to leave fans as satisfied as they were with label mate and Black Hippy companion Kendrick Lamar’s debut album.

Hip-Hop fans have eagerly awaited the arrival of Schoolboy Q’s album in hopes that it would parallel his previously released mixtape Habits & Contradictions, all the while further solidifying his position as one of the hottest artist in the rap industry today. Much like Lamar, Q’s life was gang and drug oriented, so there is no surprise that the overall subject matter revolves around these issues. Q’s daughter also makes many small guest appearances, giving spoken word, serving as the intro for a few of the songs on the album.

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Teen Takes Unnecessary Action Against Parents

By Paige Brown

Rachel Canning, an otherwise typical high school teenager, is taking drastic and ridiculous measures against her parents.

This 18-year-old girl from New Jersey is suing her parents after an argument over breaking up with her boyfriend.

Parents Sean and Elizabeth Canning gave their daughter an ultimatum; break up with the badly influential boyfriend or get out.

It is understandable why she would get upset. Parents aren’t always going to love the boyfriend and kids aren’t always going to get their way.

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Ultimate Frisbee Offers Another Option

by Navindra Persaud

CCSU’s club sports program continuously gives students the chance to participate in a sport outside of the university’s athletic department. Sometimes this can be one outside the mainstream sports the casual fan is aware of: like Central’s ultimate Frisbee club team.

Ultimate Frisbee is a non-contact sport played by two teams of seven players. The field is approximately 70 yards long and 40 yards wide with two 20-yard end zones. A goal is scored when a player catches any legal pass in the end zone that the player is attacking.

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Tickets for Presidential Speech Cause Campus Chaos

By Acadia Otlowski and Jacqueline Stoughton

CCSU scrambled to prepare for a presidential visit this week, distributing tickets for the Wednesday event to faculty, staff and students just two days prior. The distribution went well according to administration, but the process was not without its hiccups.

President Barack Obama, Governor Dannel Malloy of Connecticut, Governor Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, Governor Peter Shumlin of Vermont and Governor Deval Patrick of Massachusetts will be holding a “Raise the Wage” speech on Wednesday.

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Course Abroad Fair Expands Student Opportunities

By: Kiley Krzyzek Students interested in studying abroad were able to gain information at a course abroad fair hosted by the Center for International Education on Thursday. CIE offers courses abroad during school breaks as well as full semesters abroad at partner universities in Asia, Europe, South America and The Middle East. Student representatives for different countries were stationed at tables armed with pamphlets and ready to answer questions about studying oversees. Frida Anderson, a Swedish sophomore represented Sweden at the event. “I’m Swedish, I’ve been here for two months,” explained Anderson. “More people should know about all the countries, it’s good to be here if people have questions,” said Anderson of the study abroad fair. Students had the chance to ask her questions. “Most are very interested in the culture of Sweden.” said Anderson. San Xu, a Junior, sat next to Frida and represented China which she said is “totally different from America.” Xu recommends studying in China and learning to speak Chinese to business savvy students. “If you use Chinese it’ll be useful for business in the future because China is powerful,” said Xu. She also recommends studying abroad as an opportunity to expand your horizons and “see new things.” Brandon Roy is a senior who spent his fall semester studying abroad in Fiji. “I highly recommend studying abroad in Fiji. My study abroad experience was amazing. It opened my eyes to new experiences, the people are great, everyone’s so friendly. It definitely pushed me out of my comfort zone which was beneficial for me. For students who have the opportunity to study abroad I would highly recommend it. It gives you an opportunity to create a new life for yourself in a totally new environment as well as form new friendships with others around the world, learn new customs, and grow as an individual,”  said Roy. The semester abroad worked out for Roy who explained, “The academics were good. The classroom setting is smaller than here, there were about twenty students per class, so you got more interaction with the professor.” Students also had the opportunity to learn about spending a semester studying in Germany. As part of a partnership with B-W Cooperative State University in Mosbach, Germany. The classes are available in English and if you choose to spend more than one semester there they can place you in an internship. CIE is one of the best programs in the nation, offering more than 45 courses abroad annually at both the undergraduate and graduate level.  These programs are short trips that are provided in conjunction with a semester long class. For semesters abroad, students are able to maintain their financial aid and all courses count as in-residence courses. The program has  over 20 partnerships with universities worldwide. For most semester long programs abroad it is recommended that you know the language and have a GPA of at least 2.75. Students interested in studying abroad should visit CIE in Barnard.
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Spacey Stacks “Cards” High for Season 2

By: Joe Suszczynski

 

Season one of “House of Cards” blew up on Netflix, making it an instant hit. The show was nominated for numerous Emmy and Golden Globe awards, only to end up winning said awards in their respective categories – for both the Emmys and Golden Globes. Now, Frank Underwood and company are back for seasons two of the series.

 

To avoid giving any major spoilers away, assume that season two picks up right after the last episode of season one ended. Frank (Spacey) is now faced with new challenges in front of him in order to achieve his goals. Sub plots involve his wife, Claire (Wright), along with some of his staff members (Michael Kelly & Derek Cecil), who have their own issues to deal with, in addition to a new character, just introduced into the series: Congresswoman Jacqueline Sharp (Molly Parker).

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Actors Shed Pounds for Oscar Worthy “Dallas Buyers Club”

Chris Pace

Anticipation for this year’s Oscars is starting to heat up with the ceremony just days away.  There are nine films up for best picture, but the underdog may make its way to the winner’s stage this year.  Jean-Marc Vallee’s film Dallas Buyers Club hasn’t received quite near the media attention it deserves, but should be throned as the best film of 2013.

In a different and unique role, McConaughey creates the perfect character in Ron Woodroof.  After acting for over twenty years, McConaughey received his first Oscar nomination and has already picked up a Golden Globe for his performance as Ron Woodroof in this film.  Jared Leto, who plays his associate, submersed himself into his role, refusing to act out of character for the duration of filming.

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Initiative Calls for Cleaner Campus

By Jaimie Leasure

The Student Life Committee is looking into adopting a program called “Campus for Compassion” to initiate small steps in a cleaner and “greener” campus.

Western Connecticut State University has already adopted this initiative. The Central’s committee has a number of ideas they plan on pursuing for spring and the upcoming fall semester.

The Fresh Start Project was proposed by student Andrew ‘Wellington’ Pegg.  “We really need to unify ourselves as a community and make it a stronger presence of caring especially for the environment and for the people around us,” said Pegg.

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Faculty Senate Votes On STEM School Proposal

By Acadia Otlowski

The Faculty Senate approved a proposal to open a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) School on campus, which would create a new school separating many of the sciences from the Carol A. Ammon School of Arts & Sciences.

“We have been very emphatic about creating a coherent vision and mission, name and identity for this new school,” said Provost Carl Lovitt. “This is a construct that exists at other schools.”

Responding to some negative comments regarding the proposal, Lovitt assured the senate the new school will be positive for the entire university.

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Eat Food to Starve Cancer

By Brittany Hill

Everybody has cancer? Actually, yes. But not in the harmful sense that you’re used to hearing about.

We all carry small, microscopic cancerous tumors (about the size of a ball point pen’s tip) throughout our bodies. These tumors remain harmless until blood vessels are available to “feed” it, let’s say. You see, without oxygen and nutrients from a blood supply, the tumor cannot grow. That’s where angiogenesis comes in.

Angiogenesis (an-geo-genesis) is the development of new blood vessels, on which tumors rely to grow larger. Our bodies must maintain a balance between having too few blood vessels and too many to stay healthy, any sort of extreme throws our bodies out of whack. Pretty simple.

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A Formula for Successful Chemists

By Ruth Bruno

Although deciding on a major can be a long process for some students, the choice was always clear for student Alicia Gizzi.

After learning to measure PH in eighth grade, Gizzi became interested in Chemistry and decided she wanted to continue in that field. Now a junior at CCSU, Gizzi will graduate next year and plans to go on to graduate school.

“You can do a lot of things with Chemistry; I don’t think people realize how much you can do,” says Gizzi.  From working in a sawmill lab to becoming a lab-tech in a hospital, or maybe even finding a biology-related job, like taxology, there are numerous options available to a chemist with just a bachelor’s degree.

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Support for Gay Athletes to Come Out

By Paige Brown

Recently, two major professional sports have featured gay athletes: Michael Sam, an NFL draft prospect, and Jason Collins, a point forward newly signed to the Brooklyn Nets.

The NFL and NBA both have a major following and many fans. For both sports to feature gay athletes at the same time is a step in the right direction.

This past Sunday was the first NBA game in history with an openly gay player on the court.

“The decision to sign Jason was a basketball decision,” said Nets GM Billy King in a statement to Sports Illustrated. “We needed to increase our depth inside, and with his experience and size, we felt he was the right choice for a 10-day contract.”

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Women’s Basketball Victorious in Must Win Game

by Sean Begin

Survival was the word of the day for Central Connecticut women’s basketball Saturday afternoon.

The team hosted their annual Play 4 Kay Game benefitting the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. Yow was the basketball coach for the North Carolina State University women’s basketball team for 34 years. She survived two separate bouts with breast cancer before succumbing to a third in 2009.

The Blue Devils basketball team was also playing for the survival of their season. After dropping seven straight Northeast Conference games, the Central Connecticut women’s basketball team desperately needed a win against Sacred Heart University to retain any hope of reaching the NEC tournament.

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Innovation and Technology in the 21st Century

By: Jacqueline Stoughton

As both a Board of Regents member and Chairman for the Board of Regents for higher education, Nick Donofio took the stage in Alumni Hall to discuss innovation and technology in the 21st century.

“We have a lot of work to do and a lot of things we want to change,” said Donofrio, who is along with being Chairman of the Board of Regents, is also a IBM Fellow Emeritus and IBM Executive VP, Innovative Technology.  “We want to change, it always has and always will be about change.”

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Esty Q & A

By Kiley Krzyzek

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty visited Founders Hall on Feb. 19 for a question-and-answer session as part of a speaker series hosted by the CCSU Democrats.

Esty spent some time talking about how she ended up in politics and her opinions on a few issues, but most importantly she wanted to address the concerns of the students in attendance.

“I’m really here as much as anything to hear from you. Because to my mind being a representative means just that, is that I can’t do my job as a representative of you unless I hear what your concerns are, what your interests are. Hear your questions, hear your comments, and that is only possible by me getting out as many places I can,” Esty said to the crowd of approximately fifty students.

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Fashion At Your Fingertips With Flink

By Kiley Krzyzek

We all love people watching just to see what everyone’s wearing, but whoever theres always that chance that someone could catch you staring. This is where Flink comes in handy; an iPhone and Android application that allows its users to view what a number of street style bloggers are wearing with just the swipe of a finger.

Flink compiles high quality photos from a ton of fashion bloggers who live everywhere from New York to Paris. So while walking across campus in between classes, waiting in line for food, at any time, users can casually tap their fingers and get the most recent updates around the fashion blogging world to check out who’s wearing what, and what trends are hot.

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New Police Chief Announced

By Acadia Otlowski

After a semester without a permanent Chief of Police, Central Connecticut State University has announced a successor to the open position after the retirement of former chief, Jason Powell.

The new Chief of Police will be Gregory Sneed, 54, who has worked in various areas of law enforcement including being the Deputy Chief of Police at Eastern Connecticut State University. Sneed has also been a police officer, supervisor, SWAT operator and crisis negotiator.

“I believe being the Chief of Police at a University magnifies the need to ‘protect and serve’ because the majority of the population that we have sworn to protect are young adults away from home for the 1st time, experimenting with their new found freedom.,” said Sneed in an email, who will be officially sworn in March 10. “Parents, siblings and extended family members are not necessarily a phone call away.  Therefore, our duty to protect and serve also needs to blend enforcing the law, understanding the need for students to experience life on their own while still empathizing with some of their parents’ fears that are born from their sons and daughters being away from home.”

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Thrifting: Style Has No Price Tag

By Aundrea Murray

 

Who knows how to turn a penny into a fortune more than frugal college students? The majority of us hustle funds in order to survive the frantic lifestyle. Food, books, board – not to mention a social life – can run pockets dry in a blink, so a clothing budget is required for most. Sweatpants, leggings, oversized sweatshirts and flannels are some of the most prominent types of clothing seen at school…Where can one go to find the clothes they want for the price they need? Thrift shops. What makes fashion interesting is how formless, limitless and ever-changing it is. Style has no price tag.

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NFL Draft Prospect Comes Out

by Sean Begin

On Monday, former Missouri defensive end and the SEC Defensive Player of the Year Michael Sam came out publicly as an openly gay athlete. Needless to say, the news created a firestorm of conversation on social media sites.

Sam is projected to be a mid-round draft pick in the NFL draft in May, which if drafted would make him the first openly gay athlete to play a major American sport.

The announcement was met heavily with praise and celebration; from NFL owners to the SEC commissioner to fellow athletes both in the NFL and other sports.

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Dimethylsiloxane – Your Favorite McDonald’s Item

By: Brittany Hill

Last week, food blogger and health activist Food Babe started an online petition to stop Subway from using a chemical found in their bread. The chemical, Azodicarbonamide, is also used to elasticize yoga mats, rubber soles and synthetic leather. The Food and Drug Administration has approved this chemical, though it still showed adverse affects from the factory workers in which the chemical was dealt. The amount approved by the FDA is significantly smaller than the amount used to make yoga mats, soles, etc.

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Clarity to the “Magnificent Delusions”

 

By Acadia Otlowski

A former Pakistan ambassador crammed a campus lecture into his busy schedule to give students perspective on the often-tense relationship between the United States and Pakistan last Wednesday.

Speaking to the students in an hour between two different lectures, Husain Haqqani, author and former Pakistan ambassador to the United States, gave the lecture to remind students of the importance of understanding what is going on in the rest of the world.

“They are occasionally our ally and they are occasionally playing footsy with Al Queda,” said Ned Lamont, a distinguished professor of political science and philosophy at CCSU, who introduced Haqqani. “It’s a complicated relationship based on some magnificent delusions.”

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Free Courses Offered Downtown

Central will offer three free courses to select non-profit organizations in New Britain throughout the months of February and March. It is the university’s way of giving back to the non-profit community while helping to better manage and advertise their organizations.

“This is a partnership between community engagement and continuing education,” said Hannah Hurwitz, Assistant Director of Community Engagement.  “There’s so many non profits in New Britain and CCSU has all these great resources and all these professors at the university that have all this great information so we thought, why don’t we have these one time free courses for the local non-profits.”

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Rick Ross Buys Alum’s Artwork

By Jacqueline Stoughton

With a combined force of creativity and strong marketing skills, Olivia Nguyen, recent CCSU graduate and aspiring artist, has showcased her work in New York galleries and has since attracted musicians Rick Ross and Swiss Beatz to purchase her works of art.

“It was unreal, it was my first time meeting someone that famous,” said Nguyen describing her experience of meeting Rick Ross.  Mayback music group first discovered Nguyen, who goes by the artist name “Fiya Bomb,” when they saw a small drawing of Ross on her Instagram.  They then contacted her, asking to draw a larger portrait of him

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Local Gym Gives Student Discounts

By Kiley Krzyzek

Students and faculty can enjoy new, exclusive discounts offered by LA Fitness of Farmington.

The advocate of such a discount is a recent Central graduate, Cody Backus, who works as a sales counselor at the gym.

“I started there in December, literally right after I graduated. I actually just got it approved, for a regular gym membership its $99 initiation $29.99 a month. Basically for Central students they can wave the initiation so it’s $0 down, $29.99 a month, no contract,” explained Backus who has studied Management and Marketing.

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Love Should Mean More than Just One Day

By: Joe Suszczynski

Valentine’s Day is almost here. I am sure some of you reading this are still in midst of getting something–a card, a box of candy, or flowers for your significant other. Me: I am just chilling out and figuring out what I plan on doing that night because it will be on a Friday.

I never really understood the concept of Valentine’s Day. Not because I am some bitter and cynical single person who is always single for a holiday. I do not see why there has to be a holiday specifically to express one’s love for someone else special in his or her life, especially considering the origins of this holiday

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Bastille Blesses With “Bad Blood”

Brooke Karanovich

British band Bastille’s debut album, “Bad Blood” (2013) is currently breaking into the American mainstream music scene with their newest hit song “Pompeii.” It is just one of a multitude of catchy upbeat songs on this album.

Formed in 2010, Bastille is a relatively new group. The band emerged as a result of lead singer Chris Smith’s attempts to break into the alternative rock scene. Bastille is a four-man group including vocalist/percussionist Smith, acoustic guitarist William Farquarson, percussionist Kyle J. Simmons and drummer Chris Wood.

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Club Hockey Serves the Students

by Navindra Persaud

Blue Devil pride at Central Connecticut State University is always well represented by its athletic department and the various teams that compete.

However, RECentral, the department which promotes recreational activities and fitness, has also provided students who want to compete at a collegiate level with their Club Sports program, which features a more diverse range of sports for students to choose from.

Rather than competing within the university like the intramural program, these club sports teams are able to compete on an intercollegiate level, to give the players a chance to showcase their ability in sports that don’t receive funding through the athletic department; sports such as CCSU’s ice hockey club team.

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Fill Your Stomach, Not Your Script

By Brittany Hill

They say the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. It’s also the way to curing disease.

Surely it’s easier to pop a pill every morning than to change your entire diet. But the fact is, food is your ultimate cure.

Our parents’ generation learned to take a pill when something ailed. However, years of adapting to this lifestyle and accruing both mental and physical health ailments are proving their practices as troublesome.

Although some over the counter and prescription pills have great intentions and ultimately help people in need, they are also the scapegoat for avoiding real, underlying issues. Not to mention, more than half of the prescription pills you are taking are to counteract or treat side effects from another pill. And the cycle continues viciously.

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Coke’s Message Lost in Translation

On Sunday, 111 million-plus people watched the Seattle Seahawks demolish the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl LXVIII. While there are no numbers to show how many watched solely for the commercials, it can be assumed a large section of the viewership were more interested in the ads than the action taking place on the field.

Unlike any other live television event, the Super Bowl is universally recognized as one of if not the premier programs to advertise on, with a 30 second ad running $3-4 million. The commercials have become as big as the game itself.

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Sochi Olympic Games A Mess

by Mike Griffen

Outside of the Iceberg Skating Palace in Sochi, Russia (one site of the XXII Winter Olympic Games) stands something that defies the concept of “winter” games: palm trees.

Say what you will about the Russians, it’s impossible to deny their proficiency in the art of deliberate contradiction. Sochi is a beach resort. Yes, a beach resort, situated on the northeastern coast of the Black Sea, one of the warmest regions of Russia. It has an average winter temperature in the neighborhood of 52 degrees Fahrenheit and its climate is classified as sub-tropical.

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‘Miss Representation’ Portrays the Truth

By Paige Brown

The screening of ‘Miss Representation’ in Torp Theater last Tuesday revealed staggering information to students, professors and panelists about how the media portrays woman and girls and how it affects our daily lives.

Susan Campbell, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and newly selected Robert C. Vance Endowed Chair in Journalism and Mass Communication at CCSU, moderated a panel discussion following the screening of  ‘Miss Representation’, a documentary that explores all the ways the media portrays women and how it underestimates the power that women can hold without being defined by sexuality and physical beauty.

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Design Flaw Sets Back Police Operations

By Caitlyn Ross

Central Connecticut State University’s new police department has completed the move into a new $5.7 million public safety complex last fall despite a major design flaw interrupting radio transmissions.

The station’s radio signals were originally obstructed by steel studs within the walls of the building, according to a review of state construction documents.

The new police station opened in July of 2013 and is equipped with a 400-plus on-campus camera monitoring dispatch center. To strengthen radio signals between the control center and on-campus officers, a new antenna was installed on the roof in October 2013.

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Fire Displaces Students

By Acadia Otlowski

An off-campus apartment fire displaced residents from two buildings last Thursday, many of which were CCSU students.

Campus View apartments were forced to evacuate between 40 and 50 people following a fire that started in one apartment in the complex.

“I never had a fire in all my years of doing this,” said Andrew Liburdi, a property manager for 15 years and a community manager for Campus View for the last three weeks. “It was terrifying.”

The cause of the fire is still unknown but it is estimated that there is upwards of $300 thousand in damage, according to Andrew Liburdi, community manager for Campus View.

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20 Under 20: GoldBurger

Kevin Jachimowicz

It’s not often you exit a burger place feeling like a different person, but GoldBurger, which is in the vicinity of CCSU, and can satisfy your hunger for around $10.  If you’ve never had eaten at GoldBurger in Newington before – not to be confused with GoldBerg’s in West Hartford – you have plans to mark down.

The first time you step inside GoldBurger, you are greeted with funky, colorful paintings on the walls (this includes plays on various famous paintings, of course their versions including burgers in place of other objects), along with multiple bulletin boards covered in drawings from the younger customers, recommendations for crazy new burger ideas, polaroid pictures of their competition winners posing, along with numerous testimonials to all their different types of incredible burgers’, loaded with pretty much any topping an American mind can come up with.

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Respect the Skin They’re In

By Paige Brown

Tattoos have come a long way in recent years. More people of all ages and gender are getting tattoos, no matter their profession or work setting. But something that I always wondered: why it was such an issue in the first place?

People get tattoos for many different reasons; a death in the family, a quote from a song that inspires them, or even just something they find interesting to look at as an amazing piece of art.

I have five tattoos. Each of them has a strong meaning to me, whether it represents someone special in my life, someone I have lost or an awesome memory. I don’t, nor do I think I ever will, regret any of the ink permanently on my skin.

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Freshman Seizes His Opportunity

by Navindra Persaud

When the Central Connecticut men’s basketball team’s star junior guard Kyle Vinales went down with a broken finger, it became imperative for someone else to step up. 

Enter freshman guard Matt Mobley. 

In the eight games since Vinales went down, Mobley has been averaging 10.9 points, 3.4 rebounds and 2.4 assists per game with over 10 points in seven of those eight games. He had two such games out of his previous 13. 

“More minutes helps,” says Mobley of his success. “I’m getting more minutes and I feel like the coaching staff trusts me so I’m more confident now.” 

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“Seeing the Obvious, Missing the Structure”

by Sean Begin

On Thursday, Central Connecticut State University, along with the Mosaic Center and the Center for Africana Studies, welcomed anti-racist lecturer Tim Wise onto campus to speak.

Wise addressed a packed Alumni Hall, with listeners filling every available seat, standing in the back and crowding the railing of Alumni Hall’s balcony to get a good view of Wise as he spoke.

With passion and force, Wise spoke on the problems of racism and white privilege in the United States and on how racism is more than the overt bigotry displayed by neo-Nazi or extreme right wing groups.

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Campus Enacts Security Upgrades

Blinds are just one improvement that can be seen at Central Connecticut State University following a security breach  at the school late in the Fall 2013 semester.

In addition to the blinds, the installation of which are nearly complete, there are a list of weak spots, in the university’s security systems that the administration, has been working towards mending. The administration has developed a list of 17 aspects of security that need to be addressed.

“We have new doors going into Barrows [Hall] this summer,” said Richard Bachoo, chief administrative officer.  There are other improvements which will improve the security of Barrows Residence Hall.

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Blumenthal Speaks on Middle Eastern Conflict

By Jacqueline Stoughton

Max Blumenthal, journalist and author of the book “Goliath: Life and Loathing in Greater Israel,” visited the Central Connecticut State University campus to give a brief lecture about the topics discussed in his new book, including the persecution that many Jewish citizens in Israel are implementing on non-Jewish residents.

“Something is really happening out there, I think the conversation is opening paradoxically.  This country has democratic space to the extent that it’s never existed, and narrows inside Israel society,” says Blumenthal.  “In Israel-Palestine this borderless space exists under a regime of ethnic separation.  This is what I came here to talk about.”

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Reflection of a Fallen Friend

By: Paige Brown

It has been about a week since I lost someone important in my life. She was not only my best friend, she was like a sister to me.

After almost 13 years of being in my life, my dog Pepper is no longer at the door, no longer yelping for joy when I come home. She is not sleeping in my bed at night or rotating in front of the pellet stove after dinner. She is gone.

Losing a pet is just as hard as losing a person that you love and care about. They are just as much of a family member as your mother or father, sister or brother.

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Where Comfort Meets Classic

By Aundrea Murray

 Who knows how to remain fashionable when you are rushing for a 9am class while rubbing day-old makeup from your eyes and wiping freshly spilled coffee off of the seats of your car? Making sure that you do not over-accessorize, or simply ensuring that your lips are not dry, might not be the first few things on your mind as a college student. My opinion: flaunt what you have. Show off that beer t-shirt you won at a bar, and dust the caked snow from your UGG boots. A “laid-back” approach to your wardrobe is one of the highlights of being in school. You can dress how you want, when you want, and still turn heads without killing your toes in heels.

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Capitalism Makes Us Fat

By: Brittany Hill

Losing weight is not about eating less food, it’s about eating the right food. Think of your body as a machine. If you put bad in, bad will come out. Likewise, if you put good in, good will come out. For some people in the U.S., and other cultures around the world, eating healthy comes naturally. But Americans are so busy figuring out their “next” step, that food is nothing more than sustenance until the next hunger pain or moment of boredom.

In comes processed foods.

As prevalent as processed foods are in our grocery stores, gas stations and vending machines, there is almost nothing good about them. Nearly all of the ingredients are treated with chemicals impossible to pronounce. Does this worry anyone else? Think about it. Almost everything we are putting into our bodies is full of preservatives. I dare you to read the food labels and seriously tell yourself that you will feel good after ingesting such harmful ingredients.

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Coffee Shop Brews New Choices

By Aundrea Murray

The grand opening of Sodexo’s newest coffee shop this week has the campus buzzing with curiosity and excitement. Students are wondering what is it that makes this new university installment different from the others. Within the past year, CCSU has managed to introduce a new meditation room, recreational center and academic building. General manager Dawn Tedesco confirms that a new coffee shop will be revealed in the Social Sciences building.

Sodexo plans to take a more natural approach to food and beverage availability at this new location. Tedesco says that Central will now have a coffee shop offering organic and more healthful alternatives to the popular bags of junk food and energy drinks. While such unhealthful items will most likely remain popular in the bookstore or cafeteria, students seem to be looking forward to the better options.

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CSU Community Shares Positive Experience With State School System

By Jacqueline Stoughton

The members of the Higher Education Committee, along with students, alumni, and faculty of the CSU community, came together last week to hold a meet and greet for the members of the Board of Regents to share their personal, academic, and social experiences at each of the four Connecticut state universities.

The Connecticut State University American Association of University Professors sponsored the panel discussion where three representatives from each of the four CSU schools shared what they love most about their school, how their experience at a CSU school has positively benefited and impacted their lives.

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NFL Executive Gives Back to Central Through Scholarship

By Sean Begin

Scott Pioli, former Central Connecticut student and current NFL executive, has long been involved with giving back to the alma mater that made him a first generation college student. Most recent is the scholarship he endowed the school with in his name in 2011.

“I absolutely love Central Connecticut ,” says Pioli by phone. “It was five of the best growing years and most enjoyable years of my life. I’ve always given back to the university and always will because I got so much from it and the people there.”

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Tuition Pays for Athletes to Play

By Brittany Hill 

Students at Central Connecticut State University may be supporting their sports department’s finances without even realizing it.

CCSU ranks as the 9th most subsidized athletics department on a list of 228 public NCAA Division 1 schools according to USA Today’s athletics department revenue database. Their athletics department is backed by 86% subsidized funding.

“I’m taking loans out as it is to pay for tuition and rent and stuff,” says one campus employee, a CCSU senior who wishes to remain anonymous. “And to know that they’re taking some of that money to put towards uniforms and pay for the coaches’ salaries is upsetting.”

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2014 Academy Awards Predictions

Chris Pace

As preparation for the night of the Oscars, before the awards ceremony, there are some films up for nomination that you need to watch.  Most of these films have been critically acclaimed, but some may not deserve the award. Listed below are the top five categories and the appropriate films that may have the best chance at winning their category of nomination.

Best Picture – “12 Years a Slave.”  It is tough to dispute that Steve McQueen’s masterpiece will win Best Picture of the Year.  The film is about a free, Black man from upstate New York who is kidnapped into slavery.  He is brought down south to work in the fields and tries to survive.  Chiwetel Ejiofor plays Solomon Northrop and is also nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role.  Lupita Nyong’o also has been nominated for Best Supporting Actress for her role in this film.

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Carmelo Lights Up the Garden

by Navindra Persaud

Sixty-two points and 13 rebounds. Those were the stats of New York Knicks small forward Carmelo Anthony Friday night after defeating the Charlotte Bobcats 125-96. The performance was an absolute privilege to watch and solidifies Anthony as one of the best scorers in the NBA.

It has been five years since Kobe Bryant broke the record for a single game scoring performance at Madison Square Garden with 61 points, besting former Knicks legend Bernard King’s 60 scored in 1984. Anthony shot 23-35 in his conquest, as he brought the MSG record back to the Knicks while besting his previous single game high of 50, done three separate times.

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New Coach, New Season, Same Results?

by Sean Begin

Last season, the Central Connecticut women’s lacrosse team reached the high point of program history, recording a record nine wins overall but, more importantly, tallying seven (also a record) NEC victories, good for second place in the league, and their first appearance in the NEC tournament.

Following the end of that highly successful 2013 season, head coach Kelly Nangle resigned in order to take the same position with Liberty University in Virginia. Enter Laura Campbell, hired in August to replace Nangle as the women’s lacrosse head coach.

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Schematic design proposal of new residence hall planned to open Fall 2015.

New, Groundbreaking Residence Hall for CCSU

Schematic design proposal of new residence hall planned to open Fall 2015.

Schematic design proposal of new residence hall planned to open Fall 2015.  Photo: The SLAM Collaborative

By Jacqueline Stoughton

Construction crews at CCSU will be breaking ground on a two-year project to build a new residence hall, adding to the nine existing ones; this will be the largest residency out of all four CSU schools.

The new structure will be located “down the hill,” in the open greenery between the Student Center parking garage and Ella Grasso Boulevard. The university intends to have the building ready for student move-in at the start of fall 2015 semester.

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Students Embrace Insanity

By Acadia Otlowski

Two weeks ago, the four hundred students who occupied CCSU’s gymnasium were attending a popular new workout class: Insanity.

Insanity started out as an “extreme home workout DVD,” but its creator, Sean Miguel Thompson, better known by his stage name, Sean T, expanded the system into classes that are now being practiced across the county.

Three days into the semester, January 15, ReCentral held a promotional class at 7 p.m. The first 300 people arriving siezed the opportunity for a free “Insanity @ ReCentral” t-shirt. ReCentral completely ran out of shirts, forcing them to order more for those who showed up after the 300 person cutoff.

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Take Notes or Tweet?

By Arianna Checchini

Technology usage in the classroom is controversial.

Professors of the CCSU campus are divided on their policies about student usage of laptops and cell phones during class time. Some allow it, others do not. Though students have their own opinions about the varying policies that professors enforce.

Thirty-five students on campus were surveyed at random and an overwhelming majority were in favor of using laptops and cell phones in the classroom. Twenty-six of the 35 surveyed said they should be able to use their electronics in class.

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Less Parking, More Problems

By Acadia Otlowski

Students who normally park in the Student Center garage and parking lot are in for continued parking woes due CCSU’s newest construction project that has closed over 100 parking spots.

According to a statement by Richard Bachoo, chief administrative officer, these lots will be blocked off for the next two years in order to create both a buffer zone for the construction sight and an area for parking construction vehicles.

“Due to the delivery of large construction materials, the University will be creating a construction entry point off of Ella Grasso Blvd. to reduce the commingling of the university’s general operation[s] and the construction project,” said Bachoo in the statement.

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Paul Walker Tribute

By Joe Suszczynski and Danny Contreras

Surely everyone has heard about the untimely death of actor Paul Walker. He was taken at the age of 40 and is survived by his 15-year-old daughter, Meadow. Once news of his death was reported, fans everywhere flooded social media expressing sentiments about his recent passing.

Last Saturday, December 30th, Paul Walker and business partner Roger Rodas perished in a tragic car accident following a charity event held to raise money for those affected by typhoon Haiyan. As reported by TMZ, a media and celebrity news website, they were both killed when Walker’s 2005 Porsche Carrera GT crashed into a tree and exploded into flames. Authorities have yet to officially identify the bodies of either man due to the extensive burns that charred both their faces and finger prints.

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Men’s Basketball Drops Home Opener To Rider

By Corey Pollnow

The Central Men’s basketball team (1-5) continues to struggle defensively as they dropped their home opener on Nov. 23 versus Rider 89-73.

Malcolm McMillan scored six points in the span of 25 minutes seconds to give Central a 10-3 lead five minutes into the game. Rider (2-4) would subsequently go on a 9-0 run. With nine minutes remaining in the first half, Khalil Alford made a three point shot, and the Broncs never looked back from that point on.

“I don’t have any answers as to why we’re not defending the ball,” said Central’s head coach, Howie Dickenman.

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Residence Halls Compete For Dean’s Cup, Bragging Rights

By Devin Leith-Yessian

Shouting battle-cries while whispering answers among themselves, students representing the nine residential dorms at Central Connecticut State University clustered together inside Semesters to participate in the Don’t Forget the Trivia Challenge.

The challenge, which occurred on Monday, was one of the last events in Dean’s Cup for this half of the academic year. Dean’s Cup is a competition where the dorms compete for points in a series of contests. According to Kasie Daigle, the secretary for the committee that plans and runs the events, the dorm which has the most points at the end of the academic year wins a trophy and “bragging rights.”

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Central’s Youngest Student

By Clement Eneh

 

It’s never too late to go back to school.

However, 10-year-old Maya Perdomo, fulltime 5th grader at Smith School in West Harford and part-time student at CCSU, aims to prove it’s never too early either.

Since the summer of 2013, Perdomo has been sitting in college level math courses and is currently enrolled in Math 119.

“I like math. School was kind of too easy for me. So my dad signed me up for pre-calculus,” she said.

According to CCSU Professor Myriam Santamaria, her daughter Maya was “bored” with the kind of math she was learning in school. “[Maya] always likes to be challenged,” she explained.

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From The Battlefield To The Classroom

By Skyler Magnoli

Central Connecticut State University ranks as the 9th Best College for Veterans in the North public regionals according to U.S. News and World Report. 

The report created a ranking for the Best Colleges for Veterans to provide the 950,000 military veterans on Veteran Affairs (VA) educational benefits with information on which universities have the best services for student veterans.

Currently there are 436 veterans enrolled at Central, with more inquires coming in from service members around the world.

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CCSUccess Proves True In Alumni Network

By Aundrea Murray

Central Connecticut has turned out a handful of individuals that have created influential names for themselves while applying the things learned during their time at the university.

Scattered around campus are multiple signs and banners showcasing the many graduates who are now a part of lifestyles involving some of their interests of study. Many professors and school faculty have been responsible for inviting some of these alumnus as guest speakers to students.

Students are given the opportunity to network with said speakers, creating a platform for potential references. Our school’s alumnus have shown students what can come after earning their degrees at Central. Regardless of what direction one may be heading, there is always someone else who has attempted the same path–and succeeded.

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Volleyball Falls In NEC Championship Match

by Sean Begin
Brooklyn, New York –
For the Central Connecticut volleyball team, a successful season ended with a difficult defeat at the hands of Long Island University-Brooklyn last Sunday in the Northeast Conference Championship game at Long Island.

The Blue Devils (21-9) fell in straight sets to the Blackbirds (23-7) by scores of 25-12, 25-19 and 25-14, who finished an unbeaten season in the NEC. It was Central’s third loss to LIU this season.

“We knew we were the underdog coming in here but we weren’t thinking that way,” said Coach Linda Sagnelli. “I told my athletes not to hang their heads because the work that they put in… nothing should take away everything that they’ve done this season.”
The loss ends what was otherwise a successful season for Central women’s volleyball. After opening the season losing five of the first seven games, the Blue Devils ran off a string of seven wins.
Following losses to LIU and Saint Francis Brooklyn, Central would go on another winning streak, this time of ten games, which was ended with the teams’ second loss of the season to Long Island.

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The Cost Of Savings

From 2006 until present, seven people have lost their lives during the Black Friday shopping rush. Seven lives were lost over cheap electronics. Seven lives wasted for petty reasons. This is according to a website, called blackfridaydeathcount.com. The very fact that there needs to be a website with this title signals that there is something wrong with this yearly tradition.

This year, just one person died, not from the rush of people, but in a car accident. A group of teenagers were in a car driving home from Black Friday shopping, the car packed with things they didn’t need, when the driver of the car fell asleep. Nineteen-year-old Patrick Henry Boyd was killed, and his four friends were injured.

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CCSU Student Health Plan Covered Under Obamacare

By Jacqueline Stoughton

Recently, the news has been all about the Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as Obamacare. The positive and negative effects that Obamacare will have on not only the insurance companies but on the individuals themselves seem to get buried in the many personal opinions regarding the health care reform.  Students at Central Connecticut State University are wondering, what type of student health care does the university offer them, and how does Obamacare affect it?

CCSU, along with all CSU schools, offer their students a health plan with Aetna insurance.  All students who are interested in going through the university for health care must either be a full time or part time student in order to enroll and are able to enroll their dependents as well.  As of right now, a student health plan with Aetna insurance has a maximum benefit of $500,000 per condition per policy year and a pharmacy maximum of $500,000 per policy year.

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Reflecting Before Break

By Danny Contreras

When I joined The Recorder in 2010, I had no idea of what to expect. I’d never written a journalistic article before, and cringed at the thought of interviewing people. Luckily, my first assignment was a short Upgrade piece reviewing a punk CD. Over the course of that year, I grew comfortable with journalism and writing, and started covering the CCSU soccer matches. I became entrenched between the two sections, and found it hard to switch back and forth between analysis and critique. As I finished the 2011 spring semester, however, I made a compromise, and combined the best aspects of my sports narrative and analysis, with the best aspects of critiquing a work of art. After a year and a half of working as a staff writer, I was then hired as the editor of Upgrade. Things had come full circle.

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Sophomore Set to Step Up

by Sean Begin
When the regular starting center for the women’s basketball team – senior Johnna Fisher – went down with an injury, it would become necessary for someone from the bench to step in and fill that role for the team.
Coach Beryl Piper turned to sophomore Amanda Harrington, who is now in her third season with the Blue Devils after redshirting her freshman year and coming off the bench for the team last season.
“Amanda definitely has to pick up the slack in the post spot,” said Piper before the start of the season. “She’s been doing a really good job so far in practice and in our scrimmage games. We’re excited about how she’s going to play.”
So far this season, Harrington has played well and seen action in all six of the Blue Devils’ games, getting the start in three of them while playing at least nineteen minutes in five of them.
In those five games, Harrington has averaged 24.7 minutes per game while putting up 7.6 points and 7.0 rebounds per game as well.
Despite the increased role she’s been getting, Harrington remains focused on the team and what she needs to do to improve the chances of a team win.
“It’s nice to play, everyone wants to play,” she said. “But even when I don’t play, I don’t get down on myself. Whoever’s out on the court, I try to encourage them, keep them going.”
Harrington notes that she needs to focus on rebounding, saying “That’s what I have to do. Offensive, defensive. Rebound, get [the ball] out and run. And that’s because of my foot speed. I have to get out so we can get transition points.”
So far this season, Harrington is third on the team in rebounding behind starting seniors Jessica Babe and Lauren Arbogast and has shown she can play effective minutes for Central.
Harrington comes from a basketball family. Her father played college ball and picked up the sport again after Harrington showed an interest in it and began playing with AAU club teams at the age of nine. Harrington’s younger sister, like herself, played basketball and volleyball in high school while her brother played high school hoops as well.
Listed as both a power forward and center, Harrington says she prefers to play more towards the center position, but finds herself having to play it differently. Rather than backing down an opponent in the post, Harrington has to rely on her speed.
“Because I’m not the biggest I don’t have the strength as much,” she said. “But I have the foot speed so I have to learn to get around more, to use my quickness against someone else’s size.”
Even though Harrington doesn’t have the size as other centers, she used the opportunity provided for her during her redshirt season to build up her strength.
“Redshirting helped me because I still got to practice; I still got to do extra workouts. So it helped me strengthen who I am. I got used to handling the workload of school and basketball,’ said Harrington.
The gradual adjustment to Division I basketball has helped Harrington settle into her increased role easily.
“Sometimes it’s still a little nerve wracking for me to get into the game because I get overexcited,” she said. “But I think because I redshirted, I got to sit and watch and still got to practice and get better, it’s actually helped me transition into it pretty easily.”
Harrington has had the help of the injured Fisher during practice, getting advice and pointers from the senior, who will give Harrington specific goals in practice to work towards to help improve her game.
“She’ll pull me aside at practice and say ‘Hey, you have to offensive rebound this next play, you have to do this the next play.’ It’s given me things to work for and work harder at. She’s been that voice in the back of my head,” said Harrington.
Harrington says that the help she’s gotten from Fisher has helped her see and play the game better. It’s a treatment she got when she came to New Britain for a visit before agreeing to play ball for Central.
“When I came for my official [visit] the girls were very family-oriented. They were really nice and open to me. It just felt right here,” she said.
Central not only offered Harrington a place to play college basketball, but also a place to earn a degree in her chosen field of graphic design. For Harrington, playing for Central fit both academically, as well as athletically, by helping to make a positive change to her game.
“I’ve definitely gotten more confident coming here. I’m not the biggest center but I’ve been able to learn what I’m good at, what I’m not good at and be able to adjust to how to play.”
Harrington and the Blue Devils next hit the court on Sunday on the road against Vermont.

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PS4 Review

By Jonathan Hurd

The next generation of console gaming has finally arrived. The PlayStation 4 and
Xbox One are available in stores. Being a loyal PlayStation fan, I had to pick
up Ps4. Out of the box, you get the system, a headset, a HDMI cord and a dualshock 4
controller. The headset works, though not too well. Good for a starter one. Should be
noted that you can also use almost any other headset that has a mouth piece; such as
the iPhone’s headphones. Another note to take into consideration is that the system
doesn’t support SD output anymore; you will need to purchase a HD TV to run it.

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Farewell Column: Time Well Spent

By Amanda Webster

In my first column this semester I wrote that that getting involved on campus is critical to a good college experience. I want to end on the same note. So here it is: my nausea-inducing, overly-emotional farewell column. Years from now, when I tell colleagues and friends about my time at college, aside from the blurred weekends with friends and last minute study sessions, I will tell about my time with this newspaper.

I know there are some students that want nothing more than to grab their diploma and high-tail it the hell out of here; believe me, I’ve had those days too. To put it lightly, these past four and a half years (still better than most) have been insane. I started as an indecisive freshman who procrastinated too much and spent many a night with a red solo cup in hand instead of in front of a textbook. Now, I am an indecisive senior who still procrastinates too much, about to embrace the struggle of finding a job. The only real difference is that I traded in the dank basement parties for slightly brighter bars, but somewhere amongst balancing long nights of layout and long nights off-campus with friends, I’d like to think I’ve matured.

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Deadspin Vs. The Baseball Writers

By Sean Begin 

The Baseball Writers Association of America released the candidates that will appear on the 2014 Hall of Fame ballot last Tuesday. 

Two weeks prior to the ballots release, Tim Marchman, deputy editor for the online sports website Deadspin, had posted a piece that claimed Deadspin was interested in negotiating with Hall of Fame voters willing to sell their vote. 

Well, someone offered, and Deadspin accepted. The announcement came minutes after the BBWAA released the official ballot. Predictably, the news was met with scorn by some HoF voters who felt it undermined the whole voting process. 

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Netflix it! Death Note

By Danny Contreras

What would you do if you had a magic notebook capable of killing anyone whose name is written within? What if that same notebook allowed you to predetermine their death, up to their last second? That’s the premise of the great anime series Death Note. Originally aired between 2006-2007 in Japan, it is based on the eponymous manga (comic book) by Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata that was published between 2003 and 2006.

The series follows Light Yagami, a high school senior with genius intelligence, who stumbles upon a death note–a fully black notebook inscribed “Death Note” on its cover with a set of rules inside.

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College Political Parties Face Off At Annual CCSU Debate

By Jacqueline Stoughton

The Central Connecticut State University college Republicans and Democrats participated in their annual debate, moderated by CCSU student Ashley Anderson; where they debated political topics including health care reform, gun control, and the role that government plays in the lives of American citizens.

“ObamaCare is an American solution to the health care problem,” said Ed Corey, Vice President of the CCSU College Democrats team.  “This isn’t a socialists plan, it’s a private market solutions.”

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Student Business Pops Up Downtown

By Skyler Magnoli

The former bank and historic Anvil Place Building in downtown New Britain came alive last Saturday. Central Connecticut State University students opened the Pop-Up Café and Making Value booths to demonstrate the potential for a youth-owned and operated business.

The Pop-Up Café and Making Value event was a collaborative effort of Central students and faculty working together with New Britain youth, seniors, local businesses and the Mutual Housing Association of Greater Hartford.

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Andrew Hurd Hears What CCSU Thinks About His Game

By Aundrea Murray

Known as the “walk-on” player, sophomore Andrew Hurd walked onto one of the most competitive basketball teams in the state and walked right into a community of supporters, admirers and die-hard fans.

Hurd’s name has made its way around campus one way or another. Students are wondering who he is, what he represents and what his purpose on an already strong team may be. Yet, whether he is being underestimated or questioned, he remains the topic of discussion of multiple conversations.

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Women’s Basketball Steals One On Last Second Free Throw

By Sean Begin
Controversy clung to the final seconds of Central Connecticut women’s basketball’s 53-52 home victory against the University of New Hampshire.
Central (2-2) had won their last four meetings against the Wildcats (2-2) coming into the game, but needed every second to pull out the win.
New Hampshire’s Corinne Coia went for a layup with three seconds left on the clock and the game tied at 52. Central’s Lauren Arbogast, a senior, came down with the rebound and drew a foul call from the referee with just one second remaining.
The call brought cries of outrage from the UNH bench, whole felt Coia had been hit hard and fouled in her attempt to go for the layup. Instead, Arbogast went to the line needing to hit just one of her free throws to give Central the game. She missed the first.
“I asked her if she wanted me to call another timeout,” said Coach Beryl Piper. “She said no. She was confident. She wanted to shoot them. I think in those instances you’re probably going to make one.”
Luckily, Arbogast hit the second free throw; enough to give Central the win over New Hampshire for the fifth straight meeting.
“Arbo hitting that free throw was huge. That just shows composure, mental toughness,” said senior Jessica Babe. “She always seems to come around at the right time. It show’s a little bit of toughness.”
New Hampshire went on a 16-3 run during the last eight minutes of play to set up the tie game scenario at the end. The three came from Arbogast, who had been cold all night from the floor, and stopped a 12-0 run by the Wildcats to give Central a 52-48 lead at the time.
“I honestly feel like we should have not been in that situation at all. It shouldn’t have been there,” said Babe of fending off the comeback. “When we’re up 10, that’s when you have to close it out. We just got too comfortable, start making defensive mistakes.”
Babe led the Blue Devils, posting 16 points and 11 rebounds for the double-double, to go along with four assists and a steal. Sophomore TeJahne Malone was the only other Blue Devil player to break double digit points, putting up 11 to go with five rebounds.
“For us, we’re really lucky tonight that TeJahne played as well as TeJahne played,” said Piper after the game. “She made some big buckets and got some great offensive rebounds to get us some second shots when we needed them.”
The Blue Devils went on a 12-2 run in the middle of the second before giving up the 12 unanswered points to New Hampshire. The first half was a back and forth tug of war match between the two teams with the game tied at 25 headed to the locker room.
Central went down by six to start the game but clawed back and exchanged leads all half with the Wildcats, twice tying the game before the break on baskets from Malone.

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McInerney Resigns As Head Football Coach, New Search Underway


By Sean Begin

Last Monday, Central Connecticut’s head football coach Jeff McInerney announced his resignation from the team.

“I want to announce today that I will be leaving CCSU at the end of December. I am sad to be leaving a place I have come to love and people I deeply admire,” McInerney said in a statement released through the CCSU athletics website. 

McInerney leaves after eight seasons coaching the Blue Devils. He posted a career 48-41 record during his time at Central, the second most wins in program history. He guided the Blue Devils to back-to-back Northeast Conference championships in 2009 and 2010 but has posted losing records each of the last three seasons. 

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Lowered Rims Lowers Standards

By Paige Brown

It’s that time of year again where college basketball is at its full stride. But the fact that men’s basketball always has, and seems that it always will, get more attention than women’s, sits in the back of my head.

All I can remember is the talk last year of lowering the rims for women’s basketball. Geno Auriemma, UConn Women’s Basketball head coach, told the Hartford Courant that this is the solution to making more people interested in watching the game.

Yes, lowering the hoop could make it easier for women to perform at the same level of excitement as men. But there is more to the sport than making it exciting.

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Tis’ The Season Of Giving

By Amanda Webster

The semester is drawing to a close which means Christmas is right around the corner. The excitement of the holiday season combined with the stress of finals can be overwhelming and if you’re like me, you’ve had to rush to buy loved ones presents last minute. Although this time of year can be exceedingly stressful for college students it is still important to find time to give back to the community and lend a hand to those who do not have the means to celebrate the way many of us are probably accustomed to. Below is a short list of nonprofit organizations that reach out and help less fortunate individuals that you can make a donation to.

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‘The Book Thief’ Gives New Perspective To Old Issue

By Rachael Bentley 

With an opening scene narrated by the voice of Death himself, “The Book Thief” sets a very strange and chilling tone that settles underneath the viewer’s skin and stays there throughout the entire movie.

Based on the international best-selling book by Markus Zusak, ‘The Book Thief’ attempts to tell the story of a young refugee girl living in Germany during World War II who is adopted by a German couple looking to earn a little extra money during the economic depression that settled over the country during the war.

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Open Forum On Campus Lockdown Answers Questions

By Acadia Otlowski

 

Thoughts and opinions were expressed about campus security during a forum, which resulted from a lockdown that occurred early in November.

Faculty and students were able to ask question and state opinions about the Nov. 4 lockdown. One faculty member wanted to know why the suspect was not located sooner. “I know that you guys were in a very difficult situation. I guess one question that I have is that the individual’s father is a faculty member here, who was in communication with his son throughout the time period,” said Mary Ann Mahoney, a professor at the university.”I just wonder if there couldn’t have been a way to be in touch with the father if you knew who it was.”

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TV Review: Almost Human

By Joe Suszczynski

In efforts to battle the ratings on Monday nights at 8 o’clock, Fox network decided to release an hour-long science fiction television series series called “Almost Human”. It stars New Zealand born actor Karl Urban, best known for his recent roles in the new “Star Trek” movies as Dr. Bones McCoy. The show was created by J.H. Wyman, known for his role as executive producer on the television series “Fringe.”

The story takes place in Los Angeles in the year 2048. It is revealed that crime rate skyrockets due to the rapid increase of technology  making impossible to control. In efforts to combat the rising crime levels, law enforcement resorts to using androids as police officers being mandatory paired up with the human police officers.

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Between the Sheets: Burn Calories In Bed

By Lauren Cannon

Everyone aspires for that perfect body: toned abs, strong lengthy legs, etc. Well, I’m here to tell you that this can all start in the bedroom, or wherever you like to get it on. Having sex has more benefits than most people realize. Having sex can be just as good as going for a run if you’re trying to lose some lbs., like most of us ladies; it can all start with your partner.

Having sex for one hour can burn up to 300 calories, and if one hour is too much for you to take then listen to this: just 30 minutes of sex twice a week can result in a loss of up to 4 pounds a year according to Cosmopolitan UK. UMM HELLO! That’s like a lot! Although the average amount of time a couple will have sex is only between three (yes three) and 13 minutes, there are still benefits even if you don’t feel like doing the deed for an hour straight. Whether you have sex for 3 minutes or for 300, you can still find ways to tone and exercise your body. With this in mind let’s take a look at the top nine sex positions according to Fitness Magazine that will not only spice up your sex life but tone your body too!

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Crack Is Wack, And So Is Toronto Mayor

Toronto mayor Rob Ford has become a household name after he recently admitted to smoking crack in “a drunken stupor.”

In the most recent chapter of the debacle that Rob Ford’s mayoral stint has become, the city council stripped him of his staff, power, and budget. The seemingly enraged Ford knocked over a councilwoman after the council stripped him of his duties, reducing him to a figurehead.

Ford has since defended his actions, saying that he knocked the councilwoman over while he was rushing to his brother’s defense. Ford’s brother was allegedly engaged in an altercation to which Ford felt the need to rush over.

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Netflix it! God Bless America

By Joe Suszczynski

Bobcat Goldthwaite is a famous comedian who has turned to writing and directing movies. In 2011 he wrote and directed a movie called God Bless America.

The movie stars Joel Murray who plays Frank Murdoch, a divorced middle-aged man whose ex-wife is getting remarried along with his daughter, a brat who does not wish to speak to him. He lives next to inconsiderate neighbors that enable his insomnia and constant migraines. After being fired from his job for unintentionally sexually harassing a co-worker and discovering he has an inoperable brain tumor, Frank decides to commit suicide. Just before he pulls the trigger he notices an obnoxious and mean-spirited girl on a TV show that parodies  MTV’s My Super Sweet 16.

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Kareem and the Black Mamba’s Return

Sean Begin
On Saturday, reports from Yahoo! Sport and ESPN, among others, were published indicating that Kobe Bryant returned to the Lakers’ practice court for the first time since rupturing his Achilles tendon almost seven months ago.
When I heard this, I became unreasonably excited.

It’s not like Kobe is coming back tomorrow. It’s not even like he’ll be back in a couple weeks. According to ESPN’s report, sources say Bryant still has “a ways to go” before even considering a return date.

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Recruiting For Central Athletics A Long And Involved Process

by Sean Begin
Four of Central Connecticut’s fall sports are starting to, or have already, wrapped up their season. Football has one game remaining: a home contest against Bryant University on Saturday. The volleyball team has finished the regular season and will compete in the NEC Championships this weekend. And both the men’s and women’s soccer teams’ season finished with semifinal losses in the NEC Tournament.
For the coaches of these teams, however, the end of the playing season means the beginning of an equally important time: recruiting season.
Unlike professional sports, which fill their teams through the draft, free agency or trades, college sports replenish the ranks by recruiting players from high school, junior colleges or even other universities to come play for their team. And while each team has it’s own recruiting nuances, the general rules are the same.
The recruiting process can be complex and is broken up into four “periods” by the NCAA. Each period – named contact, evaluation, quiet and dead – has its own specific set of rules that determine how and when a prospective student-athlete can be contacted by a coach or the coach’s representatives. Violation of these rules can result in penalties and punishment against the school.
For Central’s athletic programs, recruiting is technically a year round process. “I don’t think it ever ends,” said Linda Sagnelli, head coach of the volleyball team. Coaches are always in contact with players whether by phone or email, within the boundaries laid down by the NCAA.
But when the season ends, the time comes for coaches to begin traveling to watch the players they’ve been evaluating takes place.
“For us,” said Sagnelli, “our heavy recruiting time is January through nationals [in July] with March being a quiet period for us. The month of March we can’t go off-campus to recruit.”
March is what the NCAA terms a “quiet period” for the volleyball team, where Sagnelli and her assistant coach Greg Shell, are not allowed to make visits off-campus to recruits, but are allowed to meet with recruits on campus.
For Sagnelli and Shell, recruiting players for volleyball involves long-term vision. According to Sagnelli, the team has already signed a player 2014, and within the next couple of months will finish with the class of 2015 recruiting.
“When we go recruiting in January and February we’re looking at sophomores,” said Sagnelli. “They’ll come on an unofficial visit. We try to look for, on a timeline, a commitment their junior year.”
Women’s soccer coach Mick D’Arcy describes a similar scenario for his team.
“Our process starts earlier than most people,” said D’Arcy. “Women’s soccer identifies recruits their sophomore year in high school, and then starts the communication with them their junior year. And then usually by Christmas of their junior year, we’re getting commitments.”
The process of finding players to recruit also varies between sports. While all teams and coaches make trips to scout and recruit players, the path to those trips vary from team to team.
For the soccer teams, D’Arcy and men’s head coach Shaun Green, both of whom hail from the United Kingdom, a large network of contacts within the soccer world helps keep them informed of talent outside the United States.
“For the most part it’s our own network that we use,” said D’Arcy. “We have a network of connections around the world. When we’re looking for players we’ll call our connections and see if they have any recommendations for us.”
“We have our own network established of former alumni and high school coaches and club team coaches that we’ve known throughout the years. Word of mouth is really good for your program,” said Green.
Head football coach Jeff McInerney fields Central’s largest roster, with around 80 players, and echoes Green’s sentiment.
“Word of mouth is key, I don’t care who you are. Word of mouth and people having a good experience,” McInerney said of how people hear about Central athletics.
Word of mouth is how junior running back Rob Hollomon arrived at CCSU, after a relative of his, who played football at Central under McInerney, told Hollomon about the program.
“Chris Williams [Hollomon’s cousin] had a great experience here. He [Hollomon] was a 1-A transfer which you get,” said McInerney. “When you have a student-athlete that had a positive experience and they so ‘Oh, that’s cool,’ that’s how you get those [transfers].”
While McInerney and his assistants make recruiting trips to Florida and California, they generally try and produce a roster that features mostly kids from Connecticut, something McInerney attributes to meeting “the fiscal needs of the area.”
“Usually we stay in New England. Connecticut we go inside-out first. Fiscally, it’s more reasonable to meet the [team’s] needs in-state,” said McInerney, adding that “It’s way easier to recruit somebody whose support system is right here.”
The football team will get to see a large amount of local Connecticut players through the football camp they host every year, and through that camp McInerney will find prospective athletes, like current junior wide receiver Tyrell Holmes, to recruit.
Holmes, who went to high school at Bristol Eastern in Bristol, Connecticut, attended Central’s football camp all four of his high school years and was recruited by McInerney because of the relationship the two formed during that time.
Similarly, Green and D’Arcy field teams that are comprised mostly of Connecticut players, with a few regional kids and strong international contingents rounding out their squads. The international players are found through the coaches’ contacts overseas, while the local players are found by visiting regional high schools or by receiving interest from a player directly.
“It [used to be] hand written letters delivered daily to us and the old school VHS tapes. Now it’s different,” said Green of player’s contacting coaches. “You have one mass email you can send out to 300 Division I teams in the country and stick [the tape] on YouTube one time. It’s become much more efficient.”
Green and D’Arcy will take recruiting trips only to places where they have interest in the player, with Green citing budgetary and fiscal concerns limiting the trips they can take, similar to McInerney and football.
Volleyball faces a similar budgetary concern when planning recruiting trips. “The only thing that would limit recruiting is funds, depending on how much of your budget you can allocate towards being on the road,” said Sagnelli.
She is, however, almost required to travel in order to find players to recruit. According to Sagnelli, the Northeast is one of the weaker regions in the country in terms of competitive club and high school volleyball play. Therefore, recruiting trips to what Sagnelli calls “volleyball hot beds” are required.
These trips usually center around qualifying tournaments for nationals for USA Volleyball’s club circuit. They allow Sagnelli and Shell the chance to view hundreds and thousands of players on one trip. An app provided by USA Volleyball helps streamline the process and provide information on every player at any given tournament.
Despite the differences in the style of recruiting, one thing remains consistent between the three sports: the recruit. Or, more specifically, the type of recruit the team is looking for.
All the coaches value academics just as much as athletics, and seek student-athletes that can fit with Central beyond the field and into the classroom and the community.
“When you bring somebody in to a program they have to fit how you coach, how you teach,” said McInerney. “School comes first. It’s what I say all the time. They’ll all tell you that.”
“Are they a good person, someone’s who’s going to come in and be a good citizen on campus. And then, obviously, academically. Will they be a good fit for our profile here?” said D’Arcy.
Combined with NCAA rules and other concerns, such as budget, that limit recruiting, it becomes a difficult process to find someone who can fit both the athlete and the student role successfully.
“I liken it to crab hunting,” said Green. “You lift a rock up and there’s nothing, maybe a little tiny crab. And you lift another rock up, there’s nothing. Another rock and there’s nothing. Until eventually you lift one rock up and there’s a big crab under there, the prize. And that’s what it’s like recruiting.”
Despite the difficulty in recruiting, Green and the other coaches have all managed to learn the process well enough to field successful teams, more or less, year after year by finding the best players that fit Central athletically and academically.

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Late Game Push Gives Women’s Basketball Win Over Rhode Island

By Sean Begin

The Central Connecticut women’s basketball team needed the help of a late second half rally to beat Rhode Island 65-58 in their home opener last Wednesday night.
Rhode Island (0-2, 0-0 A-10), down by seven with 10:14 to play, mounted a furious comeback, and tied the game at 53 with just under three minutes to play on a layup from sophomore guard Tayra Melendez, who led all scorers with 20 points.
“I think these kids just believe in themselves. I didn’t see a lot of panic with them,” said Coach Beryl Piper of her team’s ability to withstand the Rams. “They kept their composure where in the past we started to panic, started yapping at each other a little bit. I didn’t see any of that today.”
Central (1-2, 0-0 NEC) responded to Rhode Island’s comeback with back-to-back three pointers from freshman guard Lauren Wolosik and senior guard Jessica Babe.
“Those are big baskets, really big baskets,” said Piper. “For Lauren to step up… and hit that, it loosened us up a little bit. And then we came down and Jess hit one back-to-back, game over. That was awesome.”
Babe led Central in the stat sheet, scoring a team-high 17 points to go along with three rebounds, four assists and four steals. Babe’s fellow senior, forward Lauren Arbogast, finished second in scoring with 14 points.
“My shot hasn’t been falling recently,” said Arbogast. “I knew once I made the first few that my confidence was up a little more. I just kept shooting and they kept going in.”
Central shot 50 percent from the field but lost to the Rams on the offensive glass, giving up 16 offensive rebounds. The Blue Devils, however, only gave up eight second chance points to Rhode Island.
In the first half, Central shot better than 54 percent but went into the locker room only up by three, in part because of those offensive rebounds, as well as turnovers, which led to 10 Rhode Island points.
Said Piper: “The turnovers hurt us. They had a bunch of offensive rebounds in the first half. We fouled them. They got to the free throw line a lot more than us. They were in the 1-and-1 with like eight minutes to go in the first half”
The Rams stepped to the free throw line 17 times in the first half, connecting on 13 of them which helped keep them within range of Central. The momentum switched following the break, however.
“The second half it was vice-versa. We switched around where we attacked them and that was a big difference in the game, too,” said Piper.
The Blue Devils cleaned up their game and sent Rhode Island to the line just once in the second half, while themselves connecting on 13 of 18 free throw shots.
The Blue Devils also had good minutes from the younger players, like Wolosik, on their bench. Sophomore center Amanda Harrington, who is filling in for injured junior center Johnna Fisher, led the team with seven rebounds and two blocks.
“Amanda played phenomenal. She did a lot of really good things for us,” said Piper. “With her and [Arbogast] in there together it makes us real big. It makes us very long.”
Central managed to pull off the win, despite not having one single player take complete control of the game from start to finish.
“That’s what our team is about this year,” said Piper. “A lot of different people scoring, a lot of different people rebounding the basketball. Hopefully, we can continue to do that.”
Central’s next game is tonight at7 p.m. in Detrick Gym against New Hampshire.

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Paramore

By Paige Brown

Paramore visited Mohegan Sun this past Sunday for their “Self-Titled Tour” and put on one of the best shows I’ve seen in a long time.

I have listened to Paramore and obsessed over Hayley Williams for many years now. It has always been a dream of mine to go see them perform live, and after this weekend, I know I will be buying tickets to their next concert.

Before they hit the stage, Hellogoodbye and Metric opened the show.  Even though their music was good, the crowd didn’t seem as into it as I expected. Most of the people sitting around me didn’t seem to know many songs by the first two bands, but for me, it was like I stepped into a time machine back to high school.

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Anthropology Department Digs Up Adventure

By Devin Leith-Yessian

While walking the fourth floor of the Social Sciences Hall, one might pass classes where students and professors are discussing anything from the evolution of humanity to the intertwining of modern cultures and ethnicity. All of this, and much more, is part of the Anthropology Department at Central Connecticut State University, which takes great pride in the work its professors and students do inside and outside the classroom.

“It’s a really dynamic department,” says Dr. Abigail Adams, who is the head of the department and one of its six full-time professors. It’s also a rapidly growing one too, with approximately double the number of students passing through than just three or four years ago, according to Adams.

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To Tweet, Or Not To Tweet?

By Aundrea Murray

A panel clarifying some of the chaos created after the use of the hashtag “#CCSULockdown” was held last week, giving faculty and students an opportunity to learn about the importance of miscommunication via social media.

Academic advisor, professor and NBC meteorology reporter Darren Sweeney hosted the panel inviting all faculty, students and staff to listen in on the reactions of many and the decisions that were made by the panelists during the campus lockdown on Nov 4.

Central’s Media Relations officer Janice Palmer sat beside student reporter and assistant news editor of The Recorder, Skyler Magnoli who was also accompanied by breaking news reporter for The Hartford Courant, Steve Busemeyer.

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Flu Shots Highly Recommended

By Acadia Otlowski

Students at Central Connecticut State University  have no excuse to refrain from getting a flu shot this season, according to CCSU Health Services.

“Even a young person who has the flu can be laid up for a week,” said Eileen Kenny, R.N. at CCSU Health Services. The flu season peaks between December and February, but can start as early as October and continue though May, according to Kenny.

Kenny recommends that students get flu shots in the fall, therefore eliminating the chance that students will get the flu early in the season. She also recommends that those who have preexisting conditions, such as asthma, diabetes and other chronic condition get the shot.

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Thanksgiving Board Games

By Danny Contreras

Top 10 Board and Card Games

Board and card games are essential to the Thanksgiving Holiday. They’re as important as the local high school football match, or the drunk political ramblings of your aunts and uncles.

But what makes the perfect board/card game? Is it easy but fun gameplay? Or the strategic but rewarding experience of playing the game? Regardless of why we are attracted to board/card games, they are key to family reunions. While most of these games can now be found as apps on tablets and phones, nothing beats taking the board out of its box and setting up the pieces.

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Five Books To Read Before You Grauate

By Chris Pace

“Five Books To Read Before You Graduate”

Reading has been a dying hobby since technology has advanced during the past 20 years.  A lot of people are busy watching TV and movies online, when they forget about one of the greatest forms of entertainment: books.  Here is a list of books to read before you graduate college.

 

  1. East of Eden- John Steinbeck’s lengthy novel about a father and his two sons living in Southern California is one of the great stories of the 20th century.  The Trask boys don’t get along very well with their religious, lying father, and spend much of the novel trying to find out if their mother is still alive.  This book isn’t something you’d find in a high school classroom, but it very well could be in a college English course.
  2. The Catcher In The Rye- This widely popular novel by JD Salinger is a favorite among high school English teachers.  Holden Caulfield, the main protagonist is a moody, rebellious teenager who hates phonies.  His aggressive personality hits hard with teenagers and may well be the reason why it is such a popular novel.
  3. Life Of Pi- Yann Martel’s novel about a boy stranded in a boat with a tiger is a philosophical journey.  Pi’s journey with the tiger, Richard Parker, is a test of his faith.  While on the journey, Pi and Richard Parker run into very odd occurrences like a floating island occupied only by meerkats and an onslaught of flying fish.  Pi learns to tame the tiger in order to survive and earns a life changing experience in his time lost at sea.
  4. On The Road- Jack Kerouac led a very rebellious life for someone in the 1950’s.  This book includes true events including traveling, drug use and infidelity during a time when most thought was perfect.  He travels throughout the United States and into Mexico.  He recalls a trip from California to New York going 100 mph and arriving 24 hours later, and a cigar filled with marijuana in Mexico.
  5. The Old Man and The Sea- Ernest Hemingway received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1955, mainly for this short but magnificent story.  An old man goes out into Cuban waters to catch a fish he so desperately needs.  Problems arise when sharks show up and his catch is put in jeopardy as the old man attempts to save it.

Books have been around for hundreds of years, and not until recently have they lost popularity.  If you think that computer geniuses advancing technology are the smartest people, you are far from right.  Writers have creative minds and inspire future generations of writers.  Without Dostoevsky, there would be no Hemingway, without Hemingway there would be no Hunter S. Thompson and without Hunter S. Thompson, there would be no David Foster Wallace.  Writers influence everything we believe in.

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Emergency Situation Training For Faculty In The Works

By Acadia Otlowski

Following the lockdown of Nov. 4, questions of how professors reacted towards the emergency have been raised throughout campus, specifically of whether or not professors are trained on how to handle a crisis situation.

According to faculty on campus, there has been no actual training sessions for professors and other members of the faculty for being an authority figure in an emergency. In the guidelines for dealing with an active shooter situation, it states, “There are three basic options; RUN, HIDE, or FIGHT.  Quickly determine the most reasonable way to protect your own life.”

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New Britain Seeks Reimbursement For Lockdown From Suspect’s Family

Amanda Webster

The family of the man responsible for Central’s lockdown earlier this month is being asked for compensation by the city of New Britain.

According to NBC, New Britain Police Chief Jim Wardell has contacted the family’s attorney about payment for police response the day of the lockdown. A total of 62 New Britain police officers responded to the campus threat on Nov. 4, costing the city more than $13,000. According to NBC, David Kyem’s family is being asked for $13,000.

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Thou Shalt Not Hand Check

By Corey Pollnow
Last season NCAA Men’s Basketball team’s averaged 67.5 points per game, the lowest since 1951-1952.
Free throw attempts also hit an all-time low last season. Team’s averaged 19.76 free throws per game, the lowest since 1976.
In the offseason, the NCAA Basketball Rules Committee discussed “opening up the game up” in response to those statistics. The committee agreed that hand checking – defenders putting their forearm or hand on the offensive player – is hurting the flow of the games, or in other words, the game has become too physical.
The committee has finagled with the block/charge rule so offensive players have more of an advantage when attacking the hoop. When an offensive player begins the upward motion of jumping to shoot or pass, the defender must be in legal guarding position, otherwise it’s a blocking foul.
However, last Tuesday when I watched Duke versus Kansas, I was disgusted with the flow of the game and powered off the television with three minutes remaining in the second half. I felt the game was being called too tightly. I went to bed frustrated.
What I had forgotten was that the season was young – not even one full week of games.
The players, coaches, and officials need time to adjust to the new style of officiating and once players get a feel for what is hand checking and what constitutes a charge or block under the new
The rule change is no different than when the NFL established new rules in regards to hitting the opponent with the helmet. NFL defenders had to learn to not lead with their head when tackling and instead lead with their shoulder pads. The majority of football players – minus a few morons like Brandon Meriweather and James Harrison – have adapted to the new helmet collision rules. College basketball players will do the same.
For the meantime, fans need to be patient with the current state of the game. College basketball will evolve and will be aesthetically pleasing for viewers to watch.

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Central Volleyball Splits Weekend Games

By Sean Begin
With a spot in the Northeast Conference tournament already secure, the only impact the weekend’s games meant for the volleyball team was seeding.
Wins over Long Island University-Brooklyn and Saint Francis-Brooklyn, coupled with an LIU loss to Bryant on Sunday, would secure the number one seed for Central in the NEC tournament.
Central (20-8, 11-3 NEC) finished the regular season by recording their 20th win of the season in a 3-0 sweep over Saint Francis-Brooklyn (7-25, 3-11 NEC) on Sunday.
“That was one of our goals, to get the win today. We wanted to have this as a 20 win season and they accomplished that goal which is awesome,” said Coach Linda Sagnelli.
But a 3-0 loss to Long Island (21-7, 14-0 NEC) on Saturday ended the Blue Devils’ chances at bringing the tournament home.
“I think we were in a fog,” said Sagnelli. “We got a little too amped up for that game and it drained them [the players] emotionally when the game actually came.”
The loss snapped Central’s 10-game winning streak and ended their perfect record at home.
Central’s offense struggled against the Blackbirds, recording just 27 kills as a team, led by sophomore Heather Trueman’s 11, hitting just .129 as a team. Sophomore Makenna Lommori assisted on all of Central’s kills
“We had a couple mistakes here and there but when you’re playing against a team that makes very few mistakes, you can’t make more than they make. And that’s what happened,” said Sagnelli.
The loss ensured that the NEC tournament will be held at LIU this weekend, with CCSU taking the second seed overall, and that Sunday’s game against Saint Francis-Brooklyn would have no postseason impact.
Central and SFBK spent the majority of the match on Sunday exchanging points, but the Blue Devils managed to find just enough offense to get the win.
“We had a hard time finding our rhythm early on and our passing was a little inconsistent,” said Sagnelli. “We found just enough rhythm to be able to do what we needed to do today.”
Trueman and freshman Cassidy Stankowski led Central’s offense against the Terriers. Trueman recorded 15 kills on 23 attacks with no errors, posting a huge .652 hitting percentage. Stankowski added 14 kills of her own.
Seven players recorded an assist in the match led by 33 from Lommori, who also posted five kills and three digs. Freshman Rachel Fish led the team with 11 digs.
Central now sets its sights on the NEC tournament this weekend. The Blue Devils will face Sacred Heart University in the semifinals on Saturday while LIU will play Robert Morris University in the other semifinal.
“We have to focus on whomever we’re playing,” said Sagnelli, adding “As coaches we prepare for both [the final and semifinal] but for the team we really prepare them more for the semifinal match because without winning that one there is no finals.”

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Dishin it! The Sloppy Waffle

By Aundrea Murray

Thanksgiving is next week and the last thing on anyone’s mind is getting in front of a stove, right? Right! So rather than overload you with some of the world’s most mouth-watering recipes, here are a few local spots with the best dishes you could possibly think of. No disrespect to your aunt’s infamous tuna casserole, of course.

It’s Thursday morning and the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade in New York is pretty much the only thing to watch on television. While your parents argue over whether or not to make a vegetarian dish or that one vegan coming over for dinner, you are probably wondering what time breakfast will be falling out of the sky. Do not even hold your breath; get in your car and head to The Sloppy Waffle in a Newington.

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Black Thursday?

By Amanda Webster

For the past several years, Black Friday shopping hours have steadily been creeping towards the Thanksgiving Day mark. This year, Thanksgiving has finally been eclipsed by the shadow of Black Friday. Most stores are open on Thanksgiving Day and have been advertising their “low” prices and “convenient” shopping hours for awhile now.

I can’t lie. For several years in a row I made it a tradition with my sisters and cousins to plan our shopping attack. We would get together after eating and pour over magazines to see what stores would be worth hitting and schedule our trip accordingly, because we all had retail jobs to get to in the not-so-early morning. For two years in a row, I would head out at midnight, get home for about 6 a.m. and then head to work a 12 hour shift. I know I am not alone in a schedule like this.

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Journalism Students Plea For Equality Among Other Programs

Aundrea Murray

The one and only reason I applied to CCSU was because of a rumor I had heard at my job in the mall: “Central has the best journalism department you’re gonna find in Connecticut”. After three semesters here, I’m not entirely sure that is true.

Before I contradict myself by criticizing the same department I remain loyal to, I have to admit that within this year alone, my success as an aspiring journalist has been extremely rewarding; I commend the support of this university for a lot of that. As a transfer student from Western (who refuse to offer Journalism as a major), I cannot stress enough how much Central has helped with adjusting to the changes in my curriculum. It felt like everyday that I was getting emails from Academic Articulations about advising workshops, upcoming events and even what courses were planning to study abroad–Journalism was going to China, so I was completely on board!

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Men’s Soccer Shocked In Semifinals

By Corey Pollnow
Heading into the NEC semifinals on Friday versus St. Francis Brooklyn, the Central Men’s soccer team knew they would be playing without one of their captains, Stephen Walmsley.
Then 15 minutes before kick-off, the NEC regular season champions were hit with another blow. Central’s second captain, senior Jose Gamboa, discovered he was not cleared by the trainer to play. Gamboa and Walmsley had suffered concussions in the regular season finale against Bryant.
St. Francis Brooklyn had been on the losing end in the previous two match-ups versus CCSU, and the Terriers had not won the NEC tournament since 1998. However, St. Francis Brooklyn shocked the Blue Devils 2-0, and went on to win the championship 3-2 in overtime versus Bryant Sunday afternoon.
“It’s a tough pill to swallow when you lose both of your captains,” said Coach Shaun Green.
Kevin Correa scored his second goal in the 73rd minute when Central’s outside defensive back, Neekoli Calderon, momentarily lost Correa on a give and go from Gabriel Bagot. The mental mistake allowed Correa to gain enough distance to receive the ball deep in the penalty box, dribble once and power the shot past Central’s goalkeeper, Joe Abele.
“The second goal killed us,” said senior, Manny Nobre.
In the 61st minute Correa bent a shot over Central’s wall and past Abele. It was Correa’s first goal of the game and came off a free kick from 19 yards away on the right portion of the pitch.
“I thought we left the goal a little bit too much open on the left hand side,” said Green.
Central’s best scoring opportunity came in the 54th minute when Ben Knight curled a ball over three Terriers defenders, but the ball skimmed across the top of the crossbar and out of bounds.
“I thought Central came out and played great to start the second half and put us under pressure,” said Tom Giovatto, the Terriers head coach. “But Kevin got us two big goals.”
Abele saved three of St. Francis Brooklyn’s five shots on goal. The junior finishes the season with 66 saves, a save percentage of .786 and a goals against average of 1.24.
The Blue Devils and Terriers both tallied 12 shots for the game.
“We lost two keys players, Jose and Walsmey, but the other guys have to step in and do their job,” said Eddy Bogle.
On Friday evening Conor Qualter was named to the NEC All-Conference First team and received Rookie of the Year at the NEC banquet.
Central also had five players selected to the NEC All-Conference Second Team – Zach Zurita, Bogle, Abele, Walmsley, and Gamboa.
Green was named NEC Coach of the Year and also earned his 250th victory this season.
“Were proud of the season we had,” said Green, who recorded his third NEC Regular Season Championship this season in his 29th year at Central as head coach. “We thought this would be a two year rebuilding process, losing seven starters from last year. We thought we would nearly get into the playoffs, but we really excelled in our expectations.”

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‘Love Actually” Director Wins Over Audiences Time And Time Again

By Rachael Bentley

Leaving the movie theater sniffling and searching for yet another tissue, I couldn’t hide the fact that writer and director Richard Curtis has thrown a wrench into my emotional clockwork with his latest film.

‘About Time’ shook me to my core. Curtis has mastered the art of mixing wit with raw emotion. If you thought you cried hard during ‘The Notebook’ or ‘Titanic’,  then be prepared for the unexpected sob-fest to come from this film.

The movie opens with 21-year-old Tim, played by Domhnall Gleeson, discovering that he can travel in time.  After being sat down and told by his father (Bill Nighy) that all of his male ancestors were able to travel back in time to any moment in their own life, Tim is far from convinced. His Dad explains that all he has to do is stand in a small, dark, empty space like a cupboard or closet, clench his fists together, think of a specific moment in time and voila, he will be sent back to that exact moment.

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SGA Bullet Points 11/13

Jaimie Leasure

  • After a long debate, the student government decided to put some Student Activity fees towards SGA scholarships.  All students pay $44 a semester towards Student Activity fees, Senator Matt Hubbard said “I would give someone part of my $44 if they needed help paying for college.”  With this vote, SGA only approved to use Student Activity fees for scholarships, they have not decided on an amount yet.
  • The Men’s Rugby team was allocated $1213.17 for accommodations, the team qualified for the regional tournament in New Hampshire.  “We should reward excellence, they are ranked nationwide,” said Senator Bobby Berriault.
  • Theatre Unlimited was looking to move $341 from their entertainment budget to travel.  “They found tickets at a cheaper rate and want to move the money to allow more people to go,” explained Senator Connor Fallanca.  The motion passed with a 32-1-2 vote.
  • Men’s Lacrosse was put on Probation by the student government.  “This is the view of the community that this is grounds for probation,” said Treasurer Kory Mills.  Senator Matt Hubbard stated “SALD was under the impression that there were two events, one past and one future.  Probation does not restrict the club; it’s to make sure they know we will not tolerate this again.”
  • SGA allocated the College Democrats $80 to go towards refreshments for their upcoming debate.  With a vote of 14-7-3 Senator Simms Sonet stated “throughout other debates we’ve been saying don’t look at the amount, yes $80 is a trivial amount but let’s not look at it.  We’re looking at the merit of what it stands for.”
  • The Chemistry Club was looking for $3748 for travel for their conference.  The motion passed with a 12-5-6 vote.
  • President Brian Choplick proposed a standing rule to the senate stating that “any use of the SGA logo or SGA name in advertisement must be approved by a member of the SGA Executive Board, or by majority vote of the Senate.”  The rule passed with a 16-1-3 vote.
  • Choplick also motioned for another standing rule stating that “any use of any committee name or logo in advertisement or communication must be approved by the Chair or Co-Chair of the committee, or by majority vote of that committee.”  This motion passed with a 19-0-3 vote.

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Specializing Universities Limits Accessibility

The strategic plan for ConnSCU, the system which includes Central, Eastern, Western and Southern Universities and 17 community colleges, outlines a plan for CCSU to become focused on the STEM (Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) initiate. It has each ConnSCU university specializing in different area. Western would become a visual and performing arts focused school, Eastern a liberal arts school and Southern a health and human services.

The areas that STEM focuses on has recently become of great interest when it became obvious other countries were outpacing the United States. Governor Malloy proposed an investment of $1.5 billion for the University of Connecticut’s STEM program and Central hopes to receive more funding with a emphasized STEM program of their own.

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Faculty Senate

Amanda Webster

The Faculty Senate spent most of its last meeting Monday debating aspects of ConnSCU’s strategic plan.

Suggestions to the plan was laid out in a recent statement from President John Miller to various University officials and aims to “promote distinct institutional and curricular identities for each of the four Connecticut State Universities.”

The senate had mixed feelings about CCSU’s desire to identify itself as a STEM school (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math). Most concerns were directly related to funding issues.

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Austin’s Fantasy Game

By Paige Brown

This past Sunday was a huge day for St. Louis Rams’ rookie receiver Tavon Austin, as well as everyone who has had him on their fantasy team.

49.40 points was what I received from Austin to win my fantasy game. He scored three touchdowns, which all went for 55 yards or longer, racking up 314 all-purpose yards in the game against the Indianapolis Colts.

Compared to Victor Cruz’s 3.70 points or Dez Bryant’s 4.40 points, Austin was the player to have to lead any team to a win.

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Real Stars Should Shine On Veterans Day

This past Monday marked Veterans Day, a day to remember and celebrate the men and women who have served in the different branches of the military. While families and friends got together to honor the lives lost in the name of our country, a “soldier” of sorts was trending on Twitter for his brave fight against a stomach bug.

According to the Washington Post, Justin Bieber walked off stage during a performance on Monday in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Bieber stated that food poisoning was to blame for his walk off. Immediately Twitter ignited with tweets from “beliebers” around the world, sending thoughts and prayers for a speedy recovery. One such hashtag that began trending was #JustinIsOurSoldier.

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Conquer The Loneliness

By: Joe Suszczynski

This past May, I made a decision that some kids my age eventually do: I moved out of my parents’ house. My grandfather died 13 years ago and grandmother sadly passed away in January. I was given the choice to move out of my parents’ house and into my grandparents’ house, where I would essentially be housesitting for my parents so that they would not have to maintain the upkeep of the property themselves.

Without hesitation, I said yes. I wanted to get out of my parents’ house because of the opportunities it would bring. I would have been absolutely foolish to pass up an offer like this.

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Lockdown Handled Properly

All eyes are on Central after the events of Monday’s tense lockdown. While most of the details of the investigation were still unknown as of Monday night, a question that has been raised is how the university handled the security crisis.

There has been praise and criticism on how students were notified and how police responded. In a press conference that was held in Alumni Hall on Monday, President Jack Miller applauded the security protocols and plans that the university had implemented. He added that due to the fact that no one was injured and that the security crisis ended swiftly that the university’s emergency systems were a success.

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Volleyball Extends Win Streak

By Sean Begin

The Central Connecticut volleyball team extended their Northeast Conference win streak to eight games on Saturday with a 3-1 victory over Bryant University.
The win was the second by Central (17-7, 8-2 NEC) over Bryant (8-21, 3-7 NEC) this season and extended the Blue Devils unbeaten record at Detrick Gym.
“The team chemistry has grown so much after a bad weekend when we opened up [NEC play] in the New York City schools and started 0-2,” said Coach Linda Sagnelli. “We did a lot of reflecting and changed a bunch of things and it’s worked ever since.”
The two losses that weekend are the only losses for Central in the last 17 games but Sagnelli says those losses “did more good for this team than anything else.”
The Blue Devils were led by sophomore Heather Trueman, who recorded a career high 20 kills with just two errors hitting .429 for the match.
“She had an outstanding performance. Today is why we had her working on hitting the line [in practice],” said Sagnelli. “She’s becoming a more complete outside hitter as these weeks go by. It’s going to happen where one day Heather becomes one of the best outside hitters in the conference.”
The Blue Devils won the final two sets of the match by scores of 25-9 and 25-17. Central outscored Bryant 16-8 in the final set to win after the Bulldogs had come back to tie the match at nine.
The Blue Devils opened the third set with eight straight points after dropping the second match 25-21. Central was down by as many as seven points in the second set and managed to pull to within one of tying the Bulldogs.
“We sat back. I think we lost mental focus, mental toughness,” said Sagnelli. “Everything that we talk about and try and maintain, we lost it.”
“In between [sets], I said here’s a great opportunity for you to regain that [focus] now because we’re going to be in tough situations as we go forward,” added Sagnelli of her team’s third set turnaround.
The Blue Devils had easily taken the first set 25-10 before going down to Bryant 12-5 to start the second set.
Central was led defensively by freshmen Cassidy Stankowski and Rachel Fish who recorded 15 and 10 digs, respectively. Junior Rachel Dunlap led the team with six block assists. Sophomore Makenna Lommori finished with a team-high 40 assists.
The Blue Devils will hit the road this weekend for two games against. They play at Sacred Heart on Saturday, Nov. 9 and at Farleigh Dickinson Sunday, Nov. 10.
“We have to prepare a lot going into Sacred Heart and FDU. Sacred Heart is very tough to play in their gym,” said Sagnelli. “We’ll be watching a lot of film this week on Sacred Heart and FDU.”
Central wraps up the regular season the following weekend at home against Saint Francis-Brooklyn and LIU-Brooklyn, the only two conference teams to beat them this season.

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Goldman Dives Into Early Success

By Sean Begin

Walking into the Jack Suydam Natatorium, the expected-but-still-pungent chlorine smell hits first, followed by a pressing humidity that settles in slowly.
At the other end of the 50 meter pool, Jessica Goldman is jumping on a gymnastics style trampoline, strapped into a belt that’s attached by guide ropes to a 30-foot tall blue metal frame.
After a few bounces to gain some height, she twists and spins, landing feet first and restarting her bounce, practicing the move a few more times. She unstraps herself and heads to the diving board where she attempts the same twist and spin move during her dive.
“It’s like a simulation of what you’re going to do in the pool,” says Goldman of the trampoline work. “I was trying to learn something new – how to twist – today.”
For Goldman, trampoline work is not new territory. In fact, neither is the spinning and flipping inherent in the world of diving.
As a kid, Goldman spent eight years in gymnastics before stopping in the eighth grade due to the sports stress on her body. Still looking to stay active, she tried several other sports before settling with diving.
“Because I had such a strong background [in gymnastics], it really came natural to me,’ said Goldman of her decision to start diving. “Everything that I did in gymnastics I basically just found a way to apply it to diving.”
Goldman, who grew up in nearby Newington, competed as a diver during all four of her years at Newington High School. During this time she attended diving camps around the country, including at Indiana University which she calls “a really amazing place to dive,” as well as participating on club teams both at Central and at Trinity College.
When the time came for Goldman to decide where to attend school, her original choices did not even include Central. “It wasn’t even on my list at first,” she says. But after looking and visiting multiple schools, nothing seemed like a good fit for her.
“I came to Central, really late in the game. I met with [diving coach] Michael [Trueworthy] and did a tour of the school. And it was like, that’s the school I was missing and it was kind of right in front of my face this entire time.”
Ironically, Goldman’s high school diving coach and Trueworthy had been members together on the UConn diving team. “It’s such a small world,” says Goldman.
For Goldman, the decision to dive collegiately was a last minute one, “but I’m so happy I did it,” she said. “It’s amazing.”
That last minute decision has seen Goldman meet great success in her freshman year as well as so far this year, her second on the team. In the NEC Championships last season, Goldman took first place in both the 1-meter and 3-meter events.
And she has started this season off by winning NEC Diver of the Week in each of the first three weeks, culminating with a win at the Blue Devil Diving Invitational last Saturday.
“She’s a totally different diver now than she was just a year ago. The scores reflect it,” said Trueworthy.
Goldman has put in a lot of time not only in the pool but in her work outside it, spending time in both the weight room and on dry land, running circuits of the campus to keep up her endurance.
“You wouldn’t think you have to because it’s just taking a few steps off a board but doing that for two hours in a row you need to have endurance,” she said.
For Goldman, all the hard work and the 6 a.m. practices and long weeks are worth it when she competes successfully. For her the goal is to not only once again compete and win at the NECs, but score high enough to earn a spot to what’s called zones, a tournament following the NECs featuring the best NCAA swimmers and divers in the region.
“I don’t want to put too much pressure but I hope that she’ll qualify for zones. She’s not too far away right now. So it’s within the realm of possibilities,” said Trueworthy.
The minimum score for zones, according to Goldman and Trueworthy, is a 260. In her win at the Blue Devil Invitational, Goldman scored a 247 on the 1-meter dive.
“I’m confident that I have a lot of potential and I see places for myself in the future and that definitely motivates me,” she said.
Goldman returns to the pool next Saturday when Vermont and Merrimack come visit Central.

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Love Your Body

By Rachael Bentley

When I was growing up, I idolized women like Kate Winslet, Topanga Lawrence, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Marilyn Monroe for their allurement and confidence on-screen. I admired and marveled at them and their beauty. As the years went on, my idea of what a beautiful woman looked like became vastly different from my initial assessment, thanks to a bombardment of social stigmas that claimed that thinner women women were more attractive.

But I should have stayed true to my original idols, because they knew the one thing trick that makes a woman truly beautiful; their bodies have nothing to do with it.

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Drake: Artist Thrills XL Center

By Aundrea Murray

Musically, Hartford has been quite fortunate with the number of celebrities to have blessed the city with their presence, and last weekend, the presence of rapper Drake was no exception. Hearts melted at the thought that not only Drake but award-winning artists Miguel and Future had plans to hit the stage to impress hundreds of CT residents. Without a ticket, one could have guaranteed themselves a poorly-spent Saturday evening.

 Traffic on I-84 that night, whether east or westbound, illustrated how successful of a show it would be. License plates from New York, Massachusetts and even as far as New Jersey congested the downtown Hartford area making onlookers curious of what the hype was all about.

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Student-Athletes Reach Out

By Paige Brown

Student athletes all around campus are becoming more involved in the community. The teams are working with groups locally and nationally to help in all different ways.

The CCSU student-athlete community outreach program is reaching all mediums of volunteerism, from reading to elementary children to hosting matches to raise awareness for breast cancer.

“We get a lot of calls from around the state asking for our student-athletes to be involved,” said Molly McCarthy, Assistant Athletic Director for Compliance & Student Services. “The word got out that our students were interested.”

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Only ‘Protected Class’ Bullying Defended By Law

By Chris Pace

Campus committees and personnel proposed changes to the faculty bullying policy which only allow certain types of harassment suits to go to court. There are strict regulations that limit legal action against certain types of bullying, leaving the remaining cases to be left unaddressed.

There are laws that state that if the instigator abuses you for “protected class” reasons, such as race, gender and religion, there can be legal action.  If the reasons are not in the protected class, it is not illegal and nothing can be done.  While some students don’t believe faculty bullying is an issue, the Committee on the Concerns of Women is trying to address it.

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CCSU Foundation Seeks New Roots, Alumni Support

By Acadia Otlowski

Currently tucked away in a quiet office in Davidson Hall, the CCSU Foundation, which provides scholarship money for students, is working to expand the amount of money it gives to the university. The CCSU Foundation, which works closely with the Office of Institutional Advancement, will be moving downtown in the coming weeks.

“We are here to advance the mission of the university,” said Christopher Galligan, the Vice President For Institutional Advancement, who states that about four percent of CCSU graduates have donated.

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The Forgotten Memorial

By Skyler Magnoli

Nestled on the border of New Britain and Newington, and placed in the back of Central Connecticut State University, the Iwo Jima Memorial is forget by most students and residents in the area. However for Marianne Mihalo and Gary Roy, who run the property, it represents pride, sacrifice and honor.

Since the memorial’s unveiling in 1995, Mihalo has been involved in the fundraising and event planning at the park. When she met her future husband Roy 12 years ago, he too became as enamored with the memorial as Mihalo. Ever since then they have worked together to keep the park running to honor the veterans and the men who died in the battle of Iwo Jima.

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Mullen Finds Patience

By Sean Begin

Ask any athlete who has met success about the need for patience and they’ll talk about how key it is to not rush, to not push, but to let the game come naturally.
For Central Connecticut golfer Monte Mullen, that lesson seems to have been learned, as evidenced by his increasingly consistent play and his win last weekend at the NEIGA Championships held in Brewster, Mass.
“He’s a very competitive guy. You don’t have to motivate him too much,” said Coach Kevin Giancola.
“My patience has gotten the best of me. I haven’t been patient at all,” said Mullen. “Coach has been working with me trying to get me to relax and calm down, sort of let golf come to me.”
Mullen, a junior majoring in finance, has done just that, saying he’s not been pushing but, rather, letting the game come to him and just having fun.
“This month…I’ve just gone out and started playing, and I think it’s made the difference in scores between September and October,” he said.
Over eight rounds in September, Mullen average a score of 74 per round, shooting 594 for the month. In October, he shot 578 over eight rounds, a 72 per round average.
More importantly, his play has become increasingly consistent. In September, Mullen shot his lowest round of the season, a second round 67 at the CCSU Blue Devil Invitational. But he also shot is highest round at VCU Shootout, carding an 80 in the third round.
Mullen’s lowest round score in October is a 70, which he has hit twice at Yale Macdonald Cup and in his NEIGA victory. His highest round was a first round 77 at the UConn Connecticut Cup.
“I didn’t notice [a change] until the first round of this past tournament up at the Cape. I wasn’t really thinking throughout the day. I was just going out and having fun,” said Mullen.
Mullen first encountered golf when he was just an infant, after his father took him and his older brother to a driving range. Mullen says his dad’s interest is what sparked his love for the game.
“He took my brother because he was old enough, but he lost interest in it and I picked up his club and started hitting with it.”
Mullen would play four years of varsity golf at Farmington High School, where he won the Connecticut Junior PGA Championship his senior year. In his junior year he won the Division I state title and the Connecticut Junior Amateur Championship.
After a lukewarm response from different coaches about playing college golf, Mullen eventually started talking with Giancola, who wanted Mullen to come play at Central. The decision to come to New Britain has proven to be a good one.
“It’s a good balance of academics and sports and it helps being so close to home,” said Mullen of attending Central.
Mullen got his first victory last season when he won the CCSU Fall Invitational. His win at the NEIGA Championship, unlike his win last year, came in a team victory as well.
“Whenever you have the personal success it’s like, yes, I accomplished something,” said Mullen. “But,” he adds, “the team win is way more important. To have four or five guys come together and shoot a good enough score to win is definitely better than the individual one.”
Mullen won last weekend’s tournament after a two-hole playoff against Joseph Leavitt of University of Rhode Island. Both players bogeyed the first hole, but Mullen hit par for the second hole to edge Leavitt.
Going into the playoff, Giancola said “I just told him to keep doing what he’s doing and just try to hit good solid shots and trust his game and trust his swing.”
“I didn’t really have too many nerves. But you sort of have to play your man, in a way, instead of playing the course,” said Mullen.
The lack of nerves may be a by-product of his more laid back play of the last few weeks. As Mullen said, “I relaxed and had some fun with it.”
The change in Mullen’s approach to the game has allowed him to have more consistency in his game, but Giancola knows there’s room for improvement.
“Monte played very consistently but he needs to work on a few things to get even better than he has,” said Giancola.
The Blue Devils, though, – who will spend the winter working on their conditioning and fine tuning their game – have certainly ended the fall season on a high note, led by Mullen.

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Men’s Soccer Wins NEC And Earns Home Field

By Corey Pollnow
Last season the Central Men’s soccer team was unable to participate in the Northeast Conference tournament because of sub-standard APR scores, despite finishing fourth in the standings. This year the Blue Devils were predicted to finish second in the NEC preseason soccer poll, but on Friday evening they proved the pundits wrong and defeated St. Francis (Pa.) 1-0 to win the NEC regular season championship.
As a result of winning the NEC regular season championship, Central will host the NEC tournament on Nov. 15 and 17 for the first time since Shaun Green became head coach in 1985. With an upstanding record of 6-0 in the NEC (9-7-1 overall) and one game remaining in the regular season versus Bryant, CCSU has the opportunity to finish undefeated in conference play.
“We worked so hard last year and it was sad that we couldn’t go to the tournament. It means a little bit extra to win it tonight,” said Steven Walmsley after clinching the first seed and home field the Red Flash.
The game winning goal versus SFU was setup by a sequence of passes which led to Zach Zurita being fouled in the penalty box in the 56th minute. The referee awarded Central a penalty kick and Green chose his sure footed senior Manny Nobre to seal the victory under pressure. Green knew all along that Nobre would be taking the penalty kick. “I texted Manny last night and I told him I had a dream he was going to score. I wanted to beef him up a bit, but I knew he was going to take the kick anyway because I have a lot of confidence in him,” said Green.
“I started running up to the ball looking to the left and before I went to take it I shifted my body to the right,” said Nobre who struck the ball into the bottom left of the goal and fooled SFU’s goalkeeper, Daniel Valcicak, into diving to the wrong side of the net.
Josef Abele saved four shots to earn his seventh save of the season and he enters the last week of regular season play ranked 19th in the country with a save percentage of .831. “We’re not league champs without Joe,” said Zurita.
Seniors Jose Gamboa, Eddy Bogle, and Nobre were honored prior to their 2-1 victory on Sunday afternoon against Robert Morris. Bogle scored his fifth goal of the season and more importantly, the game winning goal in the 54 minute of play.
Neco Brett scored his 13th goal of the season for Robert Morris in the 59th minute to reduce the deficit to one goal. Despite a late flurry of shots and chances from Robert Morris, the Blue Devils were able to hold on for the victory. Abele saved eight shots in 90 minutes and has 59 saves in 13 games this season.
Follow the Blue Devils live stream on NEC Front Row as they look to finish the season with a perfect 7-0 conference record on Sunday at 1 p.m. versus Bryant.

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Report Claims Adequate Campus Parking Available; Students Beg To Differ

By Kiley Krzyzek

Available parking for commuters, staff and students, has proven insufficient and a neusance throughout a normal school day at Central Connecticut State University. Though many attest to this inconvenience, reports show that the campus provides ample parking at all times of the day.

A 2013 Transportation Plan Study conducted by the Central Connecticut Regional Planning Agency claimed there are allegedly “1,000 free parking spaces at any given hour on campus”. The May 2012 reported that 86% of respondents drive to campus. With the CCSU student body consisting mostly commuter students, complaints about available parking are a commonality. The students reported that either there was not enough parking or that available spots failed to suit their needs; they wanted parking closer to their classes. The Official Parking Regulations, which were last revised on the website in 2003, states that everyone parking on campus, even visitors, need to have a parking pass- temporary or not. “All vehicles operating or parked on campus at any time must display valid CCSU registration decals or hang tags.” It says that all visitors must obtain temporary parking passes from the CCSU Police or designated department with granted permission, and park in designated “visitor parking spaces, if spaces are available.” Other factors impede parking unexpectedly like bans due to weather, sporting events, or an influx of visitors on campus that day. These things make it hard for students and staff to find parking. “There’s never enough spots because of sports games on the weekend and Copernicus is a maze and a traffic jam,” said sophomore Ben Bruzik. Of the 1,000 spots claimed to be available per week, 552 of these open spaces are in Copernicus garage. Popular parking locations, like James Lot, had zero empty spots. Other ideal spaces like the Student Center lot had just nine open spaces on average.  “Many respondents complained about the parking situation on campus,” the report states. “Many of the students’ comments were the same as the first survey on how there is no parking and it is hard to find a parking spot. This causes them to be late to class.” Faculty were concerned with the lack of reserved parking. However, Vance Garage is dedicated to faculty during peak hours of the day (until 5 pm). The amount of free parking spaces in Vance garage were not reported in the study. They also can park by Willard which allots for six percent of the total available spaces on campus. Parking in Vance garage, the Willard lot, and the Manaford lot are reserved until 5pm, allowing student access afterwards. Susan Sweeney, the Associate Director of Student Activities and Leadership Development says she is an outspoken advocate for students on the matter. “I would not agree that faculty do not have enough parking. I’ve never seen the south garage full, it’s in the center of campus,” she said referring to Welte garage. The report claims that Copernicus garage and Kaiser lot are both underutilized and suggests that if commuters parked there instead of circling around Welte and the Student Center garages and lots, they would then make it to class on time because it’s a small campus. “I don’t really have a problem with parking because I am a resident,” says Jill Moffett who usually parks in Copernicus. “The only time it is truly busy is about 3-5 pm and like 9-11 am,” she says. Resident students are also supposed to park in the Copernicus, Student Center or Welte Garage, though some students have qualms about certain garages on campus. Though Copernicus may have a lot of free spots, students say that it isn’t the most inviting place to park. The lack of  interior lighting makes some students feel unsafe. “Copernicus garage is awful. I don’t feel safe parking my car there because people don’t know how to drive in the garage,” explains Megan Hislop, a sophomore. Kaiser lot averaged 150 free spaces available weekly, not accounting its limited availability to students. The lot closes during inclement weather and maintenance needs to plow, along with other surface lots. There are also parking bans when there are certain sporting events going on. Outside events that come to campus also makes it more difficult for tuition-paying students to find a space to park. Sweeney commented on the volume of classes and conferences happening at once and consuming parking. “Faculty have favored times they like to teach, but is anyone monitoring that?” she advises, “Turn down conferences or tell the students so they can plan for parking. You can’t even plan. I think students don’t mind walking, it’s just different everyday.” If you click on ‘Visiting CCSU, Directions to Campus” there’s a campus map where you can see all the different parking spaces on campus without suggested parking for visitors or students. Though the study’s results remain true to their numbers, students and faculty are adamant that, in terms of convenience and efficiency, the campus still needs improving.
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Sticks And Stones

By Paige Brown

The bullying controversy surrounding the Miami Dolphins has proven that bullying has no age limit and no matter how strong you may look on the outside, words can break you down.

If you haven’t been following the story, Dolphins offensive tackle Jonathan Martin took leave after he was allegedly bullied by his teammate.

Dolphins guard Richie Incognito supposedly left voicemails, sent texts and pulled pranks on Martin, threatening his well being and bullying his teammate with racial slurs.

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Women’s Soccer Clinches NEC Tournament Berth

By Corey Pollnow
It was win or go home for the Central Women’s soccer team on Sunday afternoon versus Wagner in a game that had the winner earning a bid to the Northeast Conference tournament and the loser missing out on the postseason.
The Blue Devils went into the locker room down 1-0 to the Seahawks, but responded in the second half with three unanswered goals on senior day to defeat Wagner 3-1. Central clinched the fourth seed and will face off against the first seeded St. Francis Red Flash in the NEC tournament.
“It was a bit of a sucker punch before halftime,” said Coach Mick D’Arcy. “At halftime the message was believe in yourself and believe in your teammates. You’re going to get this done.”
“The seniors have fallen short the past couple years and not gone to the tournament,” said Coach Mick D’Arcy. “It means the world to them to be able to go to the tournament.”
In the 70th minute Morgan Santoro crossed the ball to Kerriann Welch directly in front of the goal. Welch tipped the ball to Kelly Halligan, who finished the play to give Central a 3-1 lead.
“I don’t remember who kicked it over, but I knew I had to put it away,” said Welch.
The Blue Devils took a 2-1 lead one minute earlier in the 69th minute off a free kick that was struck perfectly by Rachel Cerrone into the upper left corner of the goal from 30 yards out.
“Last week a couple girls and I stayed after practice and took a bunch of long shots and I think I made one out of forty. But, we got the free kick and Tori looked at me and said, ‘Do you want to take it?’ And I said, ‘Yeah!’ And it went in.”
Central tied the game up at one in the 49th minute when Nikki Kureczka served a ball into the penalty box that bounced once and Welch carefully volleyed the ball over the head of Wagner’s goalkeeper, Katie Marcy.
Wagner was the first team on the scoreboard three minutes before halftime. However, it was their only goal of the game. Central’s goalkeeper Nikola Deiter punched the ball away from the Blue Devil goal off a corner kick, but the ball went directly to Gabrielle Davis who struck the ball past a group of players and into the net.
Deiter finished the game with five saves and through 18 games she has a save percentage of .743 and a goals against average of 1.67.
The Blue Devils finish the regular season with a 5-3 record in the NEC and an overall record of 7-11.
“The seniors have fallen short the past couple years and not gone to the tournament,” said Coach Mick D’Arcy. “It means the world to them to be able to go to the tournament.”
This will be Central’s first berth into the NEC tournament since 2010. “The seniors have fallen short the past couple years and not gone to the tournament,” said Coach Mick D’Arcy. “It means the world to them to be able to go to the tournament.”
Central will travel to play St. Francis (Pa.) on Friday in the semifinals of the NEC tournament – the time of the game has yet to be announced.

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Respect The Classics: Batman (1966)

By Joe Suszczynski

Along with Superman, Batman has to be one of the most popular superheroes from DC Comics. With his black suit, cape, utility belt, his sense of detection, fighting skills and his vehicle dubbed “The Batmobile”, Batman is an exceptional superhero. Many movies, live action and animated, have depicted the caped crusader. There was even a television series that ran in the mid-to-late 1960s starring Adam West as the dark knight who also starred in the first live action Batman movie created in 1966.

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Thank You To The Staff

To say that this past Monday afternoon was intense is nothing short of an understatement. As I was just about to leave my job on campus to head to the Recorder office, Central was put into a lockdown and my phone immediately began ringing incessantly. Not only did I have family and friends who were concerned for my safety calling to check in, but I also had several people text me wanting news updates.

Before I even could send my first tweet, I had heard several different stories about what was possibly going on across campus. Rumors of assault rifles, masked men and potential hostages had begun circulating and people wanted to know the facts. With shaking hands at the word “gunman” I grabbed my phone and began texting the people who I knew that I could count on to gather the facts: my staff.

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The Shining

By Chris Pace

On Wednesday October 3, The Psychology Club hosted a screening of Stanley Kubrick’s 1980 horror film “The Shining in the Marcus White Living Room.

“We almost showed ‘American Psycho’ but decided to screen ‘The Shining’ instead,” CCSU student Jess Howard said.

The film has many aspects that normal horror movies do, but it’s more of a psychological thriller if anything.

“We’ve been thinking of doing this since last spring,” Howard commented.

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Steve Aoki “Aokifies” The Oakdale

By Lauren Cannon

Last Sunday Steve Aoki played at the Oakdale Theater in Wallingford and I was lucky enough to be able to see one of my favorite DJs. The “Aokify America” tour kicked off on October 4 in Chicago, and made its way all the way to Wallingford, Connecticut. The lineup varied for this tour including Wacka Flocka, Pharell, Borgore, Dirty Phonics and Felix Cartel, among others.

Most of you may recognize Mr. Aoki from last year when he played here at Central. If you are not familiar with Steve Aoki he is a DJ/producer and founder of Dim Mak records which he started in 1996 and has produced some of the amazing hits and remixes like “Turbulence” and “Pursuit of Happiness”, originally by Kid Cudi. He could be considered a House and EDM DJ here in America and around the world.

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A Yankees Fan’s Grudging Respect

by Sean Begin

Last Wednesday, the Boston Red Sox clinched their eighth World Series title in franchise history, their third in the last decade. Fittingly, it was the first title clinched at home since their championship run in 1918.

“The Boston Red Sox are the 2013 World Series Champions,” Joe Buck exclaimed after Koji Uehara made Matt Carpenter look foolish, swinging and missing on a typical Koji slider for the final out.

It’s a sentence I’ll never enjoy hearing.

As a diehard Yankees fan since I was nine, the idea of October success for the Red Sox is as comforting as a dentist’s drill boring into your teeth without localized anesthetic.

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SGA Bullet Points 10/30

By Jaimie Leasure

  • The student government allocated the Communication Club $504, $238 will be going to their entertainment budget and $266 will be going towards travel.  The club is planning on sending 10 members to NYC to tour NBC Studios.  “This trip goes perfectly with their mission statement,” said SGA Treasurer Kory Mills.
  •  The Neuroscience Club had requested to move $775, $475 would be going towards a bus and $300 going to tickets for the Body Exhibit in Hartford.  “Finance committee already denied them $100 for a tip for the bus driver, so we’re already saving money,” said Senator Lauren Hudobenko.  The senate passed the proposal with a 24-6-1 vote.
  •  SGA approved the Society of Paranormal Research of $1,000.  The club is planning on spending $300 to go to the Mark Twain house in Hartford, $400 going towards the Salem Witch Museum and $300 to see the House of Seven Gables.  They are planning on sending 50 people and will have a joint field trip with the History Club.  “The clubs are saving money by working hand in hand,” said Senator Bobby Berriault.
  •  The Pep Squad inquired about moving $200 from their coaching to their entertainment budget.  Senator Connor Fallanca said “the squad has recently been coaching themselves.”  The motion passed and the Pep Squad will now have a DJ for their Showcase.
  •  The student government allocated the Geology and Planetary Science Club $700.  The club will be attending a conference in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and the $700 will go towards accommodations.
  •  Japanese American Culture Club requested $2,800 from SGA to take a trip to NYC.  The trip will last two days and one night, they plan on taking 40 people.  The motion was passed with a 21-6-1 senate vote.

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Letter To The Editor

To the Editor,

The staff from The Recorder attended a different Open Forum than members of the Student Government and our student body attended. In a miscast and perhaps overly dramatic description of the event, the article titled “Open Forum Raises Difficult Questions” discusses a forum tension that simply didn’t occur.

Students were encouraged to attend the event to air concerns to both these groups: The Student Government and Faculty Panel. Representatives from the Academic Affairs Committee took rather copious notes that accurately recorded a variety of student concerns. Questions from students were answered directly by those who were most in the know. The article in last week’s paper alluded to consistent tension between the students and faculty panel where instead there was a mature dialogue. These misleading article phrases do not accurately depict this event: “Tension between the panel and the crowd rose…” and “The panel was silent after such an introduction to the forum.” Instead of silence and tension as the article describes, the faculty took reasonable amounts of time to respond to each concern. There was a free and forthright exchange of ideas among attendees.

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Pretty Lights Concert Review

By Sean Begin

A misperception exists about electronic music that since it’s made with a computer and not live instruments, it must not actually be music.

In reality, producing quality music on a computer requires the same amount of musical knowledge as does playing a guitar or sax or piano.

And when someone like Colorado-based producer Derek Vincent Smith, better known as Pretty Lights, comes along with knowledge of both styles, an amazingly organic blend of music is created.

Over the summer, Pretty Lights released his newest album “A Color Map of the Sun.” All of his work beforehand had been produced using samples. But in his newest project, Pretty Lights brought in live session musicians to record his own samples. These were pressed to vinyl and used as samples for “Color Map.”

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Men’s Soccer Climbs To Top Of NEC Standings

By Jaimie Leasure

The Central Connecticut Men’s soccer team came out on top versus Saint Francis Brooklyn 1-0 on Friday night. The win brings the team’s record to 7-6-1 and 4-0 in the Northeast Conference.
Freddy Metellus scored the game winning goal with 24 minutes left in the second period. Senior Manny Nobre supplied Metellus with the ball and with one shot scored the only goal of the game.
“We started off sluggish in the first half,” said Coach Green. “We let them in the game with us, at halftime we were 50/50. “
After halftime, the team came out with a different spirit. During their break, Coach Green told his players, “Guys, we have to shut them down, if we are going to make it to the playoffs, we have to do it in the next 45 minutes.”
During the second half, junior Keir Hannity put some energy into the midfield. Hannity’s parents traveled all the way from England to watch their son’s game.
Senior Eddy Bogle and Metellus worked hard together throughout the game.
“This was the best second half the team has had this season,” said Coach Green.
Goalkeeper, Josef Abele, recorded his sixth shutout of the season versus St. Francis Brooklyn.
Central’s next game will be Friday, November 1 against Saint Francis (Pa.) at 7 p.m. “Saint Francis is #1 in the region and #2 in the conference. If we’re going to win the championship we need to beat Saint Francis,” said Coach Green.

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SGA Bullet Points 11/23

By Jaimie Leasure

-Dr. Laura Tordenti reported that CCSU now has $87 million in their US Bank Account ready to build the new residence hall.  The residence hall will be built next to the Student Center Garage.

-Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu was allocated $95 for a new mat.  They were given money at the end of last semester for the mat but the price changed.  “They would just like us to cover them for the slight price increase,” said Bobby Berriault.

-The student government sanctioned $3,000 to Construction Management; $2,500 will go towards their accommodations budget and $500 for registration.  Kory Mills said, “This is a valid contingency request, the committee cut the cost to make it affordable.”

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Letter To The Editor

It is my firm belief that every person in America has the right to receive a good quality education at an affordable price. Personally, I will be graduating CCSU this May with well over $33,000 in debt from student loans. A large number of my friends are working part time or full time jobs while taking classes here. Despite our financial burden, the Board of Regents has voted to increase our tuition last March by 5.3%. And our state government has been dramatically cutting funding for higher education in recent years. Since our state government has been investing fewer dollars for higher education, Connecticut students have no choice but to pay more out of pocket in order to receive an education.

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Movie Review: Carrie

The 2013 remake of Carrie was released to theaters on October 18.  Chloe Grace Moretz stars as Carrie, a girl with telekinetic powers.  It seemed like the film was highly anticipated, but it did not make a profound impact on audiences only receiving a 47 percent critic’s rating and a 57 percent audience rating on the film review website Rottentomatoes.com

Carrie is an outcast in the film.  She grew up in a home with only her mother, a religious zealot who prays and worships God throughout her day.  Carrie was raised by the Bible and never learned many important life lessons that students learn in public and private school systems.

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Recorder Backs Recent CCSU Alumna

The mayoral election for the city of  New Britain is coming up on Nov. 5  and the students of CCSU need to pay attention. The two candidates for this upcoming mayoral race are current New Britain Mayor, Tim O’Brien, and Former CCSU Graduate, Erin Stewart.

Our editorial staff feels that a fresh, new perspective on local issues is just what the student body needs, and that Erin Stewart fits the bill.

This time last year, the New Britain City Council passed some ordinances that have had a direct effect on students living on and around campus. The ordinances focused on the landlords that own properties in the Belvedere neighborhood near campus, which is home to many CCSU students. One ordinance placed an annual fee of $150 to landlords that live outside of the area, which could potentially put an increase on residents’ rent. The second ordinance, called the “hot-spot” ordinance, states that individuals who call 911 10 or more times a year will be fined $500. 

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Competition For A Cause

By Rachael Bentley

Students on campus may have noticed a new addition to the Student Center circle this past week: an empty storage pod covered in posters that promote a new campus initiative called Competition For A Cause.

The project is only in its second year and was started by SGA Senator Simms Sonet last fall. Last year, the group of volunteers were able to raise enough donations to keep the Spanish Speaking Center in New Britain from having empty shelves during Thanksgiving.

The first time winners of Competition For A Cause were the Bimolecular Science Department, the CFO office and the Psychology Club.

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Central Honors Fallen EDGE Scholar, Football Player

By Sean Begin

Family and friends, teammates and classmates, gathered to remember and reminisce about the late Jamar Johnson last Tuesday in Alumni Hall.

Johnson, a Traveler’s EDGE (Empowering Dreams for Graduation and Employment) scholar and member of the Central Connecticut football team, passed away Aug. 2 from injuries sustained during a July 28 car crash.

“On behalf of the campus community, we offer our deepest sympathy to his grieving family and friends,” said CCSU President Jack Miller in a statement released following Johnson’s death.

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Blackfish

By Danny Contreras

When there is money to be made, the fabrics of morality are torn apart. That is the message embedded in Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s documentary “Blackfish,” which premiered on national television this past Thursday on CNN.

The 83 minute documentary’s main character is Tilikum, a 32-year old male killer whale, captured off the coasts of Iceland in 1983. In his 30 years in captivity, Tilikum has been responsible for 3 deaths, the most recent being that of Dawn Brancheau, a 40-year old trainer whom Tilikum drowned in 2010. This death would come exactly three days after the 19th anniversary of his first kill.

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Open Forum Raises Difficult Questions

By Aundrea Murray

A handful of students demanded answers from CCSU faculty, concerned with the many roadblocks on their journeys to graduation.

The Student Government Association held an open forum this week they titled the “Barriers to Graduation and the students involved did not hold back. The chilly hall was home to a heated debate over issues like transfer students missing transcripts, certain majors offering summer courses over other programs and students wondering why graduation in four years seems nearly impossible.

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Mayor O’Brien Hopes To Integrate University With Downtown Area

By Jacqueline Stoughton

New Britain mayor Tim O’Brien presented a vision of an integrated university and city as part of his campaign to be re-elected.

The mayor’s opponent, Erin Stewart, is campaigning to help CCSU students to be more involved with the New Britain community, in the form of creating more internships and co-ops.  O’Brien says he wants to do this as well, but in the form of a more advanced plan.

“CCSU could really take advantage of the busway going in right now to grow into downtown New Britain like it never has before,” says O’Brien.  “There is already a CCSU presence in downtown New Britain, but it’s now going to be practical with the bus way.”

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VIC-TO-RI-OUS

adjective – having achieved a victory; conquering; triumphant: CCSU Blue Devils were victorious against Seahawks.

Sean Begin
CCSU football scored a season high in points Saturday, rolling to a 47-13 victory over Salve Regina University.
More impressive was the 13 points allowed by the defense, which had been giving up an average of 41 points per game before Saturday. The Blue Devils also forced a season high five turnovers.
“The fact that we got five turnovers is huge. This is a team that did not get a lot of turnovers,” said Coach Jeff McInerney. “When the ball is in the air it’s ours,” he said, adding that he liked his team’s “aggressiveness getting to the ball.”
Two of the turnovers for Central (3-5, 1-1 NEC) came from a pair of interceptions by senior defensive back Chris Linares that effectively stopped what little momentum Salve Regina (5-2, 4-0 NEFC) could manage in the first half.
The Seahawks reached the Blue Devil red zone just three times in the first half, stopped on two of those occasions by a Linares interception.
Linares, a New Britain native, first picked off the Seahawks quarterback, junior Steven Wilken, in the Blue Devil end zone late in the first quarter. Linares’ second pick, at Central’s six yard line early in the second quarter, eventually led to a touchdown.
“Their quarterback is good at extending plays. We saw on film how he would juke people and find ways to get open,” said Linares. “So I just tried to stay in coverage as long as possible and as soon as I saw the ball I tried to go get it.”
Offensively, Central dominated the Seahawks from the onset, scoring early and scoring fast on the legs of junior running back Rob Hollomon.
Hollomon topped off an opening six play, 63-yard drive that took just over two minutes with a 43-yard touchdown run to put the Blue Devils on the board first.
Central got the ball back quickly following a three-and-out by Salve Regina and promptly drove down the field in under two minutes, capped off by a 29-yard touchdown run from Hollomon.
Hollomon’s third score was a season long 94-yard run that came on the heels of the second Linares interception. The run, which was two yards shy of a school record, took just 15 seconds and was the only play of the drive for Central.
Hollomon finished the game with a career high 212 yards on just 9 carries, in addition to his three scores.
“I was just able to show some of the work that I put in and some of the moves and things like that that I work on,” said Hollomon. “It’s hard work and execution but I have to give a great thanks to my coaching staff and offensive line.”
Linares also contributed on special teams, returning a short Salve Regina punt 26 yards, setting up Central for their fourth score of the day.
Sophomore quarterback Nick SanGiacomo capitalized on the Linares return, connecting with junior wide receiver Tyrell Holmes for a 20-yard score. SanGiacomo and Holmes connected for a second time on a 43-yard pass that put the Blue Devils up 35-0 going into the half.
The teams exchanged scores in the second half, after McInerney inserted his backups into the game, giving valuable playing time to players who usually see little or no game time action.
“No doubt it’s good to play, it’s good for everyone to get in,” said McInerney. “I love watching all of them play. Being part of a team is fun but it’s kind of drudgery when you never get to play.”
The Blue Devils return to conference play next Saturday, Nov. 2, on the road against Wagner.

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Inside Perspective On Racism: Then And Now

By Brittany Hill

Gov. George Wallace of Alabama stood in the schoolhouse door of his alma mater, University of Alabama, on June 11, 1963, to deter two African Americans from entering the university and of any possible integration. His daughter, Peggy Wallace Kennedy still remembers the event as the defining moment when she realized his un-American views and that he was wrong in his actions.

“I was not allowed to voice my opinion,” said Wallace. “But at 13, I knew that he was wrong.”

A crowd of well over 100 listened to Wallace speak on her unique perspective growing up with the man whom epitomized Southern views on segregation and racism as part of the Civil Rights Series at CCSU last Thursday night.

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An Heir To The Patriot Throne

By Sean Begin

In professional football, no position is more important than the quarterback. Teams have spent vast sums of money on high draft picks of supposedly franchise quarterbacks. For some teams, those choices have been wrong.
Just ask the Chargers who took Ryan Leaf second overall in the 1998 draft, behind future Hall of Famer Peyton Manning. Leaf has widely been regarded as one of the biggest draft busts of all time.
Or ask the Oakland Raiders, who drafted JaMarcus Russell first overall in 2007, signing him to a contract that guaranteed him $32 million. He was cut after three years.
Finding a starting NFL quarterback is a difficult task for any front office. Not every quarterback is a Peyton Manning or an Andrew Luck, starters who immediately came and impacted their team.
Sometimes that quarterback is taken late in the first round, like Aaron Rodgers. Rodgers was drafted by the Green Bay Packers to eventually replace Super Bowl champion Brett Favre and spent his first three seasons holding a clipboard and watching.
Sometimes a franchise quarterback is found unexpectedly in the late rounds of the draft. The New England Patriots had that fortune when it took Tom Brady in the sixth round of the 2000 draft. Brady took over for incumbent quarterback Drew Bledsoe in 2001 after Bledsoe was hurt in a game. Brady eventually took the Pats to a Super Bowl win that year.
Even though the Pats haven’t won a Super Bowl since 2005, they have still been highly competitive nearly every season since Brady took over. But Brady is now 36. When the Packers drafted Rodgers as the heir to Favre’s throne, Favre was only 35. So when does New England start to worry about replacing Tom Brady?
The Patriots currently backup Brady with former Arkansas Razorback Ryan Mallett. Mallett was drafted in the third round of the 2011 draft, becoming New England’s third string quarterback. But despite some brief flashes of potential in the 2011 preseason, Mallett hasn’t shown any real consistency to be considered a future franchise quarterback.
The 2014 draft is set up to be one of the most talented draft classes in recent memory, including at the quarterback position. Maybe the Patriots will decide to do something they rarely do: trade up in the draft to select a quarterback. Maybe they take a guy in the second round and give him some time on the bench behind Brady, similar to what Jim Harbaugh did with Colin Kaepernick.
Maybe they’ll get lucky and draft a quarterback in the sixth round who comes in during just his second professional year and leads the team to a Super Bowl victory.
The Patriots are perfectly fine right now. They were, as of this writing, sitting at 5-2, on top of the AFC East. Despite injuries and some shoddy wide receiver play, the Pats are winning and Brady looks like Brady, albeit with less than stellar numbers. That can be attributed to working with a brand new receiving corps who can’t seem to strop dropping passes.
The Pats will be just fine with Brady for the next four to five seasons, barring any catastrophic injury. But it certainly isn’t wrong of Bill Belichick and the New England front office of beginning the process of finding the eventual replacement for Tom Brady.

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Album Review: Avicii

Avicii – True

On True, Avicii’s debut album, the Swedish born DJ collaborated with a large range of musicians of different backgrounds and has sounds that bring new danceable beats.

Following the success of “Levels,” the album True, which features twelve songs, delivers a fusion between folk and house music. His first single off True, “Wake Me Up,” which so far has collected over 123 million views on YouTube since its release three months ago, combines an acoustic guitar, folky melody with Aloe Blacc’s vocals. The smash single also sets a guide for what one can expect from the other tracks.

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Netflix it! Orange Is The New Black

By Danny Contreras

When men go to prison, they usually hear the “don’t drop the soap” joke. But what advice do women receive? Actually, is anyone aware of what happens in a women’s penitentiary? What kind of unwritten rules and constructs exist in a women’s prison? These are the types of questions that Netflix’s original series “Orange is the New Black” asks and answers.

Based on memoirist Piper Kerman’s experience in prison, the eponymous series stars Taylor Schilling as Piper Chapman, a woman in her thirties, and a “former lesbian” who is sentenced to 15 months in prison for transporting drug money at the request of her former lover, Alex Vause, portrayed by Laura Prepon of “That 70s Show” fame.

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Respect the Classics: Animal House

By Joe Suszcynski

Everybody loves a good comedy movie. Perhaps one of the best classic comedy movies is “Animal House.” It came out in 1978 and was directed by John Landis who also made the movie “Blues Brothers” in 1980.

The movie takes place at the fictional Faber College in 1962 where the Delta Tau Chi fraternity known as the “Deltas” is under “double secret probation” by the uptight Dean Vernon Wormer (John Vernon). They are under such scrutiny due to their constant drunken debauchery on campus. Wormer puts Greg Marmalard (James Daughton) of the Omega Theta Pi fraternity, a more morally upright fraternity on campus but has very questionable initiations. Meanwhile freshmen Larry Kroger and Kent Dorfman (Tom Hulce, Stephen Furst) are trying to get into fraternities eventually joining the Delta House. When the Delta’s catch wind of their new fraternity status they decide to go all out, which leads them to the college experience of a lifetime.

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Education Department Confident In Continued Enrollment

By Jaimie Leasure

Despite the slight enrollment decrease within colleges and universities across the country, CCSU’s School of Education and Professional Studies is not concerned due to active faculty and upcoming new programs.

CCSU was founded in 1849 as an education school and still remains to this day to produce exceptional teachers. In the School of Education and Professional Studies, there are eight different departments including Nursing, Education, Social Work and Athletic Training.

“Currently Nursing and Social Work are the programs that are bursting at the seams,” said Michael Alfano, the Dean of the School of Education and Professional Studies.  Throughout the schooling for these programs, students are also getting real world experience along the way.

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This Week in Central Sports

by Sean Begin
• Catch the men’s soccer team Friday, Nov. 1, as they take on Saint Francis University at 7 p.m.
• The volleyball team returns to Detrick Gym Saturday, Nov. 2, after three straight road games to take on Bryant at 1 p.m.
• The swimming and diving team meet Bryant and New Hampshire at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2 in the Jack Suydam Natatorium.
• Women’s soccer faces Wagner at 12 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 3.
• Men’s soccer takes the field again on Sunday Nov. 3 at 3 p.m. against Robert Morris.

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Men’s Golf Finishes Fifth At UConn

By Sean Begin

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The Central Connecticut men’s golf team improved every round to finish in fifth place at the UConn Connecticut Cup last week at the Ellington Ridge Country Club.
“Getting better every day is important,” said Coach Kevin Giancola adding, “I’m a little disappointed we didn’t beat Bryant. UConn, Hartford and Rhode Island are big programs, but then it should have been us, and we finished fifth.”

Central finished two strokes behind conference foe Bryant University, with the Universities of Connecticut, Hartford and Rhode Island coming in first, second, and third, respectively.

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Netflix It: Super High Me

By Aundrea Murray

Does Super High Me sound vaguely familiar? For those aware of the 2004 hit Super Size Me, a documentary of a man on a strict diet of only McDonald’s, this film produced by stand-up comedian Doug Benson is a creative spin-off. Both the documentary’s name and its poster emulate the 2004 film.

Rather than gorge on Big Macs in order to prove how bad they are for you, Benson documents 30 days of pot free lifestyle and 30 days of repetitive use to compare the experience and effects of both. Keep in mind that the source of inspiration for most of his comedic material is based off of his avid use of marijuana. Benson supports the habit and is even medically approved to indulge in the plant where it is legal: California.

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Holmes Switches Sides

By Sean Begin

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In his first two seasons for the Central Connecticut football team, junior Tyrell Holmes was a key piece of the defensive secondary, working to shut down opposing wide receivers. This year, however, Holmes was placed into the position he’s so often played against.

“One day at practice I was fooling around and he [Coach Jeff MacInerney] saw me run a route against one of our defensive backs,” explained Holmes. “So he asked me to run another route. And then he said we’re going to try you at wide receiver tomorrow.”

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Women’s Soccer Splits Home Stand

By Corey Pollnow

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NEW BRITAIN, CONN. –

On many occasions Coach Mick D’Arcy has voiced his disappointment and frustration with the team’s results this season, but their match on Sunday afternoon versus St. Francis U. had the Central women’s soccer coach feeling differently.

Prior to the game D’Arcy played a motivational video in the locker room with highlights of the team’s missed scoring opportunities combined with Al Pacino’s ‘game of inches’ speech from the movie “Any Given Sunday”. The Blue Devils responded with a 2-1 win and improved to 2-2 in the NEC (4-10 overall). Central handed the Red Flash (8-7-1, 4-1-0 NEC) their first conference loss of the season.

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Fall Out Boy Releases New Mix-Tape, Pax-Am Days.

By Jacqueline Stoughton

Fall Out Boy sent fans into a frenzy last week upon the surprise release of eight new songs that have been complied into an EP titled “PAX-AM Days”.

The newest sound from Fall Out Boy is the result of a two-night recording session with singer-songwriter and Pax-Am recording studio and label owner Ryan Adams. “Fall Out Boy have clarified that ‘Pax-Am Days’ is not meant to be a proper album,” said Phillip Obsenschain in his report from Alternative Press, “but instead something more akin to a mix-tape.”

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Women’s Golf Shows Growing Pains At Rutgers

By Sean Begin

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The Central Connecticut women’s golf team showed some inexperience while finishing 14th out of 20 schools at the Rutgers Invitational last week.

“Unfortunately, we’re young and inexperienced and we went in there and it kind of got to us a little bit,” said Coach Carly Ludwig.

Despite the inexperience, youth led the team in the form of freshman Ella Williams, whose two-day score of 162 was tied for 53rd overall.

“Ella’s been knocking at the door,” said Ludwig of her young golfer. “Every time she comes off the golf course she’s found something different in her game and in her attitude towards how she plays and what she does.”

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“Hunt”ing For The Finish Line

By: Paige Brown

Hunt, Craig

With two NEC awards just this season and multiple wins under his belt, senior Craig Hunt is ready to race his way to the top and bring his team along with him.

At the beginning of this month, Hunt was named the NEC Athlete of the Week, and again just last week, along with another teammate.

He has had a victorious season, placing number one in his first race of the season at the Father Bede Invitational hosted by Saint Francis U., with a time of 26:43 against 94 runners. He also placed fifth in the New England Championship, pacing his team to win.

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Them Be Fightin’ Words

By: Paige Brown

This past Sunday, the rivalry between the New England Patriots and the New York Jets took a turn for the worst. And no, I don’t mean the ridiculous call that was made against the Pats, but what happened off the field.

In fact, it wasn’t even the actions of the players, but the fans. There is a video floating around the Internet and on top news outlets of a male Jets fan punching a female Patriots fan in the face. Talk about a real rivalry.

After a slew of fights broke out on the ramps of MetLife stadium after the Jets (luckily) won, angry and drunk fans from both sides were throwing themselves, and their fists, at each other.

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Have We Forgotten The 19th Amendment?

Mere months after the Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act, the Texas legislature approved a new voter ID measure that will inevitably discriminate against women.

Under the new law, the ID that the voter presents must match the name on their birth certificate. The majority of people that will be affected by the new laws are married women who took their husband’s names.

Additionally, those with a name change must have the original or certified copy of all documents that link their current name with the name on their birth certificates. Copies will not be allowed.

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Meditation Room Opening

By Aundrea Murray

Tranquility Room

The premiere of CCSU’s Tranquility Room (informally known as the “meditation room”) gives students ample opportunity to relax and unwind before the upcoming midterm week.

Strategically placed in the hallway adjacent to the Nutmeg Room, its location allows for complete silence among the hustle and bustle of Memorial Hall. News about the grand opening is still making its way around campus so one can expect to enter a completely solitary and tranquil room.

The desolate area makes for an incredible source of inspiration for students to find their inner being and release energy, both negative or positive. Yoga gurus, sore athletes and couch potatoes alike will make use of the meditation room to do far more than meditate.

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Fashion Spot: Fall Is Here?

 

It’s Fall Fashion Week this week at CCSU! Well, kind of. If you’re closet is as confused as the weather is, and you have no idea what to wear anymore read on. The looks on the runway that were seen at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week can be intimidating and overly artistic, but behind all that glitz and glamour there are actual tips for how to dress.

 

 

Tights are an easy way to prolong your summer favorites, like mini skirts and even shorts! A model for Zang Toi at Mercedes Benz fashion week wore black tights with strappy sandals, brown suede shorts, fur and gloves. Way too much is going on, with different textures and crazy hair. It works though, because the colors all relate. Our student model Mercedes shows you can rock the look in real life. She’s wearing patterened black tights under her favorite shorts, topped off with a graphic tee. The black tights and combat boots make the look cohesive and the splash of color in the top makes it fun. Fashion pic

 

 

Just because the weather’s confusing doesn’t mean we should wear our pastel spring dresses in October. Instead of dressing like a flower, opt for emerald green instead, the color of pine trees. Wear it with the outerwear you’re most comfortable in, like a cardigan or a faux leather jacket. This will make your look adaptable, so when it’s abnormally warm in the afternoon loose the extra layer, and when the sun sets and it goes back to being cold, throw it back on.

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Jerusalem Post Writer Visits CCSU To Talk About Middle Eastern Media

By Jacqueline Stoughton

Writer and reporter Herb Keinon visited the Central Connecticut State University campus last week to talk to students about what it’s like living in modern-day Israel while also explaining how the media portrays Israel.

According to Keinon, the portrayal differs from what the country is like in reality.

“Israel is a country that is fundamentally different from what you read about,” said Keinon.  “The media is interested in portraying positive things about Israel.  They set an agenda and decide themselves what they think is important.”

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Professor Presents Personal Publications

Kari Muzer

Dr. Karen A. Ritzenhoff of the Communication department presented two co-edited books she recently completed at “Central Authors” in the CCSU Bookstore on Oct. 17.

“Border Visions” was released in June 2013. The book, which was also edited by Jakub Kazecki and Cynthia Miller, explores how boundaries have been shifting over decades and how these border areas have served as places of cultural transfer as well as much violence. These areas include Eastern and Western Europe, the US and Mexico, and the Middle East.

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SGA Bullet Points

By Jaimie Leasure

-The Spanish Club was approved for $1440 for tickets to see Heartbeat of Latino America in New York City.  The club plans on sending 45 members with each person paying $20 out of pocket.

-The student government association approved the United Caribbean Club to move $191 from their hotel budget to conference fees.  Every year the club attends a conference in Canada, this year they will be granting 28 members the chance to attend the conference instead of 17 in 2012.

-Dr. Laura Tordenti presented the Student Affairs Report and announced that the Department of Construction Services has approved of the construction of the future residence hall which is expected to begin in spring of 2014.

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Recent CCSU Alumna Runs For Mayor Of New Britain

By Skyler Magnoli

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At the age of 16, Erin Stewart got a glimpse of what it would be like to the be mayor of New Britain. One day at school, a teacher yelled at her when his street didn’t get plowed soon enough after a large snowstorm had hit the city; apparently it was her father’s fault. Stewart’s father was mayor of New Britain at the time, and as the “first teenager” of New Britain she learned to deal with political situations earlier than most.

Now Stewart is 26 years old, and while she might never forget the memory of having her teacher make her cry, she has 10 years of experience under her belt and is better equipped to deal with potentially angry constituents, which will come in handy since  she is officially running as the Republican nominee for Mayor of New Britain.

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20 Under 20 – The Haunted Graveyard

By: Paige Brown

It’s October, and you know what that means: Halloween. With Halloween comes dark, ghostly and scary attractions for everyone to enjoy.

Lake Compounce in Bristol, CT, hosts “The Haunted Graveyard” every year throughout the month of October. The park is given a eerie atmosphere as people are spooked along their way through the houses, mazes and fields filled with monsters, ghosts and characters from classic horror movies.

The best part of “The Haunted Graveyard” is the unexpected shocks and scares. [Paige: can you rewrite this sentence into something like, "The combination of real and fake characters keep you guessing as to which wall will jump out at you" or something along those lines ] As you walk through, there are real people and fake characters all along the walls and in the nooks and crannies of the dark corners. It’s especially scary when you say out loud, “that’s fake,” and then they jump out and make you scream like a little girl.

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Machete Kills, Sort Of

Photo Credit: Google Images

Credit: Google Images

 

Joe Suszczynski

The 2010 film “Machete” was released to theaters as a “grind-house” type of movie without much for a plot, but high on action and complete with the immense blood and gore. It was entertaining and received above average remarks from critics. Three years later, “Machete Kills” was one of the two sequels made, as mentioned in the end of the first film.

This sequel does not stack up as well to its predecessor in terms of entertainment value.

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From The Internet To Real Life

By Amanda Webster

 

Facebook has presented everyone with an amazing ability to stay in constant contact with people that may not even be on the same continent. Families and long-distant friends can catch up with one another at any given time, and photos of life milestones such as weddings, baby showers and birthdays can be shared with loved ones who are unable to attend the events. However, with anything good, there is inevitably some bad.

Not only does Facebook allow you to reconnect with loved ones, but it has instilled this weird sense of commitment in users to keep everyone who comes along in life as a Facebook friend. Keeping tabs on friends and family is a great way to spend some free time, but when browsing through photos of loved ones turns into stalking an ex and their newest significant other, you need to find a healthier way to spend your downtime.

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Newly elected senators of the Student Government Association being sworn into office last Wednesday afternoon.

CCSU Turn-Out Low For Student Population; Higher Than Last Semester

By Acadia Otlowski

Newly elected senators of the Student Government Association being sworn into office last Wednesday afternoon.

Newly elected senators of the Student Government Association being sworn into office last Wednesday afternoon.

 

Despite an increase in the number of voters in the Student Government Association elections, numbers remain relatively low in comparison to the number of students eligible to vote.

There were three positions that students were able to vote for: Freshman Senator, Commuter Senator and Senior Class President.

This year, 102 voters turned out for the election of Senior Class President. This is a 20 percent increase from last semester which only had 85 voters turn out.

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Time For Another Baseball Expansion

By Sean Begin

In Sunday’s Boston Globe, Nick Cafardo wrote about the possibility of baseball returning to Montreal, former home of the Expos who relocated to Washington, D.C. in 2005. The likely candidate, says Cafardo, would be the Tampa Bay Rays.

The reason a Rays relocation makes sense is in part because of the lack of support not only for the team, but for a new stadium as well. Tropicana Field, the Rays’ stadium, has many issues, from its location to the chaotic rule book regarding balls hit against the catwalks of the roof. Meanwhile, Tampa continues to put out some of the lowest attendance numbers in baseball, despite fielding a highly competitive team every season since their historic turnaround in 2008.

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A Tribute To David Lynch

By Chris Pace

David Lynch has been making movies for almost 50 years and his style is very auteur and abstract compared to many contemporary filmmakers.  He uses strange dreams and life experiences to express the bizarre and mysterious elements for his movies.

Lynch began as an art student at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts where he hoped to become a painter.  But Lynch went a different way and turned some of his paintings into short, stop motion films. After several short films, Lynch went on to direct his first full-length film “Eraserhead(1977).  The movie has very little plot or dialogue, but it may be one of the strangest films ever made.  It took Lynch five years to finance and finish the movie.

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Panel Discusses Disadvantages For African American Voters

By Skyler Magnoli

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Central Connecticut students filled the Marcus White living room to discuss with a panel of professors the recent Supreme Court ruling on the 1965 Voting Right Acts, which has sparked a debate over voting rights in the country.

“We have some difficult days ahead,” said Dr. Benjamin Foster, a leader of Connecticut’s N.A.A.C.P. chapter.

The panel was created to educate and bring awareness to the current battle over voting rights. Dr. Foster and the panelists emphasized the 148 years of history and struggle for African Americans to obtain voting rights. They explained that for years, African Americans were subjected to unfair laws, literacy tests and threats to be kept from voting.

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Between The Sheets: Trick Or Tramp

By Lauren Cannon

It’s that time of year again, and I’m not talking about fall, or pumpkin spice lattes or going apple picking with your besties. I’m talking about Halloween. “Mean Girls” said it best: “Halloween is the one night a year when girls can dress like a total slut and no other girls can say anything about it.”  So let’s get ready because Halloween is right around the corner and you can never plan too early for your costume.

As children, we all used to dress up as our favorite Disney princesses or as the classic witch or vampire. Suddenly, when you turn 16 the game changes and we trade in the cute tutus and glittery dresses for fishnets and platform heels. This year we’ll see the classic costumes like sexy nurse, dirty police officer and of course the naughty school girl. But let us not forget the originals who paint their bodies blue and corn roll their hair to dress as an Avatar. Lastly, we’ll see the group costumes or couples costumes.

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Bookmark It! Ready Player One

By Sean Begin

For anyone connected to the world of video games, the concept of a completely immersive virtual gaming simulation has long been the subject of myth and dreams. In his novel “Ready Player One,” Ernest Cline makes that dream a reality in more ways than one.

The novel is centered on the OASIS, a massively multiplayer online game, which uses virtual reality to completely immerse the user in a video game simulation. Set in the dystopian near future of 2044, in which a Great Recession has depleted most of the world’s resources, the OASIS has become, for many people, more important than the real world.

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Republicans to Blame For Shutdown and Debt Ceiling Crisis

Republican Party Members:

Republican Party Members:

By: Joe Suszczynski

Congress thankfully opened the government back up by voting to end the shutdown and raise the debt ceiling, which did not let the country go into default. However this averted crisis should only get so much praise as funding for the government is only extended to January 15, 2014 along with the debt ceiling being extended to February, 7, 2014. The government is essentially doing what college student normally does when writing a term paper: puts it off and keeps procrastinating on when to start and complete it.

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Comeback City

 

Photo Credit: Google Images

 By Paige Brown

Sunday night was a huge night in sports for Boston fans.  The New England Patriots won in a nail-biter against the  New Orleans Saints and the Boston Red Sox came back from  a huge gap to win 6-5 over the Detroit Tigers.

Fans of Boston teams all around the country were  undoubtably on their feet in anticipation during each game.

The Pats definitely put on a show for their fans in the  stadium and at home on the big screen. Not only did Gronk  yet again miss another game, but Wilfork is now out for the  season, putting the defensive line in jeopardy against the Saints.

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Between the Sheets: T&A

Photo Credit: Google Images

Photo Credit: Google Images

By Lauren Cannon

“All I want for my birthday is a big booty hoe.” Yes ladies and gentleman, those are the wise words of refined rapper 2 Chainz. But is all that 2 Chainz wants is a big booty hoe? What about some personality, a nice smile, or maybe nice legs and a nice chest?  These are the philosophical questions I ask myself these days. So, what does it come down to? What attracts you boys?

Boobs and booty, breast and buttock; whatever you call it these are the two anatomical features of the female body that seem to be the most desirable to the male species.  Now, some ladies aren’t always well-endowed in these departments. You may have a big ass but no boobs or big boobs but no ass, or you might have both and in that case, you’re lucky. Now that it’s fall, we are seeing a lot more girls covering up there upper half in cute sweaters and scarves, but putting their lower end on display with a nice pair of leggings and yoga pants.

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