Coffee price may rise as their are supply problems

According to experts, Brazil is the world’s largest coffee producer. It has been hit hard by severe torrential weather that has hampered supplies.

South America’s supply issues are to blame

After the rising cost of making the coffee, caffeine lovers might soon be forced to pay more.

According to retail experts, Brazil is the largest coffee producer in the world. However, torrential rains have impacted supplies.

Coffee price may rise as their are supply problems

Columbian, another coffee exporter has seen anti-government protests also have an impact.

Analysts think that high street chains such as Starbucks, Caffe Nero or Costa should be able to avoid price increases.

However, supermarket shoppers could face a price increase due to concerns about supply problems that could lead to a rise in shelf costs.

Expect high street chains to keep prices down

Carlos Mera is a commodities market researcher at Rabobank. He spoke to The Grocer trade journal: “There have been challenges almost everywhere.

“Colombian exports have recovered since the protests but there’s a lot of coffee still to be shipped.

“At some point, you have to pass higher costs on to the consumer.”

Coffee price may rise as their are supply problems

It’s a matter of concern for MPs, who were told it was too early to speculate if supermarkets may have difficulties getting their products on the shelves in time for Christmas.

 

The pandemic, furlough, and Brexit have caused a shortage in HGV drivers. This has left shelves empty across the UK with key product lines being affected.

Wetherspoon was also the latest victim to the shortage of HGV drivers after it became clear that the company was short of beers.

After admitting that some of its 837 outlets were short of popular brands, the pub chain apologized.

Andrew Opie, British Retail Consortium director of sustainability and food, stated: “Christmas is going to be incredibly challenging in some areas.”

However, he said that it is. “too early to predict that we’re going to have problems at Christmas.”

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