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CCSU Speaks Up

Photo: Erin O’Donnell
Danny Ravizzo beats a drum leading members of the tuition rally Monday afternoon around the Student Center Circle.

By Amanda Webster and Acadia Otlowski

Colorful banners and chants criticizing imposed tuition hikes for Conn. state colleges filled the Student Center Circle Monday afternoon as students and faculty came together to voice their opposition at a tuition rally.

Student Alexa Pagnani watched the rally unfold from the sidelines. “I think it’s really good that they are rallying,” said Pagnani. “It’s pretty ridculous that we all have to pay more for an education.”

The Board of Regents is considering a 5.1 percent increase for students, which would cost students an additional $800 in tuition.

Pagnani, who is a freshman, said that she heard tuition increase has been the trend in recent years and is worried that if this motion to raise tuition this year passes then it will only continue to increase.

“If it’s starting at $800, I don’t want to know what it’ll be like when we’re seniors.”

Student Government president Eric Bergenn organized the event in order to get students to voice their opinions on the matter.

“Today we are calling on the state to invest in us,” Bergenn said to an enthusiastic crowd. “It’s time to stand up to people who tell us that we are not important enough to invest in.”

SGA Senator Bobby Berriault addressed the crowd about his concerns over rising tuition. According to Berriault, around 3,000 students will graduate from CCSU at the end of this semester. Of those 3,000, approximately 90 percent will stay in Conn. to find jobs. With the majority of graduates staying in state and paying taxes, Berriault said that more  money should be invested into state colleges so that students are able to afford the education needed to succeed later on.

“The Governor does not have the final say in how state funds are allocated,” stated Berriault. “If the people of Connecticut are to have a better future and a better tomorrow, we need to invest in all of Connecticut’s colleges and not just a few,” continued Berriault.

Much attention has been directed towards the $1.5 billion invested in UConn’s STEM program and with both rising costs of tuition and budget cuts for the CSU system, many people have been left with questions as to why the other state colleges have been financially neglected.

“I personally support any investment in UConn. However, I also support an investment here at CCSU,” Bergenn stated during the rally.

“I think that people are tired of being in debt,” said student Daniel Piper, a member of the Youth for Socialist Action.

“I don’t think they like the idea of debt hanging over them and their work life being overshadowed by that. It’s totally wrong, I think this state and this country are both wealthy enough to go to school for free, get a job and get healthcare for all. It’s insane, it’s absolutely insane what we are being deprived of. There is no reasonable explanation for it,” stated Piper.

“It’s cool to see students come together for a greater cause,” said sophomore Steve Blanchard.

Blanchard said that he hopes that more students from the CSU system will come together and travel to the capitol together to make their voices heard.

“It’s our voice, it’s our campus and our rights. It’s all on us. We’re the ones to make it happen.”

Editorial: Worth The Price Of Admission

Last week the Connecticut Board of Regents approved a tution hike of almost four percent for the CSU Schools, which includes our university, as well as the 12 community colleges in the state. The increase may currently seem like a hassle for some students, but our institution can only benefit from these changes.

If you take a look at our campus, you can already see where the money is going. With a new academic building on the way for 2013 as well as future plans for a new residence hall, cafeteria and police station, it is evident that our money is being put to good use. It is not being spent in ways that will not benefit the entire student body or being funneled to a certain department.

Some may argue that they will not be here to set foot into any of these new buildings, but one must remember the welfare of this university will follow you after graduation. When asked what university you attended in the near future, one should feel a sense of pride that you graduated from CCSU. That pride can grow over the years as you continue to see CCSU prosper. If one were to discuss the state that this university was in 30 years ago, you would be astonished to see the improvements that  have been made. Alumni continue to come back to take part in the CCSU community and events because they are proud of the accomplishments the university has made.

Taking a look at other universities in Connecticut that do not fall under the CSU schools’ jusrisdiction, the amount that students have to pay in order to receive an education is well above what the average student here has to pay. A commuter student at Quinnipiac University pays $36,000 per year, where at CCSU an in-state resident pays approximately $18,000. The difference between the two is significant, and should be enough to convince CSU students that an extra $600-700 is really nothing in comparison.

UConn will raise its tuition by six percent for the fall semester and in-state undergraduates will pay $22,430, while also facing a steady climb to an almost seven percent increase by 2016. These hikes were unanimously approved in December and also adds to the fact that our tuition could be more expensive if the Board was to use UConn as a benchmark.

Students at CCSU enjoy looking down on this university for countless reasons, but they need to realize that the fact the university is making an effort to improve itself and its facilities is commendable. Education is an industry in the U.S., unlike most other countries, and we should all feel priveleged and want to contribute towards improvment. Thinking about all that a student can do with their time at CCSU, it seems like a 3.7 percent increase is a small sacrifice when looking at the big picture.

Our university has a plethora of clubs, committees and sponsored events that students can take advantage of and, even though there are many that do not jump at these opportunities, that is no reason to say that one should not want to pay a small increase in tuition. There are many at this school that want to take full advantage of what the university has to offer, and we should not forfeit that because of a lack of state funding.

Board of Regents Increase CSU Tuition Rates

By Kassondra Granata

The state Board of Regents approved a tuition increase last Thursday of almost 4 percent for the CSU Schools as well as the twelve community colleges.

For students living on campus, there will be an increase of 3.7 percent, or about $676 where students commuting will face an increase of 3.8 percent, or $315. Community college students will pay 3.1 percent more, about $108.

According to Board of Regents President Robert Kennedy, the increase will go into effect for students entering the fall of 2012.

Kennedy says that the source of revenue for colleges and universities comes from state support and student tuition. He also said that even though no one wants to increase the cost of college tuition, this is the only option.

“For the past couple of years, state revenue has been dropping and the budgets provided by the states to the colleges have decreased as well,” said Kennedy. “Along with increase costs and declining state revenue, the only source of income for the colleges is tuition.”

At the Jan. 19 meeting, two student members of the board of regents opposed the increase. Alex Tetty Jr, Chairman of the Board of Regents Student Advisory Committee, voiced his opposition while Michael Fraser, vice-chair of the committee, said that the increase should be higher.

According to Kennedy, one of the main concerns that the board faced was where the money would go towards.

Kennedy said that the money from the tuition increase would be directed towards faculty and student support services, such as counseling, but the campuses will still get less money in their budgets.

In terms of there being a set limit on raising the tuition in the future, Kennedy said he was unsure of the possibility.

In the last several years, the increases have been lower than the historical average and the national average, according to Kennedy.

Last year, a 2.5 percent tuition increase was approved as well as a credit card transaction fee that created an additional 2.5 percent for a student using their card to pay for a bill. In 2010, there was a 5.6 increase for students living on campus and a 6.3 percent for commuter students in January that proceeded a tuition freeze in September that kept fees at the same level. In 2009, students saw a 5.3 percent increase in their tuition for the fall 2009 semester.

“The board expressed a strong support for keeping the tuition to a minimum,” said Kennedy. “We can’t really anticipate what the cost drivers are nor can we anticipate what the support from the state will be, so it has to be done on an annual basis. But from our discussion yesterday, we want to keep the tuition low.”

Kennedy said that some colleges across the country have made attempts to set a tuition limit, but had to back away due to the cost drivers that would affect them long term.

“A few years ago we sort of levered off, but when fuel prices and heating costs were going up in 2005-2006, it was really difficult to tell so it really needs to be done on an annual basis,” said Kennedy.

Student Government Association President Eric Bergenn and Treasurer Nick Alaimo are continuing to be active in working with the administration.

Alaimo is the CCSU representative on the Student Advisory Committee to the Board of Regents and was on the fence about the tuition increase.

“We want to keep the quality of our education high, but we still need to work within our means and be affordable,” said Alaimo. “I would like to see if we could be a part of the process in the future.”

President Bergenn said that Alaimo’s willingness to represent CCSU on the Board of Regents is very helpful.

“As to the tuition increase of 3.8 percent, it’s safe to say that no one wants to pay more for the same product they’ve been getting, but with cuts in state funding, it’s an inevitable reality if we want to keep the quality of the education we’re paying for the same,” said Bergenn. “We were expecting, from what Governor Malloy had proposed, a 2.5-3% increase as a result of the cut in state funding.”

Bergenn also said that there are other actions that students can take in order to try to alleviate the cost of education.

“We could be at the state house working with representatives and lobbying for more higher education funding. We could be working more closely with our representative in the Senate of the SGA, Faculty Senate, and front office administration on finding ways to economize the management of the university,” said Bergenn. “It’s important to not react to these things with the attitude that we are helpless.  We are only as helpless as we choose to be.”

Breaking Down The New Fees

By Jonathan Stankiewicz

Oct. 1 is coming, consider yourselves warned.

Starting this Saturday, the way students will be paying for things will be drastically changed.

All credit card payments will be accepted online only and will be processed through the online QuickPAy ebill/payment service provided on CCSU’s Web Banner system. No mailed, faxed or in-person credit card transaction will be accepted. Debit cards will also be accepted online and will be processed as a credit card transaction subject to the same 2.5% convenience fee.

It should be of note that the convenience fee is only added when a credit card is chosen as the method of payment and added only at the time a payment is made.

“Other schools in the CSU System requested it as a way of targeting the cost involved in accepting credit cards to those using this method of payment, rather than the whole student body absorbing the cost with increased tuition and fees,” said Bursar Betsy Fan Fangiullo.

Fangiullo wants students to understand that paying by eCheck/ACH from a checking or savings account carries no fees so if they were previously using a branded debit card, they should instead enter the routing information for their bank account.

“If they were previously using a branded debit card from a checking account, they may instead enter their bank routing information so they are not assessed the fee,” added Fangiullo.

To help combat the new 2.5% increase students can take advantage of Central’s current payment plan for next semester, though there isn’t any room to expand the five installments per term.

But in CCSU President Jack Miller’s report card in “Objective 2.11: Increase the total amount of financial aid awarded,” Financial Aid and Student Affairs greatly surpassed the $52.7 million in aid given out in the 2005-06 academic year. For the 2010-11 academic year they were able to award $88 million to students, greatly surpassing their goal of $65 million.

Today many people have Visa cards and the Bursar’s office and Fangiullo understand that. Due to compliance with PCI regulations CCSU can no longer accept them.

“Visa regulations do not allow for flexibility in the assessing of a convenience fee and require that when accepting Visa and charging a convenience fee, an institution must charge the fee on all methods of payment, not just to credit cards, as well as a requirement that the fee be a flat or fixed amount, rather than the percentage as approved by the Board of Trustees,” Fangiullo said.

Or we can just say “Visa regulations do not allow a convenience fee charge unless the fee is also charged for every payment method (check, cash),” says the Bursar’s website about Visa acceptance being discontinued.  “Due to these restrictions CCSU will not be able to accept Visa credit card as a method of payment.”

Fangiullo is adamant that this new fee “is not a way to push more people to pay online.”

“Paying online continues to be the most secure, accurate, accessible and convenient method of payment,” Fangiullo said.  “The QuikPAY eBill/ePayment service has been certified compliant with credit card security regulations, ensuring continued security for students and authorized payors’ financial data.”

The entire CSU system has been affected and the Bursar’s offices have worked together accordingly.

“The four Bursars have worked closely with each other throughout this implementation,” Fangiullo said. “We have done the research on other schools that have made similar transitions and have received positive feedback from all.”

Fangiullo said that she and the Bursar’s office will continue to ensure a smooth transition for students.

“As the forms of currency/payments evolve, I understand the need to make changes but also understand that these changes may be difficult for some of our students,” said Fangiullo.

Credit Card Convenience Fee to Take Effect in October

By Justin Muszynski

The much talked about credit card convenience fee that was approved this past spring by the CSUS Board of Trustees will begin on October 1st.

Any credit card that is used to pay for a student’s tuition will be subject to a non-refundable 2.5 percent fee.

According to Betsy Fangiullo of the bursar’s office, the fee is implemented by the credit card company and it’s important to remember this is not just a CCSU fee, but is customary practice with credit cards.

“These funds will be deposited in to the University’s general operating account,” said Fangiullo. “Fees charged to vendors for accepting credit cards are standard in the industry.”

Also something to note, is the new fee is only on the portion that is processed with a credit card. For example if a loan covers most of your tuition and the remainder that the student has to pay is $100, they are charged 2.5 percent of that.

This is not something exclusive to CCSU. All the CSU schools will charge the same fee and schools like UCONN, the University of Hartford, and Sacred Heart already have a similar fee in place.

Fangiullo says there are other options that the bursar’s office will accept including electronic checks, cash, checks, or money orders. However, credit cards will no longer be accepted in person, online will be the only way to use them.

“Due to PCI compliance regulations, we are not able to accept them in person,” said Fangiullo.

Visa cards will no longer be accepted due to certain restrictions. Visa stipulates that if a convenience fee is charged to the cardholder, the vendor must also implement this fee to all payment methods, which CCSU has chosen not to do, thus discontinuing the ability to pay with Visa.

It’s also important to remember that debit cards are not exempt from this new fee.

“Debit card transactions will also only be accepted online and will be processed as a credit card transaction subject to the same 2.5 percent convenience fee,” said Fangiullo.

Fangiullo also says the bursar’s office is not trying to catch students off guard with this fee and they are taking the necessary steps to make sure that doesn’t happen.

“We are sending out postcards and electronic messages and have information posted on our website,” said Fangiullo.

CSUS Board Approves 2.5 Percent Tuition Increase

Adds Extra 2.5 Percent Increase for Students Using Credit Cards

By Matt Clyburn

The Connecticut State University System Board of Trustees approved a 2.5 percent increase in tuition and fees for more than 36,000 students last Thursday, along with a new credit card transaction fee that will impose an additional 2.5 percent for student using a card to pay their bill.

The credit card transaction fee was a last-minute addition to the board’s proposed changes and aligns to similar fees charged at other local institutions of higher education, including UConn.

According to the Hartford Courant, officials estimated that nearly 40 percent of CSUS students use credit cards for payment, in whole or in part.

Students also have the option to enroll in the CENTRAL Payment Plan for a $35 fee, which allows payers to divide the cost of attendance into five equal monthly payments.

It is unclear whether students using credit card-branded debit cards would be charged the fee, but students may use an ‘e-check’ to have payment drawn electronically from any bank account. CCSU students may also use a personal check, money order, cashier’s check or a Blue Chip debit account to make payment of tuition and fees.

A press release from the CSUS said that the increase is the smallest since 2000, but follows a vote by the board in September 2010 that indicated tuition would be frozen for next year.

“It is important that CSUS maintain the accessibility and affordability of its universities to the greatest extent possible,” said Angelo Messina, chairman of the Finance and Administration Committee, in September. “Our students and potential students are among those that are most affected by the prolonged economic downturn.”

Tuition and fees will increase by an average of $198 for in-state undergraduate commuters and $446 for in-state undergraduates that living on campus, according to a press release from the system.  Exact rates will vary based on university, course schedule and additional program requirements.

Another change approved by the board Thursday will add a lab fee for nursing students to provide required materials during non-lecture course sessions.

Board Vice Chairman Richard J. Balducci echoed Governor Dannel Malloy’s recent call for shared sacrifice and said that cost-cutting measures are being implemented across the system to keep the tuition increase at 2.5 percent.

The governor asked Connecticut public universities and colleges earlier this year not to raise tuition by more than the level of inflation. Since the request, state officials have pegged the rate of inflation at 2.5 percent and the University of Connecticut trustees voted a tuition increase at precisely that rate just a few weeks ago.

The system-wide tuition increase last year was 6.3 percent for in-state undergraduate commuters and 5.6 percent for in-state undergraduate campus residents.

“Currently, the cost of tuition and fees falls about midway compared with public universities in the Northeast, and is the lowest when compared with 11 competitor universities in the region which CSUS students had considered attending,” the CSUS statement said.

Miller Talks Tuition Hike, Reminds Senate CCSU Is Still Cheapest in State

By Kassondra Granata

A day before the Connecticut State University System Board of Trustees passed a 2.5 percent tuition increase for all four CSUS schools, President Jack Miller spoke to the CCSU Student Government Association about the hike, making sure the senate understood that CCSU is still one of the least expensive schools in the region.

“At Central we are the least expensive four-year institution in the state,” said Miller. “Our tuition and fees and our overall cost are the least.”

Miller stressed the fact that CCSU will remain the least expensive state school despite the cut.

“For a commuting student here it’s $500 less than for a commuting student at Eastern,” said Miller. “If you are living on campus compared to Southern, it will be $600 less, with Western $700 less, Eastern $700 less and UConn $2500 less.”

President Jack Miller shows just how small the tuition hike is. Photo: Kenny Barto.

The 2.5 percent increase that proposed by the CSUS Finance and Administration Committee of the Board of Trustees at all four State universities is the smallest one-year increase since 2000.

“If you are a commuter you’ll either be $50 less, $200 less or $500 less depending upon whether you are talking about Western, Southern or Eastern,” Miller said.

Miller hopes that the senate will send his input along to fellow students that might have questions concerning the tuition increase topic.

“You’ll get questions from people,” Miller said. “I’d like you to be able to have the information to give to these students.”

Miller encouraged the senate that regardless of the tuition increase, CCSU will still remain to be a great institution.

“While 2.5 percent is an increase and I think in these times it’s tough to justify any increase because everyone’s struggling,” Miller said. “I think that holding it down to 2.5 percent and making sure we still remain to be the best value in terms of access is an important thing for everyone to remember.”

Editorial: Proposed Tuition Hike Shouldn’t Come As Surprise

With the news coming last week that there will most certainly be a tuition hike for the 2011-12 school year, members of the CSUS Board of Trustees should be ashamed of themselves.

Last September, members of the Finance and Administration Committee recommended a tuition freeze to ease the financial burden on students in a withering economy. Though circumstances have changed in Hartford, both with a new governor and a reinvigorated legislature, they most certainly have not for our student peers here in New Britain.

The Board of Trustees must act as a figurehead of the university system it represents, not a doddering collection of suits bending to the slightest of political winds. We hoped that this group of individuals would represent our interests at the state level rather than engage in the games that brought us to our present circumstances. We were foolish and wrong, they failed us.

The proposed hike begs the question: is anyone really surprised? Given the circumstances, no one should be.

There’s a sense of urgency surrounding the state’s budget situation and what needs to be done to make ends meet. How is the school going to afford to pay its teachers? How will the school pay for the tools and technology needed to run a 21st century university? These are reasonable questions that allude to a debate worth having.

But if you were naive enough to believe that CSUS tuition rates would stay the same, you are hopefully in the minority. Any time that a state institution tells you that they will freeze prices but still leave the option open to raise the rates, it’s can be assumed they were just saying so to keep people happy and quiet.

Happy and quiet indeed; despite 11 straight years of tuition increases, our peers have remained silent. Meanwhile, these colleagues substitute a slow and incremental financial death for a swift and striking one.

Members of the board justify our present circumstance by highlighting the fact that CCSU is still among the least expensive universities in the northeast. But these officials know that the average public university student spends much more time in residence than their private university counterparts. So which will it be, exorbitant tuition for four years or marginally increasing tuition for six?

We expect higher participation in public policymaking from our fellow students and a greater degree of advocacy from our representatives within the Board of Trustees, but we haven’t seen it. Until we do, we’re going to see CSUS leadership parade around their false tuition freeze publicity to raise student body morale.

It’s apparent to this staff that the people who are being affected by these decisions will be the last to help prevent a future gaffe like this from happening again.

CSUS Committee Approves Tuition Increase, Board to Vote Thursday

By Matt Clyburn

Credit: CSUS

The Connecticut State University System’s Finance and Administration Committee approved a 2.5 percent tuition increase for the four state schools in a meeting at Eastern Connecticut State University last Thursday.

A vote will be held by the full Board of Trustees this Thursday at Southern Connecticut State University to determine whether the increase will go into effect for the 2011-12 academic school year.

A press release from the CSUS said that the increase is the smallest since 2000, but follows a vote by the board in September 2010 that indicated tuition would be frozen for next year.

“It is important that CSUS maintain the accessibility and affordability of its universities to the greatest extent possible,” said Angelo Messina, chairman of the Finance and Administration Committee, in September. “Our students and potential students are among those that are most affected by the prolonged economic downturn.”

The state contributes funding that totals nearly 40 percent of the CSUS annual budget, down from 48 percent a decade ago, according to the resolution adopted in September.

Many students expressed concern with the committee’s recommendation given the board’s action in September.

“I feel like it’s unfair because I’ll be a student here next year and I think we pay enough is tuition and student fees,” SGA Commuter Senater Sasha Savage said in an interview.  “It’s just unfair to the students that are coming here.”

Still, others saw the tuition hikes coming.

“I’m glad that it’s one of the lower increases because we know it’s going to happen every year,” said SGA Interim Vice President Liz Braun. “I’m upset about the tuition hike, but I’m not shocked that they went back on their word.”

While CSUS officials said that current enrollment levels should be maintained, they could not say if reductions could affect the current system-wide faculty/student ratio of 16 to 1.

“As reductions grow, it becomes more difficult not to adversely impact the academic experience of students,” the press release said.

If the board passes the measure, tuition and fees would increase by an average of $198 for in-state undergraduate commuters and $446 for in-state undergraduates that living on campus, according to the press release.

Board Vice Chairman Richard J. Balducci echoed Governor Dannel Malloy’s recent call for shared sacrifice and said that cost-cutting measures are being implemented across the system to keep the tuition increase at 2.5 percent.

“Proposing the lowest tuition increase in more than a decade…underscores our recognition of the financial pressures facing our students and their families, as well as the imperative to preserve the caliber of education we provide,” said Balducci.

Malloy’s budget proposals have sent many in the CSUS in a flurry to find a solution to a potential $22 million gap facing the system over the next two years. The tuition increase could bring nearly $8 million in additional revenue and leave around $14 million to be made up by additional spending cuts.

The governor asked Connecticut public universities and colleges earlier this year not to raise tuition by more than the level of inflation. Since the request, state officials have pegged the rate of inflation at 2.5 percent and the University of Connecticut trustees voted a tuition increase at precisely that rate last week.

The salary freeze, which will go into effect in fiscal year 2012, will impact non-union personnel at all four state universities, including the chancellor, university presidents and vice presidents, deans of students, police chiefs, human resources administrators, confidential administrative assistants and system-level management and confidential staff. The salary freeze was first suggested in July by CSUS Board Chairman Karl J. Krapek and Chancellor David G. Carter, both of whom have retired from their positions.

According to the CSUS statement, the system has saved nearly $50 million in recent years by implementing cost savings and cost avoidance measures to soften the impact of cuts in state contributions, increasing payroll expenses, and other costs that rise higher than the rate of inflation on an annual basis.

The system-wide tuition increase last year was 6.3 percent for in-state undergraduate commuters and 5.6 percent for in-state undergraduate campus residents.

“Currently, the cost of tuition and fees falls about midway compared with public universities in the Northeast, and is the lowest when compared with 11 competitor universities in the region which CSUS students had considered attending,” the statement said.

A freeze on the salaries of university management personnel adopted by the board in September will remain, a measure that will affect university presidents and vice presidents, deans of students, police chiefs, human resources, confidential administrative assistants and system-level management and confidential staff, among others.

UConn Raises Tuition 2.5 Percent

By Matt Clyburn

UConn’s Board of Trustees approved a 2.5 percent increase in tuition, fees and lodging last week in a nearly unanimous vote.

Political science student Corey Schmitt was the only member of the board to vote against the rate hike after mounting an unsuccessful campaign to raise the cost by more than five percent.

Schmitt and a few of his classmates argued that the benefit of a low increase would be offset by larger class sizes and fewer university services.

“I am not confident with the…increase,” Schmitt said, citing the fact that he has been forced to commute to the UConn Greater Hartford campus weekly for a class that is full in Storrs.

“We’ve already seen class sizes double,” classmate Rich Colon said at the board meeting. “The cuts that we’ve seen over the last few years are relatively small compared to what we’re going to see in the future.”

The tuition hike was proposed in a March 23 letter to the board from Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Peter Nicholls. Nicholls said that although some class sizes might increase next year because of the budget conditions, he expects the impact to be “very limited.”

On a list of 18 similar private and public universities, UConn was ranked ‘most affordable’ at a total cost to in-state students that live on campus of $21,198. Room and board expenses were also compared with UConn ranking ninth ‘most affordable’ of 22, just $202 more than CCSU.

The Associated Press reported that the 2.5 percent increase is the smallest in six years, adding $518 to in-state undergraduate bills and $950 for out-of-state undergraduates. It brings annual tuition, room and board to $21,486 for Connecticut residents and $38,382 for out-of-state students.

Changes at the Capitol have effected the university’s ability to make ends meet as Gov. Dannel Malloy recently vowed to cut general fund contributions to the school by $25 million each year. The shifting political winds and down economy have left UConn more than $45 million short for the current fiscal year’s budget.

Board members warned that they may need to revisit the issue in June if more spending cuts cannot be found. They will explore the possibility of cutting non-faculty pay in the coming weeks to make up some of the funding.