Editor’s Column: Consistently Lacking Consistency

By Nicholas Proch

The human race is doomed. We can see the end of the Mayan calendar approaching and most of us passed through ‘judgment day’ without fretting. If this prophecy turns out to be true, I’m afraid to hear what my judgment was. In fact, most of us should be fearful of that, but we were all busy pointing and laughing at Harold Camping, the pastor who got his rapture predictions to the forefront of the evening news, back tracking on what he said to his undiscerning followers for the past 25 years. His terminal lack of conviction to his faith not only destroyed his reputation, but is just one example of the many of where we are headed as a species.

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Editor’s Column: The Power Of ‘Peanuts’

By Nicholas Proch

There is a scene in A Charlie Brown Christmas that I consider to be a contender for the most-influential moment of my childhood. It may only fall short of the first time I heard The White Album and when Aaron Boone showed me to never take anything for granted.

From public pleas to my peers for their participation in our publication, to the point I brought up last week that it’s Apple users versus everyone else, the message of this segment finds its way into my daily thought process, admittedly sometimes without my knowing, more than anything from a cartoon should.

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Editor’s Column: Loyal Users Will Ruin Apple

By Nicholas Proch

The meaning behind all advertisements and marketing campaigns inevitably change over time, but Apple’s ’1984′ Superbowl commercial still holds the values that Steve Jobs had until his passing. Someone should make the current executive board watch the should-be outdated clip.

The lone airing for the commercial was during the third quarter of the 1984 Superbowl. That’s all it needed. It showed the world what Apple, and specifically the Macintosh computer, was all about.

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Editor’s Column: When We’ve Crossed The Line

The time has come and gone that the public can handle using anonymity. There was once a time when a source could remain hidden to protect themselves and only in those situations was their name hidden. We’ve now reached a point, in both social practice and technology, that remaining unnamed is an obvious problem.

Letters to the editor at a newspaper publication are checked. They are fact checked. They are then checked to make sure that they came from whose desk they claimed to have been penned from.

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