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Calendar 12.1 – 12.8

MUSIC

12.2
Abandon All Ships
@ Webster Underground
Hartford, CT
$10 / 630pm doors

12.3
Twiztid
@ Webster
Hartford, CT
$20 / 7pm doors

The Nerds
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$12 adv. / 8pm doors

Max Creek
@ Pearl Street
Northampton, MA
$15 / 9pm

12.4
Nonpoint
@ Webster
Hartford, CT
$16 adv. / 630pm doors

12.7
Hinder
@ Webster
Hartford, CT
$25 adv. / 6pm doors

FILM

12.1 – 12.4
The Social Network
@ Cinestudio
Hartford, CT
$8 / 730pm

A sure bet for inclusion on critics’ list of 2010’s Top Ten Films, The Social Network is a kinetic, supercharged suspense movie about the invention of Facebook. Director David Fincher, whose villains were only slightly more ruthless in his films Se7en and Zodiac, taps right into the genius, ambition and betrayal that turned one Harvard undergrad (Steve Zuckerman) into the country’s youngest billionaire; leaving some of his friends and collaborators in the dust. Along with a chilling performance by Jesse Eisenberg, there’s Justin Timberlake as Napster creator Sean Parker, and soon-to-be-stars Rooney Mara (chosen to play Lisbeth Salander in the US version of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo), and Andrew Garfield, the next Spiderman.

12.5 – 12.8
Waiting for Superman

@ Cinestudio
Hartford, CT
$8 / 730pm

Not since Davis Guggenheim’s last film (An Inconvenient Truth) has a documentary had the potential to get people engaged in averting catastrophe. In this case it is the inadequate and unfair education of American children, especially among the poor. Alternately scathing, matter-of-fact, and simmering with outrage, Waiting for Superman details drastic decline and also some innovative ways forward in American schools. Getting to the heart of the matter, Guggenheim follows the drama of five children hoping to win a place (by lottery) in a charter school that may make or break their futures. A must-see movie for educators, parents, policy makers, and anyone who claims to care about social change. “By showing how fiercely dedicated idealists are making a difference, it is a call to arms.” Stephen Holden, New York Times.

CCSU

12.1
ACabellas
@ Founders Hall
7pm

12.2
Ebony Chorale Ensemble
@ Founders Hall
7pm

12.4 – 12.5
Albano Ballet – “The Nutcracker”
@ Welte Auditorium
3pm
Tickets available at Albano Ballet website

12.5
ACapella Fall Concert
@ Founders Hall
7pm

12.8
Divisi
@ Founders Hall
730pm

Calendar 11/17-11/24

MUSIC

11/17
Allstar Weekend
@ Toad’s Place
Hartford, CT

11/19
Combichrist
@ The Webster
Hartford, CT
$18/7 p.m. doors

11/20
Terror
@ The Waterfront
Holyoke, MA

The Acacia Strain
@ Waterfront Tavern
Holyoke, MA

11/24
Deep Banana Blackout/I Anbassa
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$18.50/8 p.m. doors

FILM

11/19 – 11/20
The Goonies
@ Bow Tie Cinemas
Hartford, CT
$10/11:30 p.m.

Leonard Maltin wasn’t alone when he noticed similarities between Goonies and the 1934 Our Gang comedy Mama’s Little Pirate. Adapted by Chris Columbus from a story by Steven Spielberg, the film follows a group of misfit kids (including such second-generation Hollywoodites as Josh Brolin and Sean Astin) as they search for buried treasure in a subterranean cavern. Here they cross the path of lady criminal Mama Fratelli (Anne Ramsey) and her outlaw brood. Fortunately, the kids manage to befriend Fratelli’s hideously deformed (but soft-hearted) son (John Matuszak), who comes to their rescue. The Spielberg influence is most pronounced in the film’s prologue and epilogue, when the viewer is advised that the film’s real villains are a group of “Evil Land Developers.” The musical score makes excellent use of Max Steiner’s main theme from The Adventures of Don Juan, not to mention contributions by the likes of Richard Marx and Cyndi Lauper. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

11/21–11/23
Henri-Georges Clouzot’s Inferno
@ Trinity College (Cinestudio)
Hartford, CT
$8/7:30 p.m.

In 1964, director Henri-Georges Clouzot, whose films Wages of FearQuai des Orfèvres and The Raven are classics of 1940s French cinema, became obsessed with making an experimental film that would prove his relevance to the young & cocky directors of the Nouvelle Vague. Inferno is that legendary film, crushed by the mania that led to Clouzot’s heart attack, and the collapse of star Serge Reggiani. Luckily, Clouzot’s widow discovered 85 cans of the film, allowing Serge Bromberg to create a documentary mixing original footage with interviews and re-enacted scenes from the script. Most tantalizing in this lost film about sexual jealousy are the radiant images of the young Romy Schneider, undeniable muse of Clouzot’s dream. A “dazzling evocation of what may be one of the greatest films never made” – Catherine Wheatley, Sight & Sound.

CCSU

11/18
Eat Pray Love
@ Philbrick Camp
10 p.m./free

A woman who once made it her goal in life to marry and rear a family finds her priorities suddenly shifting in Ryan Murphy andJennifer Salt’s adaptation of author Elizabeth Gilbert’s best-selling memoir. In the eyes of many, Liz Gilbert (Julia Roberts) was a woman who had it all — a loving husband, a great career, and a weekend home — but sometimes one realizes too little too late that they haven’t gotten what they truly wanted from life. On the heels of a painful divorce, the woman who had previously looked forward to a contented life of domestic bliss sets out to seek her true destiny by traveling first to Italy, where she learns to appreciate nourishment; then to India, where she discovers the power of prayer; and finally to Bali, where she unexpectedly finds the meaning of true love. – Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide

11/19
All the Presidents Men
@ Torp Theatre
2pm (opening reception at 1:30 pm)/free

As part of CCSU’s Classic Fridays Film Series, Professor Gil Gigliotti presents this true to life conspiracy classic from the 1970s. Tony Canella, associate professor of Journalism, will be presenting notes on the film.

Conspiracy film specialist Alan J. Pakula turned journalists Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s best-selling account of their Watergate investigation into one of the hit films of Bicentennial year 1976. While researching a story about a botched 1972 burglary of Democratic Party headquarters at the Watergate apartment complex, green Washington Post reporters/rivals Woodward (Robert Redford, who also exec produced) and Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) stumble on a possible connection between the burglars and a White House staffer. With the circumspect approval of executive editor Ben Bradlee (Jason Robards), the pair digs deeper. Aided by a guilt-ridden turncoat bookkeeper (Jane Alexander) and the vital if cryptic guidance of Woodward’s mystery source, Deep Throat (Hal Holbrook), Woodward and Bernstein “follow the money” all the way to the top of the Nixon administration. Despite Deep Throat’s warnings that their lives are in danger, and the reluctance of older Post editors, Woodward and Bernstein are determined to get out the story of the crime and its presidential cover-up. Once Bradlee is convinced, the final teletype impassively taps out the historically explosive results. – Lucia Bozzola, All Movie Guide

Calendar 11/10-11/17

MUSIC

11/10
The Morning Benders/Twin Sister
@ Iron Horse Music Hall
Northampton, MA
$12.50 adv./8:30 p.m.

11/12
D.R.I (Dirty Rotten Imbeciles)
@ The Webster
Hartford, CT
$15 adv./6:30 p.m. doors

11/13
The McLovins
@ Hoops & Hops
Simsbury, CT
21+ only

11/15
The Chariot
@ The Webster
Hartford, CT
$10 adv./6 p.m. doors

11/16
nevershoutnever/The Maine
@ The Webster
Hartford, CT
$17.50 adv./6 p.m. doors

11/17
Allstar Weekend
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$15 adv./5 p.m. doors

FILM

11/12 & 11/13
The Room
@ Bow Tie Cinema Palace Theatre
Hartford, CT
$10/11:30 p.m.

The Room is an electrifying American black comedy about love, passion, betrayal and lies. It has five major characters, Johnny, played by Tommy Wiseau is a successful banker with great respect for an dedication to the people in his life, especially his future wife Lisa. Johnny can also be a little too trusting at times which haunts him later on. Lisa, played by Juliette Danielle, is the beautiful blond fiance of Johnny. She has always gotten her way and will manipulate to get what she wants. She is a taker, with a double personality, and her deadly schemes lead to her own downfall. Mark, played by Greg Sestero, is a young, successful and independent best friend of Johnny. He has a good heart, but gets caught up in Lisa’s dangerous web and gives in to temptation. This eventually brings him to great loss. Claudette, played by Carolyn Minnott, is the classy, sophisticated mother of Lisa who has had disappointing relationships in her life. She wants her daughter to be married as soon as possible so she can benefit. Denny, played by Philip Haldiman, is an orphan boy, naive and confused about life, love, and friendship. Denny is a very ambitions and also very grateful tot he people who are in his life. The Room depicts the depths of friendships and relationships in one life and raises life’s real and most asked question: “Can you ever really trust anyone? Enter The Room and leave forever changed!

11/15 & 11/16
Howl
@ Cinestudio (Trinity College)
Hartford, CT
$8/7:30 p.m.

Straight from Trinity’s Eros Film Festival, a hugely entertaining movie on how one poem crystallized the Beat generation’s yearning for freedom in art, life, and the choice of sexual partners. James Franco gives an Oscar®-worthy performance as the young Allen Ginsberg, acting from a script based on actual interviews, transcripts of the poem’s 1957 court trial for obscenity, and lines from the incendiary Howl. The courtroom scenes are amazing, as a San Francisco prosecutor (David Strathairn) battles the defense attorney (Jon Hamm) to have it banned from publication. The proceedings veer from the absurd to the passionate, as a parade of ‘expert’ witnesses take part in one of the seminal contests of art vs. fear. “Howl does something that sounds simple until you consider how rarely it occurs…It takes a familiar, celebrated piece of writing and makes it come alive.” – A. O. Scott, New York Times

11/17
Never Let You Go
@ Cinemastudio (Trinity College)
Hartford, CT
$8/7:30 p.m.

Carey Mulligan and Keira Knightley, who last acted together in Pride & Prejudice, join Andrew Garfield (The Social Network) in the haunting new movie based on the 2005 novel by Kazuo Ishiguro. In Hailsham, a British boarding school that is the very opposite of Hogwarts, the innocent friendship of three students played by Mulligan, Garfield and Knightley is torn from within by a shifting love triangle, and without by expectations of the adult world they do not understand. Part coming of age story, part romance, and part sci-fi horror, Never Let Me Go is also a haunting allegory on the damage that adults can (and do) inflict on the younger generation. “a moving and provocative film that initially unsettles, then disturbs and finally haunts you well into the night.” – Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

CCSU Events
11/11
Dinner for Schmucks
@ Philbrick Camp
FREE/10 p.m.

When he finds out that his work superiors host a dinner celebrating the idiocy of their guests, a rising executive questions it when he’s invited, just as he befriends a man who would be the perfect guest. -IMDb

11/14 & 11/15
Eat Pray Love
@ Torp (14th), Semesters (15th)
FREE/7 p.m.

A married woman realizes how unhappy her marriage really is, and that her life needs to go in a different direction. After a painful divorce, she takes off on a round-the-world journey to “find herself”. -IMDb

11/16
John Taglier
@ Semesters
FREE/7 p.m.

Calendar 11/4-11/11

MUSIC

11/4
Atreyu
w/Blessthefall
@ Webster Theatre
Hartford, CT
$20 adv./6 p.m. doors

Living Colour
Foxwoods
Mashantucket, CT

11/5
Matt & Kim
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$16 adv./8 p.m. doors

11/6
All That Remains
@ Webster Theatre
Hartford, CT
$20 adv./7 p.m. doors

Four Year Strong
w/The Wonder Years
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$15/5 p.m. doors

11/8
Arsonists Get All The Girls
w/Ion Dissonance
@ Heirloom Arts Theatre
Danbury, CT
$12 adv./5 p.m. doors

11/10
Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience
@ The Palace Theater
Stamford, CT
$36/7:30 p.m.

11/11
Arlo Guthrie
@ Infinity Music Hall and Bistro
Norfolk, CT
$75/8 p.m.

FILM

11/4
The Agony and Ecstasy of Phil Spector
@ Real Art Ways
Hartford, CT
$6.25/7 p.m.

Phil Spector is a pioneer of American music, a legendary producer to John Lennon and Tina Turner, and, as of April 13th 2009, a convicted murderer. Yet the Spector who appears in Vikram Jayanti’s documentary is not the severe, outlandishly coiffed defendant seen in sensationalistic accounts of his trial, but a charming, savvy music executive with a generous, but arguably accurate, estimation of his place in the history of popular music. -Hamptons International Film Festival

11/5 & 11/6
Fight Club
@ Bow Tie Palace Theatre
Hartford, CT
$10/11:30 p.m.

An office employee and a soap salesman build a global organization to help vent male aggression. -IMDb

11/7-11/9
Life During Wartime
@ Trinity College (Cinestudio)
Hartford, CT
$8/7:30 p.m.

Friends, family, and lovers struggle to find love, forgiveness, and meaning in a war-torn world riddled with comedy and pathos. -IMDb

CCSU MOVIES

11/4
Twilight: Eclipse
@ Philbrick Campus
Free/10 p.m.

As a string of mysterious killings grips Seattle, Bella, whose high school graduation is fast approaching, is forced to choose between her love for vampire Edward and her friendship with werewolf Jacob. -IMDb

11/11
Dinner for Schmucks
@ Philbrick Campus
Free/10 p.m.

When he finds out that his work superiors host a dinner celebrating the idiocy of their guests, a rising executive questions it when he’s invited, just as he befriends a man who would be the perfect guest. -IMDb

Calendar 10/27 – 11/3

MUSIC

10/28
OK Go
@ Webster
Hartford, CT
$16/7 p.m.

State Radio
@ Iron Horse
Northampton, MA
$28/10 p.m.

Indigo Girls
@ Toads Place
New Haven, CT
$40/8:30 p.m.

A Sunny Day in Glasgow
@ Toad’s Place (Lilly’s Pad)
New Haven, CT
$10/8 p.m.

10/30
Hey Monday
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$15/5:30 p.m.

10/31
Devin Townsend Project
@ Webster
Hartford, CT
$15/7 p.m.

11/1
Hellshock/Age/Attentat
@ Whitney House
Hartford, CT
$5/7 p.m.

Every Time I Die
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$15/7 p.m.

11/3
Lucero
@ Toad’s Place
New Haven, CT
$18/8:30 p.m.

The Cult
@ Webster
Hartford, CT
$27/7 p.m.

FILM

10/29
The Shining
@ Cinestudio
Hartford, CT
$8/9:30 p.m.

Your trick-or-treating days may be over, but that’s no reason to miss out on a chance to be scared out of your pants! One of the terrifying movies ever made comes to the big screen for one night only. You won’t want to go home alone after seeing the beyond-creepy implosion of a “typical” American family. Jack Nicholson is at his sharpest as a writer who spirits his family away to act as caretaker for the mysterious Overlook Hotel, where horror and ‘redrum’ wait behind every door – Directed by the great Stanley Kubrick (Dr. Strangelove, 2001; A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange), there’s sly humor to go along with the suspense. Just remember, “All work and no fun make Jack a dull boy” 119 min

10/30
Metropolis (with live music by the Alloy Orchestra)
@ Real Art Ways
Hartford, CT
$20/$25/8 p.m.

The Alloy Orchestra accompany the fully restored version ofMetropolis, the Fritz Lang classic dystopian epic.

25 additional minutes of footage, once thought forever lost, were discovered in Buenos Aires in 2008. Now newly restored, Metropolis is being screened in its complete form for the first time since its 1927 premiere in Berlin.

Roger Ebert calls the Alloy Orchestra “the best in the world at accompanying silent films.” The three-man ensemble work with an outrageous assemblage of peculiar objects.

The group is composed of Terry Donahue (junk, accordion, musical saw, vocals), Ken Winokur (director, junk percussion and clarinet), and Roger Miller (keyboards). They have composed scores for nearly 30 silent films.

10/31 – 1/3
Breathless (50th Anniversary Restoration)
@ Cinestudio
Hartford, CT

Jean-Luc Godard’s tribute to (or post-modern commentary on) American gangster movies is the perfect example of the revolutionary attack on studio filmmaking that defined France’s New Wave. Jean Seberg plays a young American student selling the Herald Tribune on the Champs-Elysee, who catches the eye of a small time thief: a star-making performance by the impossibly cool Jean-Paul Belmondo. Played out on the streets, cars, and apartments of Paris, it is not always easy to see where passion ends, and danger begins. In 1961, famously cranky New York Times critic Bosley Crowther called Breathless “sordid” and “completely devoid of moral tone.” Some fifty years later, Roger Ebert said of Godard’s masterpiece – which was based on a story by Francois Truffaut – “Modern movies began here.” 90 min.

Calendar 10/20 – 10/27

THEATRE

10/19 – 10/23
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
@ CCSU Maloney Hall Black Box Theatre
New Britain, CT
Free/7:30 p.m.

MUSIC

10/20
Senses Fail/Bayside
@ Webster Theatre
Hartford, CT
$15/6:30 p.m.

10/22
Insane Clown Posse
@ Webster Theatre
Hartford, CT
$26/7 p.m.

Cute Is What We Aim For
@ Webster Underground
Hartford, CT
$12/6:30 p.m.

The Books
@ Pearl Street
Northampton, MA
$20/9 p.m.

Hostage Calm Halloween Show
@ West Haven American Legion
$8 (with costume)/6:30 p.m.

10/23
Tech N9ne
@ Webster Theatre
Hartford, CT
$26/7 p.m.

10/24
The Corin Tucker Band
@ Pearl Street
Northampton. MA
$18/8:30 p.m.

FILM

10/20 – 10/23
The American
@ Trinity College
Hartford, CT
$8/7:30 p.m.

It’s always a pleasure to be able to re-introduce movies that were marketed (and usually failed) as Hollywood action films, but belonged in art theaters all along. The American is more Sergio Leone/Antonioni than Salt, and George Clooney shows intriguing depth as a killer-for-hire with poise, intelligence, and an existential froideur. After learning that he has been set up by a shadowy enemy, he hides out in a gorgeous mountain village east of Rome. But even friendship and an intensely erotic affair cannot shake his sense of impending danger. Anton Corijn, who made the moody biopic of Joy Division’s Ian Curtis (Control), cinematographer Martin Ruhe, and composer Herbert Gronemeyer combine to make the panoramic landscape an equal character in the drama – especially when experienced on Cinestudio’s wide screen. 105 min.

10/24 – 10/25
The Phantom of Liberty
@ Trinity College
Hartford, CT
$8/7:30 p.m.

The penultimate film of the great surrealist director Luis Bunuel (Viridiana, Belle de Jour, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie) returns to a subject that fascinated the 74-year-old artist all his life: the randomness, terror, and unexpected beauty of pure chance. The series of interlocking vignettes express Bunuel’s ridicule of convention and a hilarious sense of the absurd. In one scene, a little girl is reported missing by her parents to the police, even though she stands in the room, unseen; in another, wealthy guests sit around a table on toilets, only to excuse themselves to go into private cubicles to eat. “For my part, I see liberty as a ghost that we try to grasp. . . and we embrace a misty shape that leaves us with only a wisp of vapor in our hands.” – Luis Bunuel.

10/22 – 10/23
Jaws
@ Criterion Cinemas
New Haven, CT
$5/11:30 p.m.

Based on Peter Benchley’s best-selling novel, Steven Spielberg’s 1975 shark saga set the standard for the New Hollywood popcorn blockbuster while frightening millions of moviegoers out of the water. One early summer night on fictional Atlantic resort Amity Island, Chrissie decides to take a moonlight skinny dip while her friends party on the beach. Yanked suddenly below the ocean surface, she never returns. When pieces of her wash ashore, Police Chief Brody (Roy Scheider) suspects the worst, but Mayor Vaughn (Murray Hamilton), mindful of the lucrative tourist trade and the approaching July 4th holiday, refuses to put the island on a business-killing shark alert. After the shark dines on a few more victims, the Mayor orders the local fishermen to catch the culprit. Satisfied with the shark they find, the greedy Mayor reopens the beaches, despite the warning from visiting ichthyologist Hooper (Richard Dreyfuss) that the attacks were probably caused by a far more formidable Great White. One more fatality later, Brody and Hooper join forces with flinty old salt Quint (Robert Shaw), the only local fisherman willing to take on a Great White–especially since the price is right. The three ride off on Quint’s boat “The Orca,” soon coming face to teeth with the enemy. ~ Lucia Bozzola, All Movie Guide

Army of Darkness
@ Bowtie Cinemas
Hartford, CT
$5/11:30 p.m.

The third in director Sam Raimi’s stylish, comic book-like horror trilogy that began with The Evil Dead (1982), this tongue-in-cheek sequel offers equal parts sword-and-sorcery-style action, gore, and comedy. Bruce Campbell returns as the one-armed Ash, now a supermarket employee (“Shop Smart…Shop S-Mart”) who is transported by the powers of a mysterious book back in time with his Oldsmobile ’88 to the 14th century medieval era. Armed only with a shotgun, his high school chemistry textbook, and a chainsaw that mounts where his missing appendage once resided, the square-jawed, brutally competent Ash quickly establishes himself as a besieged kingdom’s best hope against an “army of darkness” currently plaguing the land. Since the skeleton warriors have been resurrected with the aid of the Necronomicon (the same tome that can send Ash back to his own time) he agrees to face the enemy in battle. Ash also finds romance of a sort along the way with a beautiful damsel in distress, Sheila (Embeth Davidtz), and contends with his own doppelganger after mangling an important incantation. ~ Karl Williams, All Movie Guide