CCSU Students React to United Airlines Incident

by Sarah Willson

United Airlines is set to testify at an upcoming United States House Transportation Committee hearing after a passenger was dragged off an overbooked flight on April 9, in order to make room for crew members.

According to CNN, the 69-year-old passenger, Dr. David Dao, who was forcefully removed from the aircraft, is filing a lawsuit after suffering a concussion, broken nose and the loss of two front teeth, said his attorney.

The airline, which is facing severe backlash from the public, was quick to apologize to Dao, saying they “continue to express [their] sincerest apology to Dr. Dao,” and “cannot stress enough that [they] remain steadfast in [their] commitment to make [the situation] right,” according to an article published by CNN on April 10.

The airline made a claim on April 18 saying no one will be fired after the incident.

Despite the apology, fellow passengers on the flight were still upset by the violent turn of events.

“Had they just tried some diplomacy, none of this would have taken place,” said one man who was on the flight when the incident occurred.

One passenger tweeted at United, saying they had “no words” for the “poor man.”

CCSU students were also outraged after the violent removal.

“I was very shocked to hear how they handled it. After seeing the video, I felt nothing but sympathy for the doctor,” said computer science major Justin Wanciak. “I find it despicable that people could just sit around while that happened to him.”

Moryam Badiru, a junior majoring in social work, agreed.

“I thought it was just horrible”, said Badiru. “He paid for a ticket to go somewhere and he just got dragged off, bleeding on the airline.”

“Nobody’s going to want to fly with them,” said Badiru, referring to United Airlines.

When asked about how the airline could have better handled the situation, Badiru said the problem could have been solved by avoiding overbooked flights.

“If a flight is overbooked, they shouldn’t still be selling tickets and seats,” said Badiru.

At the very least, Badiru believed that the overbooked passengers should be put on the next flight out to their destination.

Although agreeing that overbooking was the issue, Wanciak had a slightly different approach as to how United could have better handled what happened.

“De-escalation training should be essential for officers or security as a first line of protection. If an individual can be coerced to calm down or comply, it resolves the situation before conflict,” said Wanciak. “Sure, they offer money as compensation, but some things are more important than that.”

“Dr. Dao should not have automatically been forced off, and should not have been manhandled to the point where he had been bloodied,” said Wanciak. “Understandably, people are going to be really angry when they are thrown off a plane they paid for, so why not have better contingencies for it?”

More than anything, both students agree that United Airlines is in the wrong.

“It makes no sense,” said Badiru. “Who does that?”

“United Airlines is without a doubt in the wrong with this one,” said Wanciak. “There are so many other techniques that people can employ to try and convince people to give up their seats.”

The date has not been set for the upcoming U.S. House Transportation Committee hearing.

The airline has made no further comments on the incident.

2017-2018 SGA Senators: What Do You Plan To Accomplish Next Year?

by Angela Fortuna

At-Large Senators:

Victor Constanza: “I want to keep my promises in what I said when I was running. First, I want the “Paper-Boy Initiative” to be passed. This will create a personal connection to students when we give out information about events and what is going on with the school. This will require senators to actually go into public and go up to students one-on-one. Second, I would like to reform the liaison program. We have to actually go to club meetings, so the SGA knows what these clubs are about, what they are doing exactly, and help them with whatever they need. Lastly, we need to improve upon community engagement. We have to participate with all clubs to help the students of New Britain, since the town does not have a high graduation rate. We should take it upon ourselves to help.”

Stephen Dew: “My re-election to senate will focus on three focal points. First, we must join with the other schools in the CSCU system to coordinate our efforts to challenge the state legislature and system office when it comes to tuition [and] fees. Second, we must introduce a student alternative to the bookstore, to help lower the cost of textbooks. And third, we must really do more to lower the barriers to club funding, to give every organization and student the best possible chance to succeed and meet their potential.”

Damar Britto: “For those who don’t know, I have a four-point platform, dubbed the STAR Platform. It stands for scholarships, tuition grants (for undocumented students), active senate and finally relationships with organizations. I plan to have these ideas pushed, especially scholarships and tuition grants, by becoming the chair of the Student Life Committee within the SGA, as one of its focuses is scholarships.”

Jailene Nazario: “Next year, I want to keep a strong relationship with students and faculty, so I can focus on open resource textbooks and on the issues that students come to me with.”

Joseph Carangui: “I am delighted to be representing the student body at CCSU once again. I believe I got re-elected because my platform connected with students. Therefore, I intend to make the positive impact that I campaigned for, which is to continue to have this organization host wellness events and increase the amount of money in SGA scholarships that [are] available to all undergraduate students.”

Brianna Rose: “I plan to raise awareness of the barriers CCSU students face while trying to attain an education to better their quality of life. Research shows that most colleges are unequipped to service vulnerable students. This is a deterrent in the college success of students who come from difficult backgrounds such as first-generations, immigrants, foster care or homelessness. As a senator, I will use my power to be an advocate for myself and others like me, whose pathway to college was not simply just a journey, but a fight.”

Flavja Muka: “I am excited to represent the student body as a new voice on the senate. I plan to encourage students to become more involved in the SGA and CCSU community. It is important to have each student feel heard and empowered. Therefore, I plan to have a positive connection with the clubs and organizations on campus. I believe the senate can make a powerful impact on student life, so I will do my best to represent all students.”

Jessica Aguilar: “I’m very thankful to have received the opportunity to represent the student body at CCSU. As an SGA member, I want to create better communication between students and organizations on campus. Also, I’ll strive to have an open mind in students’ concerns and ensure that students’ needs are met on campus.”

Resident Senators:

Amanda Gorman: “I am excited to be serving the students for another year. I plan to assist in changing scholarships to make them more accessible and larger in both quantity and quality.”

John Coleman: “My plan for this coming year is to work with the Academic Affairs Committee to provide a high-quality educational experience to all CCSU students. The one thing that all students have in common is education, so addressing academic issues benefits everyone. In particular, I’d like to address two issues: college affordability and the advising process. I want the senate to be strong advocates and earn the trust of the student body.”

Kelly Hernandez: “One of my main goals is to be a voice to cultural-based clubs as well as other clubs on campus that are often overlooked. As a member of [the] Latin American Student Organization, the Ebony Chorale Ensemble and a host of other clubs, I know what issues seem to hurt clubs across the board and I wish to stop it. Another goal of mine is to help represent student athletes. The student athlete population is another group that is severely underrepresented in student government and I hope to change that.”

Akai Long: “As a senator of the Student Government Association, I plan to create a better connected campus. To create a better connected campus, I have come up with a two-part plan: the first part is to better connect the SGA with state and local governments. As is stands, the SGA has put the minimum amount of effort to advocate on behalf of students. The second part is better connecting the SGA to CCSU students. I plan to go to as many hall councils as I can because as a resident senator, I want to hear as much feedback from residents as I can.”

James Angelopoulos: “My mission is to improve the environment of the university. If we can improve the environment and culture to show off the talented and big members of our campus, I believe we can get more students to come to CCSU and slow down the tuition growth. I also want the hard-working clubs on campus, who make a point of getting involved, to receive more funding to promote a stronger environment on campus.”

Jacquelyn Daniels: “As resident senator, I will encourage more communication between the student body and the SGA, so that every student receives the representation they deserve. I plan to collaborate with clubs and organizations to increase involvement and promote more events. I also hope to extend dining hall hours through a petition, if students continue to express interest in this plan. I will advocate for the SGA to increase scholarship funding, to give more students greater chances and a wider variety of scholarships.”

Thomas Mitchell: I ran for the SGA to do one simple thing: finish what I have started. In order to do such, it is my mission to acquire a golf cart for the student government in order to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of events on campus. Many initiatives can come from this golf cart, such as the SGA Designated Driver as well as the SGA Meals on Wheels. Aside from that, I want to promote an open source textbook platform as well as advancing the academic technologies within majors to create a generation of future experts coming from CCSU.”

Jared Sales: “While on SGA, I want to make sure that all resident senators are going to their hall councils at least once a month and asking their constituents what they want SGA to do for them. Personally, with senator Akai Long and any other senators who join me in the future, will go to every hall council at least once a month. I will join the Student Life Committee and dedicate myself to working on mental health and other aspects of the committee.”

Commuter Senators:

Dajana Sejdiraj: “I want us, as SGA individuals, to work with different clubs and to create amazing things on campus that can benefit everyone. For example, I would want to work with all the science- and technology-related clubs to create a single solar panel umbrella that students can use to charge their laptops and study outside. I would want to start with just one and see how successful it would become before expanding upon it. I want to work with the LGBTQ [community] and create gender-neutral bathrooms on campus. I want to work with CAN and create fun promo items such as free ponchos for everyone to use on a rainy day when walking to classes.”

Sedina Begic: “A few of the things I plan on doing next year as a senator are to implement Wellness Week in the fall, since one is already in the spring. Also, themed months to increase the wellness of students as well as getting the SGA’s name out there. I would like to invest in a career closet. If it’s approved, we can rent out a small area somewhere in the library or student center and provide business casual attire for students who may need to rent it in cases of job interviews or internships, etc. One final thing I plan on doing is just being more accessible to anyone with questions through text, email and in-person meetings.”

Gabriella Bierwirth: “This upcoming year, I have a lot of goals that I would like to accomplish with the SGA. Besides simply making sure that senators get more involved with clubs and their events, I want to try and host more awareness weeks and activities in which different cultures, religions, ethnicities and clubs can host games and activities to raise awareness of who they are as well as address micro-aggressions. I want to eliminate a lot of the tension seen within the SGA and ensure that we are working together as a group to help as many people as we can. I especially want to increase involvement within the entire campus and build a stronger connection with the rest of New Britain.”

Estefania Maya: “Next year, I want to create stronger relationships with the clubs and students. I hope to support the other committees on senate and the new e-board with their future endeavors and by volunteering my time, planning events and communicating with students. I strongly believe that, in order to better represent the students, we must know what issues they face, whether that be funding or academic struggles. This can only be done if we take time to check up on the clubs and students.”

Kassandra Fruin: “I want to help provide our campus with more accessibility to all students, a better sense of campus community and advocate for affordability. My own challenging life experiences have given me a strong desire to want to give back. I pride myself on advocating for a more inclusive and welcoming campus. Identifying with the LGBTQ community, I understand the fear of safety on campus, in our community and country as a whole. I will fight for a strong stand on social justice issues and fight for a safer campus. The Student Government needs to be proactive in ending the stigmas related to mental health and help aid our students into the right direction when it comes to proper funding. Along with accessibility, the cost of attending CCSU is a huge issue that needs to be addressed. We are experiencing a time that tuition is going up four percent and we need student leaders to advocate for an affordable education. I will provide the guidance and experience as a returning senator the SGA needs to be of larger benefit to students.”

Dante Solano: “By the end of the next semester, I look forward to the implementation of an SGA climate survey.  This survey will give students the opportunity to grade the work of the SGA along with making their voices and concerns heard. I await the opportunity to make sure that we, here in the SGA, fund clubs and organizations in both a fair and responsible fashion. I hope to soon meet with some of our administration to discuss the safety of students during the winter and campus policies for emergency weather situations.”

Christopher Theriault: Unreachable for comment at this time.

Jose Diaz: Unreachable for comment at this time.

Sawera Hussan: “I’m honored to be re-elected as a senator for the SGA to continue representing the student body. My initiatives are to increase club funding, advocate for affordable higher education and provide a safe and inclusive environment for everyone at CCSU.”

Sabrina Morin: “I am very pleased to be a re-elected senator here at CCSU.  As a senator next semester, I am hoping to bring better communication to campus, end stigmas and spread mental health awareness as well as resources here on campus.”

Tiffany Aguilera: “I ran for senate this year to hear the voices of students and to make this campus a more inclusive community, especially for those who have disabilities. I have noticed that students, especially those who have disabilities, don’t participate as much in club activities or events that occur on campus. I would like to change that by working closely with Student Disability Services, the Wellness Center and the Women’s Center. Although details aren’t fully worked out yet, I would like [to express] that I plan to dedicate myself to this and to make it my mission for the next academic year.”

Jalal Butt: “I plan to help steer the academic affairs committee in the path it has been directed to over these past two years. This involves the facilitation of CCSU course transitions to open-source resources, expansion of the plan to increase course transparency through online syllabi and an increase in academic mapping reliability.”

Mariano Cardoso: Unreachable for comment at this time.

Natalia Rozio: “I am extremely excited to represent commuter students on campus and be a part of SGA. Next year, I hope to connect SGA with the Transfer Office to make the transferring process for future students smoother and less frustrating. I also plan to make commuters feel more comfortable on campus by introducing commuter-based events throughout the semester.”

A Fresh Approach: Exploring Art In Teacher Preparation

DR. Clark and Dr. French’s diversity leadership course with CCSU leader candidates on the university campus.

by Courtney Leblanc

In a bright room, abstract art is plastered on the walls and scrapbooks and gifts from past students lay scattered along the window sill. Photos fixed to the walls showcase teacher candidates and their participation in the arts, while student-made masks captivate all who enter the unconventional workplace.

The atmosphere of Dr. Barbara Clark’s office reveals her dedication and love of teaching. On March 22, her lifelong hard work had paid off. Clark was notified that she had been chosen as the recipient of The Board of Regents Teaching Award. As an alumnus and professor of 12 years at Central Connecticut State University, Clark was humbled to receive the honor.

“I was really surprised because the chances of getting something like this are, you know, I would say pretty slim because there are so many great professors at CCSU,” said Clark.

The award is given to outstanding faculty who distinguish themselves and have promoted improvements to their educational programs. With that said, Clark has proven that her appreciation of the arts and its integration in education has had an everlasting impact on many.

In Clark’s early years, she had a dream to become an artist and live a romantic life in the city. However, when Clark’s parents suggested that she get into the education field, she respected their opinion. She found that she can take her love for the arts and transform the classroom environment.

“I consider what I create in schools a form of conceptual art,” said Clark. “I created programs for schools to teach the adults how you can change a school environment to improve community, behaviors and friendships.”

As a young teacher, Clark worked in a variety of school districts. She noticed the vast differences between urban and suburban communities.

As a result, she wanted to show that unique and cutting-edge programs can potentially inspire students who are below grade level.

In using her skills and strategies, she is determined to show teacher candidates what they can achieve as an innovative teacher.

“Dr. Clark has had a tremendous impact on the way I practice teaching,” said Allison Tuohy, one of Clark’s past students. “I am currently teaching kindergarten and I often incorporate things I’ve learned from my prior professor. I use music and art to teach my English language learners. I try to unmask the possibilities for each and every student.”

Clark’s pursuit to educate future teachers does not end here. She hopes to further her career by training in-service educators as well.

“I have this dream of having a program for teachers where they would find their imaginative voice and their creative spirit,” said Clark. “Then they would be more likely to know how to use those methods with children.”

As a piece of advice for future teachers, Clark tells her students not to settle for the status quo. She urges them not to simply work out of the curriculum book, but to use ideas that truly inspire them.

With the help of her co-worker, Dr. James French, Clark wrote a book titled, “Hearts and Mind Without Fear: Unmasking the Sacred in Teacher Preparation,” in hopes of extending the teachings of her research to future educators.

As Clark says in her book, “teachers must know how to be social- and eco-justice advocates that teach children love and respect so that they are truly peacemakers as they move throughout their lives.”

Meet The A Capella Society: Fermata The Blue

 

Fermata the Blue’s first EP is now on iTunes and Spotify

by Jacob Carey

Fermata the Blue is an all-male A Capella group on Central Connecticut State University’s campus. They are a group of fun loving guys who enjoy to sing.

They are founded on the belief of brotherhood, as Tevin Jourdain, the group’s Assistant Director said, “we have a sense of comradery.” He further explained how an older brother can make fun of their siblings, but when someone else tries to, the older brother stops it, specifically what is to be expected from this group.

They are a very close group of guys that joke around with one another, while being there for each other as well. This fosters an environment that inspires creativity within the group, as no one feels that they are going to be judged. This allows the group as a whole to push the limits on what they do, and always attempt to try new things that will “wow” their audience.

Even though these guys love to goof off, when it comes time to perform, they know how to put on a show. They frequently start off their concerts with a comedic video created by the members of the group. On top of that, their music is well performed and hits an emotional core. They do an excellent job of picking an array of songs that displays their vast talent, while also taking their audience on a journey. On top of that, they are very particular about who they would like to arrange a piece, as they want to make sure the song gets proper treatment. They often will pick very popular tunes that pulls their audience in. Once they have control of their audience, they sing an incredibly emotional song that brings people to tears. They are not afraid to show their emotional side, which audiences love.

Looking to the future, they are excited to grow as a group by continuing to attend Boston Sings (BOSS), and possibly competing at the ICCA’s again. Additionally, they are looking to compete more in general. They hope to continue to get exposure so they can get feedback as a group, using those critiques and applying it to develop their sound. This is an important technique that they use to make sure that the group keeps a fresh sound, and to make sure that they continue to put on high quality shows.

The “Boys in Blue” recently released their first EP on iTunes and Spotify. They are currently trying to raise the money to record and release another EP in the future. Make sure to check out their EP, as well as follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

Their next concert is Monday, Apr. 24 at 7:30 p.m. in Torp Theater. If you cannot make the concert or just want to hear more, you can also check them out on YouTube. If you are interested in auditioning, feel free to contact them, or go to the A Capella Society’s “Welcome Back Concert” in the Fall, and check out all the groups on campus and sign up for auditions.

Beecher Hall Presents 7th Annual Condom Carnival

by Matt Balogh

Catharine Beecher Hall is one of nine residence halls on Central Connecticut State University’s campus. Among the smallest of the buildings, it functions as co-ed housing for both upper and lower classmen. In the “down-the-hill” section of the campus, Beecher is the only co-ed residence hall that does not require an addition charge to housing, and is open to all grade levels.

Started in 2010, both the E-board and Beecher residents came up with a program to promote the practice of safe sex and the use of contraceptives, known as the Condom Carnival. The event primarily focuses on spreading a message of usage of condoms and the prevention of STDs.

Seven years later, the Beecher Hall E-board has brought back the idea to continue the annual event last Wednesday. “Along with continuing the tradition, this event is crucial for education on practicing safe sex, something that many college students may not know much about,” says Brian Ngork, Vice President of Beecher Hall. “People have enjoyed the program every year, and it’s always a great thing to see,” Ngork continued.

This year, both the RAs and E-board of Beecher Hall have set up many booths and games on Vance Lawn to go along with the theme. Beecher had reached out to other halls at the Inter-Residence Council (IRC) meeting, to which Sam May and Seth North Hall agreed to participate in.

Games were assembled to teach facts about STDs and contraceptives, such as a dart game in which the dart represents your chances when having sex of contracting an STD. If the dart hits a balloon with a specific color of beads in it, the colors correspond with a certain STD that you have a risk of getting.

With an attendance of over 350 people each year, Vance Lawn gets packed full of students playing games. Each booth provides the participant with a red ticket, various prizes, and condoms, of course. Once each person gets three tickets, they were allowed to get a free Condom Carnival shirt from the booth. Outside booths, such as participants from the ASAP Center, provided blue tickets for students to get free food with.

The event even included live music, as well as music provided by the campus radio station, WFCS. A cappella groups Fermata the Blue and Chromachord performed, along with rapper T-Hurt and Indie Rock band Static Charmer. The inclusion of live music helped attract people that happened to be walking by between classes, offering a wide variety of music so everyone could find something to enjoy.

“The Condom Carnival is a perfect way to interact with people from all parts of campus,” Beecher Secretary Sean Tarascio mentioned. “It is a real eye-opener to something that is usually considered a touchy subject.”

Fortunately, the bad weather had held off until the very end of the program. Compared to past Condom Carnivals, this one had been less windy, but also a lot less sunny. No news yet on if Beecher Hall plans on continuing the carnival for next year, but there is a strong possibility that the tradition will live on.

Third Annual ALS Walk At CCSU

 

Doug Somers (third in from the left) is presented with the John F. Rice Jr Award inside the Quad

by Corey O’Neill

On Sunday April 23, the third Annual ALS Walk was held at Central Connecticut State University. Co-hosted by Phi Delta Theta CT Alpha Chapter and Student Government Association , the event yet again had another great turnout.

“The turnout was amazing,” said Phi Delta Theta brother Fares Hashem. “I’m proud of everyone for coming out. We worked hard together to make this event successful.”

This year’s award was named the “John J. Rice, JR. Award,” after a CCSU Alumni and New Britain resident who passed away due to ALS in 2014.

Rice’s widow, Diane Dalenta-Rice presented the award to Doug Somers, whose business CT Building and Restoration, gave a $250 donation, the largest of the day.

An opening and closing ceremony for the event took place in the Quad of CCSU. There were many food booths at the ceremony, while the walk participants were able to partake in games and activities.

A $20 minimum donation was asked for to participate in the walk, and those who donated $75 or more were given an ALS Walk t-shirt.

“ALS is such a devastating disease that affects millions of people worldwide,” said Phi Delta Theta brother Gabriel Ramos. “Raising awareness is the least my brothers and I could do in our effort to address this issue.”

Members of the Phi Delta Theta and SGA participate in this year’s ALS Walk

According to Jacob Vincent Goulas, a brother of Phi Delta Theta and SGA Senator, it was very important to the chapter to get an ALS awareness walk to CCSU.

“We as a chapter in the past would go to ALS walks around Connecticut and show support. Then, our chapter noticed that our local community included people who had ALS or had even died from ALS,” said Goulas. “We started the walk over three years ago, and now we carry the torch each year. This walk is growing and has been gaining more attention over the years.”

The first ALS Walk at CCSU took place on April 18, 2015. The walk has been a success each year since. For this year’s walk, Phi Delta Theta set a goal of raising $4,000. This goal was easily reached, with $5,266 being collected in donations.

Phi Delta Theta is already planning on how to make next year’s walk even bigger and better. “We need to spread the word more,” said Ramos. “We get a lot of support from a number of local businesses already, but expanding our reach is the best way to make our walk better.”

ALS is commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease. 15 people on average are diagnosed with ALS every day, and there is still no cure for the disease.

Made famous by legendary New York Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig, he brought attention to the disease in his iconic 1939 “Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth” retirement speech. Gehrig was a member of Phi Delta Theta. The chapter honors Gehrig by choosing the ALS Association as their national philanthropy.

All proceeds from this year’s ALS Walk, as well as all future walks, will go to the ALS Association. The proceeds will be benefiting those who suffer from this terrible neurological disease.

For more information on how to help in the fight against ALS, please visit the ALS Association’s official website, http://www.alsa.org.

Blue Devil Baseball Sweeps Weekend Series

by Kyle Flynn

The Central Connecticut State University men’s baseball team, came into this weekends series against Mount Saint Mary’s with a record of 16-13.

Mount Saint Mary’s, who sat at 4-22 coming into this series, got behind pretty early to starting pitcher Brendan Smith, and the rest of the Blue Devils. TT Bowens opened things up with an RBI single in the first inning and the flood gates opened from there.

The Blue Devils would go on to score six more runs before Mount scored their first run of the game. Bowens finished the game with three hits in five at bats, with three RBIs. He was the major catalyst in the Blue Devils series opener, which they finished with a 7-2 victory.

The second game of the series had a completely reverse script to it. Mount Saint Mary’s led the game 5-2 going into the latter stages of the game. Bowens, Kanios, and Mahers, all had huge plate appearances in the last three innings of the game, and all three of the batters knocked in huge runs to give Central the lead and eventually the win.

The Blue Devils rallied to score five more runs after trailing 5-2 and won the contest 7-5. Freshman Chris Kanios led the way with two hits in four at bats, along with an RBI and two runs scored. Dylan Maher finished the game with three RBI’s, including the two that gave Central the lead in the top of the 9th inning.

The final game of the series came on Saturday, and the Blue Devils brought their best, and in return got one of their best offensive outings of the season. Ryan Costello started the game off with a solo home run to right field, followed by an RBI double by Mitch Guillmette, scoring TT Bowens to give Central an early 2-0 lead.

Mount Saint Mary’s got two of their three total runs in fourth inning of the game to tie it up at two a piece. That was the last hope that Mount had at winning a game in this series. In the fifth inning CCSU took the lead back 3-2, but in the sixth inning the offense started to soar. An RBI single by Dean Lockery started what would become a seven run inning for the Blue Devils.

Each team added another run for their team’s in the final three innings of the game, and Central would win the game 11-3, and sweep the weekend series to give themselves three important NEC  wins.
The Blue Devil baseball team now holds a record of 19-13 during the 2017 season, giving them the best overall record in the conference. Although Bryant is in first place in the NEC with a 6-1 record, they are just 12-18 overall. Central is right behind the Bulldogs, in second place with a conference record of 9-3.

CCSU has a big four-game home series against the Bryant Bulldogs upcoming from April 21-23, as the Blue Devils look to take sole possession of the first place spot in the NEC  heading into the second half of the season.

Neil Gorsuch: America’s 113th Supreme Court Justice

by Sophia Contreras

Neil Gorsuch was successfully appointed as the new Supreme Court justice on April 11 by Republicans bypassing Democrat’s filibuster and voting on majority versus the required sixty votes, something they will regret according to Central Connecticut State University political science professor Paul Petterson.

“The Republicans will come to regret the nuclear option in the long term. If the Democrats come into control, they will be more likely to use the same tactics and force someone down the Republicans’ throat, just as they did,” said Petterson.

Gorsuch was sworn in on Monday by Chief Justice Anthony Kennedy in the White House Rose Garden. Gorsuch is taking recently deceased Justice Antonin Scalia’s place in the Supreme Court.

“No two justices are the same, as a number of presidents have learned; sometimes, when an individual gets on the Supreme Court, they behave differently than people expected. Being on the court can change people, and once a person is there, the person can’t do anything about it,” said Petterson.

Gorsuch is expected to sit on various controversial cases, including cases concerning federal funding and the church, immigration status and criminal cases concerning minors.

“Gorsuch definitely opens the door for conservative majority,” said Petterson.

On the morning of Gorscuh’s appointment ceremony, President Donald Trump expressed his pride in having Gorsuch join the Supreme Court.

“I’ve always heard that the most important thing that a president of the United States does is appoint people, hopefully great people like this appointment, to the United States Supreme Court, and I can say this is a great honor.” said Trump. “The American people have gotten to know, respect and truly admire our newest member of the United States Supreme Court.”

Blue Devil Softball Stomp All Over Mount St. Mary’s University

by Kimberly Pena

Led by Karleigh Edward’s three RBI and Sarah Ogilvie’s two RBI afternoon, the Blue Devils stomped over Mount St. Mary’s University with an 11-1 victory. On a partly sunny Friday afternoon, Central Connecticut State University took advantage of Marian Ruf’s poor outing to improve their record to 9-19 for the season.

The damage began in the first inning when Alexis Debrosse led off the inning with a walk, after a pass ball and a strikeout to Brittany Camara, Britanny McNulla followed up with an RBI single. One batter later, Edward hit an RBI double to make the score 2-0. Ogilvie then hit an RBI single to make it 3-0.

Pitcher Alexandra Casañas continued her streak of good pitching, only allowing one run over five-innings, three hits, two walks and a strikeout. Casañas has now won three straight starts, permitting four earned runs over a span of 20 innings, dropping her ERA to 3.59.

“Alex does a great job of hitting her spots and keeping hitters off balance with her off speed pitches, said Edwards. “She is an important part of our pitching staff along with our two other pitchers.”

In the second inning, the Blue Devils increased their lead with Debrosse doing some of the damage with a two-run home, scoring Alicia Bertolino to make the score 5-0. It is Debrosse’s fourth homerun of the year.

But the big blow came in the fourth-inning, when CCSU sent 10 batters to the plate, scoring six runs on an already shaky Ruf. Tori Constantin led off the inning with a double, while Bertolino reached on a defensive misplay by second baseman Morgan Alisauckas. Two outs later, Camra walked to load the bases and McNulla walked to bring in a run.

With the bases still loaded, Kerri Dadalski singled in two more runs and advanced to second on the throw, extending the lead 8-0. The power duo of Edwards and Ogilvie came to bat back-to-back, with Edwards bringing in two more runs and Ogilvie scoring Edwards to end the afternoon for Ruf.

“I think in those situations I am just looking for a good pitch to drive in runners with,” said Edwards.

“Our offense can be extremely powerful and dangerous when everyone works together to string along some hits and puts pressure on the defense,” said Ogilvie.

Ruf’s final line was three and two-third innings, 11 runs, five earned, four walks and three strikeouts, giving her five losses in the season versus two wins.

Casañas kept the Mountaineers hitless in the last two innings, ending the game after five innings.

Moving forward, the team knows there are still changes to be made to continue on the success like Friday afternoon’s victory.

” I think that our team needs to continue to stay focused on both offense and defense and take it one game at a time, not thinking too far in advance,” said Edwards.

But the team knows if they can stick together, they can do just that.

“Our team chemistry is great both on and off the field,” said Ogilvie.  “We all have so much fun during practices and games; we all get along really well and all want to play and win for one another.”

The Blue Devils go on to face Saint Francis University on Sunday, April, 23, in a double-header. First pitch for game one is set for 12 p.m.

UMass Win Big Against Blue Devils 15-0

by Dillon Meehan

In a rare showing of poor form, Central Connecticut State University fell to University of Massachusetts 15-0 this past Tuesday.

After winning seven of their nine previous games before Tuesday’s outing, the Blue Devils (19-13. 10-3 NEC) suffered their biggest loss of the season.

“There was nothing we did well. I’m definitely trying to get this out of my memory,” said Blue Devils head coach Charlie Hickey after the game.

UMass jumped out to an early lead in the first inning, when Ryan Lever hit a two run homerun to left field. 

In the following inning, Dylan Robinson singled home a run to make it 3-0, before Lever followed up with his second homerun of the game, doubling UMass’s lead by making it 6-0. Following Lever’s second homerun, freshman pitcher Arik Sypher, who earned the loss, was pulled after throwing 1.2 innings.

“We didn’t do anything well. We didn’t hit, we didn’t pitch, we didn’t field, we didn’t do anything,” said a frustrated Hickey after the game.

UMass added another run in the third inning to make it 7-0, before recording six straights in the fourth and exploding for six runs to extend their lead to 13-0.

“We were displaying some ugly baseball which is pretty uncharacteristic for us, especially as of late,” said Hickey.

The Minutemen added two more runs in the sixth inning to make it 15-0, and cap off their impressive scoring output for the day.

“Obviously you never want to suffer a loss like this, but luckily enough it was out of conference play so it won’t impact us too much.”

Despite being shutout for only the third time this season, the Blue Devils faired well offensively, garnering nine hits. But they weren’t able to bring home any runs.

Senior Franklin Jennings and junior Dean Lockery played well, each grabbing a pair of singles. While junior Mitch Guilmette had both a single and a double.

“Luckily we have some veteran leadership, so this shouldn’t carry over to the weekend series,” Hickey said of his team’s chances this weekend.

Hickey was right, despite the rough outing against UMass, the Blue Devils were able to sweep the weekend series against Mount St. Mary’s, winning Thursday’s game 7-2, Friday’s 7-5 and Saturday’s game 11-3.

Following the weekend series, the Blue Devils continue to be in their grove, winning eight out of their last ten games. The Blue Devils face against Siena, then have a four game weekend series against Bryant, the NEC’s top-seeded team. If the Blue Devils win the majority of the games this weekend, they will steal the top spot in the conference.